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Deming, Perkins, and Quincy families papers, 1762-1950

By Linda Hocking, Leith Johnson, and Nathan Koldys

Collection Overview

Title: Deming, Perkins, and Quincy families papers, 1762-1950

Creator: Quincy, Mary Perkins (1866-1921)

Extent: 30.0 Linear Feet

Arrangement:

The papers are arranged in four series:

Series 1: Deming family

Series 2: Perkins family

Series 3: Quincy family

Series 4: Other papers

Date Acquired: 01/01/1921

Languages: English [eng], French [fre]

Scope and Contents of the Materials

The Deming, Perkins, and Quincy Families Papers document members of several prominent families who lived in the town of Litchfield, Conn. In the late eighteenth century, the patriarchs of each family earned wealth through their activities as merchants, traders, and investors, enabling them and many of the members of the next generations to live lives free from financial concern, if not outright luxury. The papers consist largely of correspondence, and also include collections of financial and legal papers, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, photograph albums, diaries, and calling cards and other printed materials. The papers of Mary Perkins Quincy (1866-1921) comprise most of the collection.

At this time, generally only papers created prior to 1840 have been processed, although all of papers in the collection have been listed in this finding aid. Mary Perkins Quincy's papers have been partially processed and a finding aid is available by accessing the digital content link.

The papers are arranged in four series:

Series 1. Deming family

Series 2: Perkins family

Series 3: Quincy family

Series 4: Other papers

The series related to the three families also include papers of other families associated by marriage.

Series 1. Deming family (2.71 lin. ft.)

Julius Deming (1755-1838) was a leading merchant of Litchfield's most prosperous period. In addition to his various business ventures, Deming was politically active in his town and in the new nation. Born in North Lyme, he moved to Litchfield after his 1781 marriage to his first cousin, Dorothy Champion (1759-1830) of Colchester, Conn. The papers in this series relate to members of both the Deming family and the Champion family.

During the American Revolutionary War, Deming served under Dorothy's father, Col. Henry Champion, the principal assistant commissary general for the Eastern Division of the Continental Army. Deming, who attained the rank of captain of cavalry, was with the convoy that crossed the Hudson River to deliver supplies to Washington's army at Valley Forge. A collection of papers, including account books, daybooks, ledgers, and correspondence document Deming's Revolutionary War activities. After the war, he established himself in trade by obtaining goods directly from England—an unusual practice at a time when most Connecticut merchants got their wares from New York and Boston, and there is extensive documentation relating to a trip he took to London during which he selected goods for importation to America. Deming's merchandise arrived in New Haven Harbor and was brought by wagon to Litchfield. From there, it was sold in shops owned by Deming and his partner, Col. Benjamin Tallmadge. The two had shops in Litchfield and other towns. In addition to their other goods from Europe and the West Indies, they once imported a cargo of horses from England. All of these business activities are documented in the collection. In the early 1800s, Deming bought shares in the Litchfield China Trading Company. The articles of agreement list Tallmadge, Oliver Wolcott Jr., the future secretary of the treasury, and Frederick Wolcott as the original partners. Oliver Wolcott, Jr. maintained an office in New York City, the location of the port from which their ship—the Trident—set sail. The company lasted until 1814, and the venture is represented in the collection. Deming's other business ventures included the manufacture of iron and a paper mill in Bantam. Little is known about the mill, but there is an agreement concerning the venture in his papers and a sample of its paper is in the Historical Society's collections. Deming's land investments in Champion, N.Y. are also documented in the papers.

Though a family genealogy described him as disliking public life, Deming held several elected and appointed offices. He served three terms in the House of Representatives, along with stints as a magistrate and the county treasurer. In addition, he was a member of the First School Society, a body in charge of both the town's schools and the burying ground. Deming was also instrumental in getting a courthouse built in Litchfield, and the papers contain documents detailing construction specifications and two documents related to architect William Spratts, who had a hand in its design and construction. In 1798, President John Adams appointed Deming, Epaphroditus Champion (see below), and three others commissioners "to provide for the valuation of lands and houses, and for the enumeration of slaves." The appointment certificate, signed by Adams, is one of the highlights of the collection.

Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming had eight children and all are represented in the papers. Julius Deming Jr. (1782-1799) died of disease while attending Yale College. Frederick Deming (1787-1860), Charles Deming (1789-1852), and William Deming (1792-1865) moved to New York City and formed a business partnership that lasted until the mid-1810s. The collection contains limited documentation of their enterprise. Frederick remained in New York and became president of the Union Bank, while Charles and William returned to Litchfield. Charles was plagued by bad health, and correspondence in the collection details his efforts to stay well through many doctors’ visits, treatments, and even a respite in the West Indies in the 1830s culminating with a harrowing trip back to the United States. Unfortunately, nothing proved particularly helpful. Three of the Demings’ four daughters remained unmarried. Dorothy Deming (1784-1835), Mary Deming (1798-1847) and Lucretia Deming resided in Litchfield. Lucretia would end up owning the family homestead as the last survivor of her generally unwell siblings. Clarissa Deming (1795-1837) married Charles Perkins (1792-1856) of Norwich, Conn., a Litchfield Law School student about whom more will be found in the discussion of the Perkins family below. In 1830, Perkins underwent a religious conversion, and Clarissa’s letters express her profound joy regarding the event. The siblings wrote many letters among themselves and their parents and chronicle their business activities, rising and falling health, travels in the United States and Caribbean, and news of their extended family and friends.

The wealth of the Deming family is revealed in family members’ journals and account books listing investments, income, and expenses, and for most members, there are estate papers that contain detailed inventories.

The Deming family series also contains a substantial collection of papers relating to the Champion family of Colchester. Henry Champion (1723-1797) began his military career at the age of 18 when he was appointed ensign of an Army company in 1741. He was a captain during the French and Indian War and in 1772 he was appointed a major in the colonial militia. In April, 1775, he was appointed a commissioner to supply all necessary stores and provisions for the American troops. Champion was appointed in 1778 as sole Commissary General of the Eastern Dept. of the Continental Army by Col. Peter Colt. In May, 1780, Col. Champion resigned his army commission the array and returned to his home in Westchester section of Colchester. He had been prominent in politics before he enlisted in the army, and continued to regularly elected in the 1780s and 1790s. Champion was married to Deborah Brainard Champion (1724-1789). They had nine children, including Henry Champion (1751-1836); Epaphroditus Champion (1756-1834); Dorothy Champion Deming (1756-1834), wife of Julius Deming; Mary Champion Bulkley (1762-1843); and Esther Champion Cleaveland (1766-1840). Champion married Sarah Brainard Lewis following the death of his first wife.

