Litchfield History Museum

7 South Street, Litchfield, CT 06759

About the Museum

The Litchfield History Museum exhibits the evolution of the town of Litchfield, CT from its settlement in 1719 to today. Through changing exhibits, artifacts and archives, as well as hands-on areas, visitors can explore the diverse history of the town. Litchfield was a bustling commercial,political, and educational center and is a case study for the evolution of New England towns following the Revolutionary War. The town’s history includes that of the center village, Bantam, East Litchfield, Milton, Northfield, and pre-1850s Morris. The Historical Society’s artifacts and archives document all areas. The exhibits are on the first floor of the Noyes Memorial Building.

The lower level is home to the Helga J. Ingraham Memorial Library.

Hours

April 27 – December 1, 2024

Wednesday through Sunday – 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Exhibit Supported by

Imagine taking Connecticut’s northern and southern borders and extending them west to the Pacific Ocean. Under the terms of a royal charter given to the colony in1662, Connecticut was to stretch from the “Narraganset-Bay on the East, to the South Sea on the West Part.” Following the model of other states, Connecticut gave most of its claimed land over to the federal government in 1786, but it “reserved” a territory in the northeast of present-day Ohio for its continued use and settlement. This became the Connecticut Western Reserve.

To Come to a Land of Milk and Honey: Litchfield and the Connecticut Western Reserve tells the story of the Reserve’s lasting legacy and the experiences of the men, women, and children affected by westward migration.

Click here to take a virtual tour of this exhibit!

Exhibit Sponsored by

Samplers are more than thread stitched through cloth. As objects of art, samplers tell stories of creativity, instruction, and skilled work. As historical records, they document the lives and experiences of thousands of young women, histories that might otherwise remain unknown.

With Their Busy Needles: Samplers and the Girls Who Made Them showcases works from the sampler collection of Alexandra Peters, displayed alongside Litchfield examples from the Historical Society’s textile collection. Peters, a sampler historian and collector, serves as guest curator of the exhibit.

On display April 27 through December 1, 2024.


Interested in a Private Tour?

Walking Tour Map
We have a walking tour map available for $2 that provides a self-guided tour of the historic district’s homes and businesses. Stop in and purchase one today! Or, download the free, digital version of the Walking Tour Brochure. (PDF, 3MB)

MUSEUMS FREE TO ALL!

In our continuing efforts to better serve the Litchfield community we are pleased to once again offer free admission, generously sponsored by Gallagher.