Henry Champion (1751-1836) enlisted in the Continental Army in 1775. He was an officer in battle of Bunker Hill, participated in the retreat of the American troops from Long Island, rendered services under Tadeusz Kosciusko in constructing the defenses at West Point, and led the first battalion of Connecticut Light Infantry at the capture of Stony Point, N.Y. Following the war, he returned to Westchester and entered politics and was active in obtaining a charter for the Phoenix Bank. He also had interests in the Connecticut Land Co. and was instrumental in the formation of the School Fund in Connecticut. Champion, Ohio, was named in his honor. Champion married Abigail Tinker Champion (1758-1818) and they had ten children, including Aristarchus Champion (1784-1871) and Abigail Champion Deming (1787-1835).

Epaphroditus Champion (1756-1834) also served in the Continental Army, serving under the direction of the commissary general in New York. In 1777, he returned to Colchester where he remained involved with providing provisions for the army until leaving the service in 1780. He was active in politics and the militia and successfully conducted trade in the West Indies. He married Lucretia Hubbard Champion (1760-1836) and they had three children, including Clarissa Champion (1785-1801).

Of particular note are the letters Epaphroditus Champion (1756-1834), Henry Champion (1723-1797), and his son Henry Champion (1751-1836) wrote during the American Revolutionary War. All three men, along with Julius Deming, were involved in supplying the American army with cattle, pigs, and other provisions. In addition to discussing commissary matters and his desire to leave service, the younger Champion wrote a letter in which he provided a detailed account of the Americans’ attack on Stony Point in 1777. A subsequent letter accuses the official account provided by commanding officer Maj. Anthony Wayne as having been willfully manipulated and flawed and suggests that Gen. George Washington himself had inadvertently perpetuated inaccurate information. Additional documentation related to the Revolutionary War is found in correspondence among family members and Julius Deming as they sought to obtain war pensions in 1834. In 1798, President John Adams appointed Julius Deming (see above), Epaphroditus Champion, and three others commissioners "to provide for the valuation of lands and houses, and for the enumeration of slaves." The appointment certificate, signed by Adams, is one of the highlights of the collection.

The Champions and Demings remained closely connected. They were involved in several business ventures together, including the importation of horses from England, and they are documented in the papers. Epaphroditus Champion wrote to Julius seeking advice. Dorothy Champion Deming, her brothers and sisters, various in-laws, and their children shared a long correspondence. Several of the cousins attended the Litchfield Female Academy together. One letter, from then-15-year-old Clarissa Champion to her cousin Dorothy Deming, is playful and gossipy, and comments in part on Napoleon Bonaparte and an acquaintance’s weight gain and frizzy hairstyle. Clarissa suddenly died one year later, and the families’ grief is expressed in their correspondence.

Letters written by members of Deming and Champion families occasionally mention slaves or servants. There are a number of references to a servant named Vira. Julius Deming’s papers include her emancipation document. The collection contains one letter written by Vira to Dorothy Deming in June, 1802. (Search on “Vira” to find the relevant documents.) Two 1812 letters from Henry Champion (1751-1836) to Julius Deming discuss Kate, a former slave of Champion’s father.

Series 2. Perkins family (1.25 lin. ft.)

Papers in Series 2, Perkins family, relate to the family of Andrew Perkins (1743-1822), a Norwich, Conn., sea captain and merchant. In the 1760s and early 1770s, he made several voyages to the West Indies, England, and possibly elsewhere, and these are documented in Perkins’1763-1769 account book and customs papers. The 1763-1769 account book also contains an accounting entry and a separate statement that include references to “2 Negroes.” During the American Revolutionary War, Perkins and various business associates funded privateers. At this same time, they also organized at least two non-privateering ventures that involved the brigantine Marquis de Lafayette, Elisha Hinman, Commander. The papers contain the ship’s log book documenting two voyages, one in 1782 to the West Indies and one in 1783 to Virginia and The Netherlands.

Perkins was married three times, the first to Anne Turner Perkins (1747-1785); second, Mary Niles (1764-17867); and third, Elizabeth Taylor Perkins (1761-1830). The collection contains several letters from Elizabeth’s father Eldad Taylor (1707-1777) and her brother Rev. John Taylor (1762-1843).

Andrew Perkins had a total of 13 children with his first and third wives. Only five lived into adulthood: Andrew Perkins (1774-1796), Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham Boswell (1776-1835), Charles Perkins (1792-1856), Harriet Perkins (1793-1821), and Abigail Perkins (1795-1875).

Charles Perkins got a taste of the sea when he was 15. A journal found in the papers chronicles a voyage he took to Sandwich Bay in Canada. In 1813, he attended the Litchfield Law School, where he met Clarissa Deming, a daughter of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming, who would become his wife. After he completed his studies, he returned to Norwich to set up his practice. The papers contain his notebooks and docket books. Although he seems to have enjoyed some success, letters among him, Clarissa, and Julius Deming indicate the young couple needed to borrow $1,800 from Deming to purchase a residence. In 1826, Perkins decided to seek his fortune in Rochester, N.Y. He encountered success there, acquiring properties, collecting rents, and establishing a busy practice, eventually being admitted to the State Supreme Court of New York. A letterbook, daybook, and ledger provide details on his Rochester business dealings. He wrote letters in which he outlined his ambitious plans to relocate in New York City. Clarissa had frequent bouts of bad health leaving her in fragile condition, and she often remained in Litchfield with their children. During the time he was in Rochester, there was an active religious revival, and it had a great impact on Charles; in October, 1830, he wrote a seven-page letter expressing his new-found devotion. Although the letter itself is not in the papers, letters among Charles, Clarissa, and his sister Abigail document its content. The women were overjoyed with his conversion. In the 1830s, Perkins resettled in Litchfield, while still conducting business ventures in New York state. He and Clarissa Deming Perkins had eight children, three of whom lived to adulthood and are discussed below.

The papers contain a large number of letters to and from Abigail Perkins (1795-1875), who never married. She lived in Norwich through the 1820s, but frequently stayed in Rochester and Litchfield. After Charles returned to Litchfield in the 1830s, she settled there, too. The numerous letters between Abigail and her sister-in-law suggest they had a close relationship. Also of interest are the several diaries Abigail kept in the 1820s and 1830s.

Charles’ sister Harriet also took a sea voyage as a child; an 1807 diary describes a journey to Antigua. Also like Charles, Harriet underwent a religious conversion. Her papers illustrate her serious commitment to her faith. By her late teens, she was filling notebooks with passages of spiritual significance to her, and her diaries, which appear to be written almost compulsively, demonstrate her religious struggles. In her papers is the 1818 statement she prepared on the occasion of her conversion. She attended religious meetings and at least one revival, in Providence in 1820, but did not provide any details about them in her writings. Ironically, the Providence revival may have hastened her death; after she returned to Norwich, she complained of a persistent “cold” that worsened. She continued writing in her diary until just weeks before her death in 1821. Harriet’s last hours are chronicled in a lengthy account found in the papers of her sister Abigail.

The collection also contains the papers of Charles and Harriet’s sister Elizabeth Perkins (1776-1835), who married Capt. Solomon Ingraham and after his death, Capt. John Boswell (sometimes Buswell). The three siblings corresponded often, providing documentation of the family’s activities.

Charles Perkins and Clarissa Deming Perkins had three children who survived to adulthood: Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin (1824-1905), Julius Deming Perkins (1830-1911), and Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy (1832-1883). Their papers are an important part of the collection, but have not yet been processed.

Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin was married to James Mason Hoppin (1820-1906). He graduated from Yale in 1840 and Harvard Law School in 1842. After studying theology, he served as pastor of the Congregational church in Salem, Mass., from 1850 to 1859. He was later professor of art history at Yale and taught homiletics at Union Theological Seminary. He and Mary Deming Perkins had two children. After the deaths of Mary’s sister Lucretia and her husband in 1883, their children Mary Perkins Quincy and John W. Quincy Jr. resided with the Hoppins.

Julius Deming Perkins spent his early life in Litchfield. His career as an importer took him to New York City. He married Margaretta Dotterer and they returned to Litchfield. He was one of the incorporators and the first president of the Shepaug Valley Railroad. After fires in 1886 and 1888 destroyed many of Litchfield’s structures, Perkins funded the construction of a fire department. Perkins was active in politics and served on state boards. His wife and he had two children, Julius Deming Perkins Jr. and Edith Perkins. She married William Woodville Rockville.

Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy was married to John Williams Quincy (1813-1883), a descendant of the prominent Quincy family of Boston. For more about John William Quincy, see the description of Series 3, Quincy family, below. They had two children, Mary Perkins Quincy (1866-1921) and John W. Quincy Jr. (1868-1950).

Series 3. Quincy family (25.83 lin. ft.)

Almost all of the papers in this series consist of the papers of Mary Perkins Quincy (1866-1921), and includes her correspondence, materials regarding her domestic and international travels, genealogical records, and various items relating to her affiliations with the Daughters of the American Revolution, The Colonial Dames, and other memorial institutions. Her correspondences include letters from all corners of the globe, namely Prussia, Canada, Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Great Britain, Russia, France, Italy, Morocco, Greece and Egypt. Her correspondents included family, diplomats, and members of the royal families of several nations. Quincy had an especially active correspondence with her aunt, Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin. There is no correspondence to or from Quincy after 1913 although she did not die until 1921. A partial finding aid for her papers is available by clicking on the digital content link.

Mary Perkins Quincy was born in New York City to John Williams Quincy and Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy. Her father was a descendent of the prominent Quincy family of Boston, Mass. He entered business life as an iron merchant in New York, eventually becoming partner in the firm of Davenport and Quincy. He was married first to Katherine Feeks Allen with whom he had one child, Katherine Allen Quincy Trowbridge. After the death of his first wife, Quincy married Lucretia Perkins Deming in 1864. They had two children, Mary and John W. Quincy Jr. (1866-1950). In the late 1800s, an as-yet-to-determined condition required John Williams Jr. to spend the rest of his life under private institutional care.

After the death of their parents in 1883, Mary and John relocated from New York to New Haven to live with her mother’s sister Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin and her husband James Mason Hoppin. Mary Perkins Quincy also spent a large portion of her life in Litchfield with her uncle Julius Deming Perkins and his wife. In 1904, she had a home built in Litchfield called Ardley where she resided until her death in 1921.

Quincy spent the vast majority of her life pursuing her many passions, which included membership to memorial societies, genealogy, historic preservation, writing and travel. She was an active member of several historical societies, including the Litchfield Historical Society; ancestral groups such as the Colonial Dames of America, and the Daughters of the American Revolution; and art clubs like the Needle and Bobbin Club in Litchfield. She coauthored a privately published book entitled Pages of Azure and Gold with Sarah Gardiner.

The remainder of the series consists of several small collections of correspondence. Of interest are two Revolutionary War-era letters written by Qunicy’s great-great-grandfather Edmund Quincy to his daughters Katherine Quincy and Dorothy Quincy Hancock Scott.

Series 4. Other papers (0.21 lin. ft.)

All papers that cannot be specifically associated with either the Deming, Perkins, or Quincy family have been placed in Series 4, Other papers. Included are such items as third party correspondence, bills and receipts, land records, and publications. Of particular interest are 1801 emancipation documents for Candace, “a Negro servant girl,” and a printed broadside, presumably from 1775, of the petition of Continental Congress of October, 1774.

Biographical Note

Mary Perkins Quincy was born on January 13, 1866 in New York, New York to John Williams Quincy and Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy.  She lived in New York until the death of her parents in 1883, at which time she and her brother relocated to New Haven, Connecticut where they became the wards of their maternal aunt, Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin, and her husband James Mason Hoppin.  According to an obituary published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Quincy attended Miss Leverett’s School in New York and another school in New York kept by Mesdemoiselle Charbonnier of Paris, in addition to various tutors at home and abroad. 

Quincy spent a large portion of her life in Litchfield, Connecticut, where she had a home built in 1904 called Ardley.  She resided there until her death in 1921.  Litchfield was the seat of her maternal uncle Julius Deming Perkins and his wife, Margaretta Dotterer Perkins.  Litchfield was home to several generations of Quincy’s ancestors, including members of the Deming and Champion families. 

Quincy spent the vast majority of her life pursuing her many passions, which included membership to memorial societies, genealogy, historic preservation, writing and domestic and foreign travel.  She was an active member of several historical societies, including the Litchfield Historical Society; ancestral groups such as the Colonial Dames of America, and the Daughters of the American Revolution; and art clubs like the Needle and Bobbin Club in Litchfield.  She coauthored a privately published book entitled Pages of Azure and Gold with Sarah Gardiner.

Her correspondences include letters from all corners of the globe, namely Prussia, Canada, Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Great Britain, Russia, France, Italy, Morocco, Greece and Egypt.  Her correspondents included family, diplomats, and members of the royal families of several nations.  Quincy had an especially active correspondence with her aunt, Mary Hoppin.

Administrative Information

Accruals:

The first addition came in 1951 when Ardley, Quincy’s Litchfield home, was sold by the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England).  After the heirs to the Quincy estate removed the items they wished to have, and an antique dealer removed items for sale, Charlotte Wiggin, then Curator for the Litchfield Historical Society, removed from the attic papers and objects not desired by the other parties.  The majority of these papers was, at some point, put in archival folders and boxes and labeled “Mary Perkins Quincy Collection.”  Most of the folders were simply labeled “correspondence” while others appear to probably reflect the organization of Quincy herself, saying things such as “charming curiosities of Professor and Mrs. Hoppin.” 

The second addition came from Edith Howell Perkins Rockhill, a cousin of Mary Perkins Quincy and heir and executors to her estate.  In 1923, she donated an iron strong box said to have been owned by the Deming family.  In addition to portrait miniatures, currency, and jewelry, the strong box contained papers pertaining to the Champion and Deming families during the Revolution.  These papers are also among the portion of the collection previously cataloged as “Quincy Collection.”  They were added to the accession book in the 1950s, but the numbers were not written on the documents.

Finally, a former director of the Historical Society, William Warren, purchased a number of Deming-Perkins family papers from an antiques dealer.  He did this shortly after Ardley was sold.  Warren was an avid collector who sought items with specific Litchfield provenance.  There is no evidence that he sought out the materials that were sold from Ardley by the antique dealer, but it is entirely possible that these papers also came from the Quincy home.  The description of this portion of the collection is vague, but it does include records of people who were heavily represented in other parts of the collection.

Access Restrictions: The collection is open for research.

Acquisition Source: Mary Perkins Quincy

Acquisition Method: This collection was received in four major accessions, with several smaller additions.  The first came in 1921, with the death of Mary Perkins Quincy.  The materials which had been arranged by Quincy were accessioned as 1921-2-1 through 1921-02-15.  Included in this accession file is a document created by Quincy titled “Index to the Deming-Perkins Family Memorials, Quincy Collection.”  These documents were presumably kept at the Historical Society and thought to be part of this accession, though the actual items were not numbered.  These papers do not appear to have been kept together, as some of them were housed in uncataloged boxes labeled “Deming-Perkins Papers” while others appeared in the card catalog and were filed within four cataloged boxes labeled “Quincy Collection.”

Related Materials:

Architectural survey of the borough of Litchfield

Records of the Litchfield Needle and Bobbin Club

See also museum collections for objects of material culture

The Quincy Family Papers, of which Mary Perkins Quincy was a donor, are at the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Preferred Citation: Demings, Perkins, and Quincy families papers (1950-01-0), Litchfield Historical Society, Helga J. Ingraham Memorial Library, P.O. Box 385, 7 South Street, Litchfield, Connecticut, 06759

Other Note: This collection was processed with support from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), the Connecticut Humanities Council (CHC), and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.


Box and Folder Listing

Series 1: Deming familyAdd to your cart.

Arranged alphabetically by family member. Unless otherwise noted, correspondence is placed first, followed by type of document listed alphabetically. Within each type, the papers are arranged chronologically.

Sub-series 30, Other family papers, contains papers that relate to more than one family member (other than correspondence), such as business agreements among members of the Deming and Champion families; papers that cannot be attributed to a specific person, such as a receipt given to "Miss Deming"; and various third-party items that relate to the Deming or Champion families.

Sub-Series 1: Bulkley, Mary ChampionAdd to your cart.
Mary Champion Bulkley (1762-1843) was a sister-in-law of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Bulkley, Mary Champion to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1783 Oct 19Add to your cart.
News of family.
Sub-Series 2: Champion, Aristarchus, 1852Add to your cart.
Aristarchus Champion (1784-1871) was a son of Henry Champion (1751-1836) and a nephew of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Champion, Aristarchus to Deming, Miss, undatedAdd to your cart.
Short note regarding a visit.
Folder 2: Legal papers, 1852Add to your cart.
Papers regarding a suit brought in Monroe County New York by Aristarchus Champion against Charles Perkins, Abby Perkins, William Hungerford, William R. Cone and the Bank of the State of New York.
Sub-Series 3: Champion, ClarissaAdd to your cart.
Clarissa Champion (1785-1801) was a daughter of Epaphroditus Champion and a niece of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1800, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Clarissa to Deming, Dorothy, 1800 Feb 1Add to your cart.
Writes with news of friends and family; sleighing; Lucretia's pianoforte; has written a eulogy; an account of Bonaparte; books she has read; Phebe Moseley's weight gain; a poem she wrote about Bonaparte; a superb ball; Miss Phebe's hairstyle; mourning on Feb. 22; would send Vira a painting is she had any brushes. A small painting of flowers is attached to the first page.
Item 2: Champion, Clarissa to Deming, Dorothy Champion, [?] Jul 31Add to your cart.
Writes about visiting Litchfield and her cousins visiting there.
Sub-Series 4: Champion, Epaphroditus (1756-1834)Add to your cart.
Epaphroditus Champion (1756-1834) was a brother-in-law of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1776-1781Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1776 Oct 9Add to your cart.
Writes from Manor of Pelham regarding clothes she has sent him including his regimental coat; he left a Spanish milled dollar in his corduroy breeches pocket and hope she has taken it out and kept it safe; hopes to be at Colchester within a month.
Item 2: Gray, [S.?] to Champion, Epaphroditus, 1777 Jan 20Add to your cart.
Writes that the bearer of this has brought 5 cattle; he depends on Champion sending a number more or the army there must suffer for want of provision; he must not fail.
Item 3: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Julius, 1777 Mar 24Add to your cart.
Writes that their people are likely to get well through inoculation; discusses cattle and settling the due; wants Deming to find out what Capt. Phelps has done as it is time to do something about it; if Deming can light of a Mugford fuzee or rather a carbine he wishes Deming buy one for him; order from Gov. Trumbull regarding a new quota of men; inoculation.
Item 4: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Julius, 1781 Apr 9Add to your cart.
Cone and Emmons have not left money due on note; Capt. Deming sets out from Boston next Monday; discusses French Army contracting for supplies; bills of [exchange?] and hard money; army has 300 cattle on hand; just returned from Freemasons meeting; his representatives.
Item 5: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Julius, 1781 Sep 14Add to your cart.
Writes from Baltimore that the French and American troops that did not take shipping at Head of Elk are now there; discusses Cornwallis and Washington and troop movements.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1799-1808Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Julius, 1799 May 21Add to your cart.
Writes regarding Clarissa boarding with Deming as he has several of the nieces who will attend the school at Litchfield; wishes she be provided with necessary supplies and clothes; would Deming advise her in her course of study; encloses a bill to count against a bill Deming will soon have against him.
Item 2: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Julius, 1800 Jun 12Add to your cart.
He has received a pianoforte for Deming; will write to Birkenhead to come; reports on who will and will not attend; orders some broadcloth to be sent to a wing chair maker.
Item 3: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1802 Nov 3Add to your cart.
Did not go to New York as soon as he expected; ordered tea sets; instructions about payment.
Item 4: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Julius, 1804 Mar 24Add to your cart.
Discusses construction of the Middlesex turnpike road contracted by Col. John Wadsworth and him; wishes a line from Deming on the subject.
Item 5: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Julius, 1808 Apr 25Add to your cart.
Discusses recent elections; embargo; Congress and the President; relations with England and France.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1833-1834Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Lucretia, 1833 Jan 13Add to your cart.
He felt comfort to know that Lucretia's health had improved and she was comfortably situated in New York; advises about returning to Litchfield.
Item 2: Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Julius, 1834 Feb 28Add to your cart.
Writes regarding their American Revolutionary War pension applications; account of service of Reuben Champion.
Folder 4: American Revolutionary War pension application papersAdd to your cart.
Folder 5: Deed, Champion, Epaphroditus to Deming, Julius for land in Litchfield, Conn., 1783 Jul 19Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 5: Champion, Epaphroditus, Jr. (1786-1841)Add to your cart.
Epaphroditus Champion Jr. (1786-1841) was a son of Ephaphroditus Champion (1756-1834) and a nephew of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1835-1836Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Epaphroditus, Jr. to Bacon, Lucretia Champion and Deming, Dorothy, 1835 Mar 26Add to your cart.
Writes regarding his mother's health; asks Dorothy in a note that if Mrs. B. is sick to use her discretion in handing her this letter.
Item 2: Champion, Epaphroditus, Jr. to Deming, Julius, 1836 Jun 20Add to your cart.
Reports the sudden death of his mother.
Sub-Series 6: Champion, Henry (1723-1797)Add to your cart.
Henry Champion (1723-1797) was the father-in-law of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1775-1783Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1775 Dec 20Add to your cart.
Gives instructions regarding the purchase of pigs.
Item 2: Champion, Henry to Root, Benjamin, 1777 Feb 25Add to your cart.
Gives instructions to have 50 head of cattle at Peek Kill for Julius Deming on the 3rd day of March at farthest; from whom to acquire them; Deming must write him on all of Deming's and his affairs.
Item 3: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1777 Apr 12Add to your cart.
Writes regarding sending 60 cattle to Peeks Kill; Deming must order the drover to send them to Jersey to the Army and Col. Trumbull; he will send 40 or 50 more next Tuesday; he has devised that Deming will be notified from the Jerseys etc. of the numbers wanted; Deming must notify him; instructions.
Item 4: Mills, Elisha to Champion, Henry, 1779 Aug 16Add to your cart.
The money affair grows daily more alarming; the towns in that area had a convention and decided a committee should be formed to prevent any further depreciation; if Champion believes it is duty to prevent money running out, ask leave to use his influence; in his opinion, the sole power of appreciation of the currency is with the Confederated States.
Sub-Series 7: Champion, Henry (1751-1836)Add to your cart.
Henry Champion (1751-1836) was a brother-in-law of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1776-1777Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1776 Jul 1Add to your cart.
Writes from New York and discusses arrival of Gen. Howe at Sandy Hook; making preparations to receive Mr. Howe; fears the most pleasant part their campaign for that year is passed; they can't expect a season of uninterrupted pleasure in an army.
Item 2: Champion, Henry to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1777 Nov 8Add to your cart.
Writes from camp at Greenwich and reports the first of his wants will be shirts; wrote earlier for a pair of gloves or mittens; there is between one and two thousand men at Terry Town; has received but one letter from her.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1779 Feb-MarAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry (1751-1836) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 Feb 12Add to your cart.
Writes from camp that life is better than he expected; arrangements about his shoes and clothes; has settled his recruiting accounts with the public; sees no prospect that war will end soon; his design at present is to leave the service in April or May, though his intentions are not much suspected in camp.
Item 2: Champion, Henry (1751-1836) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 Feb 26Add to your cart.
Writes from Camp Reading to acknowledge receipt of parcels; at his father's request, he sends an account of the soldiers punished for desertion during his period of service in the light infantry.
Item 3: Champion, Henry (1751-1836) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 Mar 14Add to your cart.
Writes from camp that clothing and provisions for the troops have been received from the state store; Col. Hazen's regiment has been ordered to Springfield to guard stores; things go well for him in camp but he wishes to know what business would open to him if he quits service in May as soon as the Assembly rises; hope for a pair of shoes from home.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1779 Apr-MayAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry (1751-1835) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 Apr 2Add to your cart.
Writes from camp that he will heading for home on a furlough; discusses his public accounts.
Item 2: Champion, Henry (1751-1835) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 Apr 14Add to your cart.
Writes from camp that he dined with Gen. Parsons and discussed resigning; was offered a furlough but was forbidden to resign; Parsons mentioned nothing about his serving during the next campaign as brigade major; highly probable that he will insist on retiring from service next month; proposes to set out for Colchester next Monday if he can get somebody to serve as brigade major while he is absent.
Item 3: Champion, Henry (1751-1835) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 May 21Add to your cart.
Left half of letter is missing. Writes from camp about returning home; Gen. Lawson; desertions have multiplied.
Item 4: Champion, Henry (1751-1835) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 May 28Add to your cart.
Writes from Camp Reading that he expects Col. Grosvenor will procure for him a portmanteau; he went yesterday to Col. Wyllys' headquarters with the purpose to tell Wyllys his intention to leave the service, but did not mention it; he shall go again and if there is no objection he shall be home within a month; nothing new in camp; their destination in the ensuing campaign unknown.
Folder 4: Correspondence, 1779 Jul-OctAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry (1751-1835) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 Jul 1Add to your cart.
Writes from the camp at highlands of York that he obtained permission to resign and waited for money from the State of Connecticut to arrive so that he could collect his dues and pay his debts, but it is with the utmost trouble that a discharge can now be obtained without some disrepute, except in peculiar cases; he has concluded to stay in the army this campaign and at the close of it shall immediately leave it, which should not be more than 5 months; if his father thinks it advisable to leave the service his father should write him; situation of Ens. McDowell who has resigned; the enemy at Kings-Ferry; nothing new in camp but good news from the southward.
Item 2: Champion, Henry (1751-1835) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 Jul 24Add to your cart.
Writes from camp near the ruins of Fort Montgomery that since his last letter he has been engaged in one of the most serious and fortunate transactions of his life, the attacking of the enemy's works on Stony Point by storm; describes the attack in detail; has received the wares his father sent; sending back his horse and will draw one from public stores for use in the campaign, the close of which will close his service in the army, unless fate intevenes.
Item 3: Champion, Henry (1751-1835) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 Aug 15Add to your cart.
Has received the tea, sugar, and cheese and will write if wishes to have anything else sent from home, but at present is not in want; does not expect to be home before next December; the kettle is ready for his mother; discusses light infantry encampment and expectation of where they will move; Gen. Wayne's narrative of the capture of Stony Point has given uneasiness to the greatest part of troops under his command; Gen. Wayne has omitted every circumstance that reflects any particular credit to any troops but his own; discusses flaws in Gen. Wayne's narrative; even Gen. Washington has made some mistakes which he attributes to wrong information from Gen. Wayne or some of his aides; Champion describes how he wrote the account in his letter to make it as accurate as possible; describes his command and subordinates; enemy has taken and fortified Stony Point in such numbers that he thinks they will not again attack it; speculates on continuation of the war.
Item 4: Champion, Henry (1751-1835) to Champion, Henry (1723-1797), 1779 Oct 29Add to your cart.
Writes from camp at Paramus and describes their march there because of an incursion made by the enemy into the Jerseys; Stony Point was evacuated; expects they will stay in the Jerseys; shall be home as soon as the campaign closes, which will be some time next month.
Folder 5: Correspondence, 1781, 1783Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1781 MayAdd to your cart.
Writes regarding the purchase of 20 to 50 cattle; payment.
Item 2: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1781 May 15Add to your cart.
Writes regarding delivery of oxen and procurement of cattle; payment.
Item 3: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1783 Apr 26Add to your cart.
Writes from New York asking to give the enclosed to Mr. Seymour; finds things there in confusion and fears the British will not leave for 6 months; good are not very cheap.
Folder 6: Correspondence, 1795 May-NovAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1795 May 19Add to your cart.
Has spoken to Abraham Skinner about going to England to purchase horses and the idea pleases him; knows of no man who will answer their purpose so well; if they conclude to send him, best determine by July; thinks Skinner will be ready to go in September; Esther Cleaveland was laid aside with a daughter last Friday.
Item 2: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1795 Aug 20Add to your cart.
Discusses sending to Europe for horses.
Item 3: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1795 Oct 7Add to your cart.
Reports on his considerable inquiry into the business of importing horses from Europe; sickness in New York has prevented him from going there, but he has no doubt of obtaining adventurers enough for the voyage.
Item 4: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1795 Nov 24Add to your cart.
Has concluded with Epaphroditus Champion for the charter of his brig to Europe for horses and has completed the partnership agreement; discusses details of the venture.
Folder 7: Correspondence, Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1799 DecAdd to your cart.
Four letters regarding the importation of horses from Europe.
Folder 8: Correspondence, 1796-1801Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1796 Sep 8Add to your cart.
Writes regarding Skinner's trip to Europe to return with horses; selling a horse; will act on Deming's information respecting the notes; health of family.
Item 2: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1797 Jul 24Add to your cart.
Reports the death of his father; his father's estate; his mother's estate; his wife has given birth to a son and a daughter; present situation in Europe is such that he is not certain it is best for them to undertake an importation of horses at this time.
Item 3: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1797 Oct 24Add to your cart.
Discusses importation of horses; they sold their half of the King William; fears he will not be able to furnish his part of the money for the importation.
Item 4: Champion, Henry to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1801 May 18Add to your cart.
News of family; settlement of their sister's husband's estate to her benefit.
Folder 9: Correspondence, 1805, 1812Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1805 Aug 20Add to your cart.
Encloses Deming's deed from Abraham Skinner; Champion passed through the tract and from what he could see it was beautiful rolling land and very well watered; the whole of the west side lies on a good road leading directly to Cleveland and 5 miles from the Cuyahoga River; he is now returning from the treaty with the Indians having effected the purchase he went to make.
Item 2: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1805 Aug 30Add to your cart.
Writes regarding the health of his wife; he will be making a large purchase of $50,000 and wishes to consult Deming especially about the debts he owes him; their Connecticut Land company met in Hartford; wishes to meet with him.
Item 3: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1812 May 12Add to your cart.
Writes that Kate, a Negro woman who was a slave to his late father, requires financial support; would like Deming's advice.
Item 4: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1812 Jun 1Add to your cart.
Reports the death of Kate, the Negro woman about whom he had previously written.
Folder 10: Correspondence, 1821-1830Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1821 Jan 15Add to your cart.
Writes regarding his reflections on the condition of bank property in this state; encloses $11, the balance due Deming from him on his father's and mother's estates.
Item 2: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1822 Jan 23Add to your cart.
Asks that Deming return his late father's account books and ledgers if Deming has them.
Item 3: Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius, 1830 Dec 15Add to your cart.
Has heard from Mr. Bacon about the death of his sister; offers his condolences to Deming; asks Deming to thank Mr. Bacon for informing him and also for the trouble Bacon took in inquiring of Dr. Vanderburgh about a tumor Champion had on his neck; has been to Yale College to consult the medical faculty regarding his case; describes Dr. Hubbard's operation to remove the tumor; Dr. Morgan has dressed the wound and it looks as well as he expected.
Folder 11: Deed, Champion, Henry to Deming, Julius for land in Litchfield, Conn., 1784 May 25Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 8: Champion, JudahAdd to your cart.
Judah Champion (1729-1823) was the brother of the father-in-law of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1802 Jan-MarAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Judah to Deming, Julius, 1802 Jan 26Add to your cart.
Writes that while he sincerely condoles Deming's misfortunes, it is with peculiar pleasure that he repeatedly hears of Deming being as comfortable as can be reasonably expected; news of health of friends; Deming 's return to Litchfield will be gratifying to his family and friends.
Item 2: Champion, Judah to Deming, Julius, 1802 Feb 16Add to your cart.
Writes that he is glad to hear of Deming's recupertation; reports on his health; news of Deming's family and friends; Mr. Landon transported the two Indians from jail to New-Gate.
Item 3: Champion, Judah to Deming, Julius, 1802 Mar 2Add to your cart.
Writes that he is glad to hear that Deming is mending; news of health of Deming's family; news of friends; comments on politics.
Sub-Series 9: Champion, Lucretia HubbardAdd to your cart.
Lucretia Hubbard Champion (1760-1836) was the wife of Epaphroditus Champion and a sister-in-law of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Champion, Lucretia Hubbard to Deming, Dorothy, [1801?] Dec 16Add to your cart.
Encloses a ring to wear in remembrance of their dear departed Clarissa; remember Lucretia to Dorothy's mother as they have had similar trials; three of those that attended the dancing [school?] with her last winter are thought to be dead; inquires about Clarissa's history prize and compositions.
Sub-Series 10: Champion, ReubenAdd to your cart.
Reuben Champion (1759-1838) was a cousin of Julius Deming's wife Dorothy Champion Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Champion, Reuben to Deming, Julius, 1834 Aug 14Add to your cart.
Writes to ask Deming's assistance in his application for an American Revolutionary War pension; recounts his service; he is poor and needy.
Sub-Series 11: Cleaveland, Esther ChampionAdd to your cart.
Esther Champion Cleaveland (1766-1840) was the wife of Moses Cleaveland and a sister-in-law of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1793, 1812Add to your cart.
Item 1: Cleaveland, Esther Champion to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1793 Dec 23Add to your cart.
Writes that she is looking forward to her visit in Colchester; their faithful friend and sevant Sampson died; sister Storrs is starving herself to go to the ball.
Item 2: Cleaveland, Esther Champion to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1812 Sep 13Add to your cart.
Writes about their journey to Canterbury; news of family and friends; her toothache; have been looking over the volumes of the Turkish spy, an Arabian who resided in Paris. The letter includes a copy of the Turkish spy's letter.
Sub-Series 12: Deming, Abigail ChampionAdd to your cart.
Abigail Champion Deming (1787-1835), a daughter of Henry Champion (1751-1836), was the wife of David Deming and a niece of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1801, 1836Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Abigail Champion to Deming, Dorothy, 1801 NovAdd to your cart.
Writes about the death of Clarissa Champion; Aunt Champion would like her to copy the poetry, but she does not have it and asks for assistance.
Item 2: Deming, Abigail Champion to Deming, Julius, 1836 Jul 14Add to your cart.
Reports the death of her father.
Sub-Series 13: Deming, CharlesAdd to your cart.

Charles Deming (1789-1852) was the son of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.

Oversize and bound items are listed after the folder listing.

Folder 1: Correspondence, 1809-1814Add to your cart.
Item 1: Rush, Benjamin to [Deming, Charles], 1809 May 15Add to your cart.
Directions for treatment and a prescription for an illness.
Item 2: Miller, Edward to [Deming, Charles?], 1809 May 21Add to your cart.
Advice on treatment of an illness.
Item 3: Rush, Benjamin to Deming, Charles, 1810 Aug 6Add to your cart.
Advice on treatment of an illness.
Item 4: [?] to Deming, Charles, 1814 Aug 2Add to your cart.
Description of advice provided by Dr. Tracy for treatment of an illness.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1816-1824Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Charles to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1816 Aug 18Add to your cart.
Deming writes to his mother that he is back in New York after visiting Painesville, Ohio. He shot a porcupine to the surprise of Gov. Huntington's son and will send some quills at the first opportunity.
Item 2: Deming, Charles to Deming, Julius, 1819 Sep 14Add to your cart.
Deming writes to his father than yellow fever has broken out in New York and discusses arrangements he and family members are taking to leave the city.
Item 3: Deming, Charles to Deming, Julius, 1824 Dec 1Add to your cart.
Deming writes to his father regarding a business matter involving Collier, Smith, Holmes, Wolcott, and others.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1836-1837Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Charles to Root, Joel, 1836 Jan 7Add to your cart.
Inquires about the shipment of a barrel of sugar.
Item 2: Deming, Charles to Hand Ferris & Co., 1836 Jun 22Add to your cart.
Inquires about a carpet.
Item 3: Board of Relief of Litchfield to Deming, Charles, 1837 Jan 5Add to your cart.
Summons to appear regarding Deming's taxable estate.
Item 4: Deming, Charles and Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Julius, 1837 Jan 14Add to your cart.
Deming and his sister Lucretia write from Havana to their father regarding details of ships and shipping; they will set sail for Charleston tomorrow.
Item 5: Deming, Charles to Deming, Mary, 1837 Feb 28Add to your cart.
Writes to his sister from Augusta, Ga., offering condolences over the loss of Charles William; apologizes for keeping Lucretia away from you for so long; discusses the circumstances of the brig Pegasus; brief description of southern life and climate; inquires about Litchfield and their home.
Folder 4: Correspondence, 1838, 1840Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Charles to Deming, Mary and Deming, Lucretia, 1838 Jan 23Add to your cart.
Writes to his sisters that he fears their father is no longer among the living; discusses Mary's and Lucretia's care of their father; does not want father enclosed in furniture palmed off by Dewey.
Item 2: Deming, Charles to Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Mary, 1838 Jan 24Add to your cart.
Writes to his sisters regarding their father's declining health; wishes he could be there; sends regards of friends; expresses gratitude for care his sisters are giving their father.
Item 3: Deming, Charles to Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Mary, 1838 Jan 26Add to your cart.
Writes to his sisters regarding their father's death and funeral arrangements.
Item 4: Deming, Charles to Deming, Mary and Deming, Lucretia, 1838 Jan 29Add to your cart.
Writes to his sisters regarding their father's death; proving his will; brother Frederick serving as executor; encourages his sisters to join him in New York for the winter.
Item 5: Deming, Charles to Deming, Mary, 1840 Mar 21Add to your cart.
Writes to his sister of news from New York; wonders about her and Lucretia in Litchfield.
Folder 5: Correspondence, 1844-1847Add to your cart.
Item 1: Curtis, J[oseph] T[homas] to Deming, Charles, 1844 Dec 7Add to your cart.
One letter offering apology for the necessity of leaving the city. Curtis was Deming's physician and offers Dr. [John August] McVickar as his, "efficient substitute." Curtis and McVickar were early practicitioners of homeopathy.
Item 2: Smith, Truman to Deming, Charles, 1845 Nov 26Add to your cart.
Truman Smith writes from Washington enclosing a check (not included) and offering to attend to any other business he or his friends "desire to have done at the seat of government."
Item 3: Deming, Charles to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1846 Apr 23Add to your cart.
Writes to congratulate his nephew on the close of his winter term; hopes he will enjoy his return to Litchfield; explains he will pay tuition bills for Perkins from a fund he holds in trust for him, and requests that Mr. Russell make out his bill to Deming.
Item 4: Deming, Charles to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1846 Jun 8Add to your cart.
Writes to his nephew about leaving for New Haven the following day; will bring the funds Perkins requires; hopes to see Lucretia prior to his departure for Litchfield.
Item 5: Deming, Charles to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1847 Feb 10Add to your cart.
Letter regarding payment of tuition for Julius Deming Perkins.
Item 6: Deming, Charles to Deming, Lucretia, 1847 Apr 16Add to your cart.
Writes to Lucretia regarding the health of their sister Mary. He thinks she will not live much longer and wishes to urge her to forward a simple obituary to the newspapers as soon as possible following her decease. He suggests that she may wish to have Mr. or Mrs. Bacon review it, and that by doing so quickly, "it would preclude any other notice which might be written in bad taste." He goes on to report on his own health and treatment by Dr. [John August] McVickar. He calls him "attentive & kind" and notes that he brings him bread and oysters. Several lines of the letter appear to have been purposefully obscured by the recipient.
Item 7: Deming, Charles to Deming, Lucretia, 1847 Apr 19Add to your cart.
Letter to his sister Lucretia regarding his illness and the death of their sister Mary. He gives instructions about the internment, suggesting she keep the body as long as it suits her feelings and convenience but notes that there will be a "decisive change in the countenance, evidencing decomposition unless prevented by the application of ice." He requests that she procure all the best materials and everything suitable for the occassion. He notes that the will can be attended to after the funeral.
Item 8: Deming, Charles to Deming, Lucretia, 1847 Apr 21Add to your cart.
Charles mourns the loss of their sister Mary; provides the transcript of an obituary he sent to various papers; reports on his own health. Charles provides instructions for the settlement of Mary's estate.
Item 9: Deming, Charles to Deming, Lucretia, 1847 Apr 23Add to your cart.
Reports on the state of his health and urges his sister not to worry about him. Compliments her on the handling of their sister Mary's funeral and associated arrangements. Advises about proving the will. Mentions that he hasn't heard from their brother Frederick or his family for four weeks since Mary's death. Several lines of the letter appear to have been purposefully obscured by the recipient.
Item 10: Apthorp, E. C. to Deming, Charles, 1847 May 18Add to your cart.
Letter thanking Deming for his draft for one hundred and fifty four dollars to pay board and tuition for Deming's niece, Lucretia Deming Perkins.
Item 11: Ward, William A. to Deming, Charles, 1847 Jul 14Add to your cart.
Lettter from a dealer in paint, oil, dye and glass regarding an order.
Folder 6: Correspondence, 1849-1852Add to your cart.
Item 1: Swan, Benjamin to Deming, Charles, 1849 Dec 4Add to your cart.
Swan, minister of the First Congregational Church in Litchfield, writes to Deming to thank him for a recent gift. He expresses regret that he and his wife were unable to express their gratitude to his sister Mary prior to her death. He goes on to lament Deming's poor health and provide religious advise.
Item 2: Deming, Charles to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1850 Sep 5Add to your cart.
Urges Julius Deming Perkins to have his will written.
Item 3: Deming, Charles to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1851 Aug 26Add to your cart.
Writes from Litchfield about packing furniture to send to New York.
Item 4: Swan, Benjamin to Deming, Charles, 1852 Apr 9Add to your cart.
Expresses sorrow at learning of Deming's illness and offers to go to New York to administer communion if Deming should desire it.
Folder 7: Appointment of Charles Deming as sergeant, 1st Light Infantry Co., 17th Regiment of Militia, 1809 Sep 8Add to your cart.
Folder 8: Appointment of Charles Deming as ensign, Light Infantry Co., 17th Regiment of Militia, 1811 Apr 25Add to your cart.
Folder 9: Appointment of Charles Deming as lieutenant, Light Infantry Co., 17th Regiment of Militia, 1812 Apr 23Add to your cart.
Folder 10: Appointment of Charles Deming as captain, Light Infantry Co., 17th Regiment of Militia, 1812 Oct 10Add to your cart.
Folder 11: Financial and legal papers, account book #1, 1820-1829Add to your cart.
Documents transactions related to investments and stocks of Deming family members.
Folder 12: Financial and legal papers, account book #2, 1829-1836Add to your cart.
Documents general accounts and transactions regarding investments and stocks of members of the Deming family.
Folder 13: Financial and legal papers, accounts, 1841-1847Add to your cart.
Folder 14: Financial and legal papers, bills and receipts, 1811-1830Add to your cart.
Folder 15: Financial and legal papers, bills and receipts, 1831-1838Add to your cart.
Folder 16: Financial and legal papers, bills and receipts, 1839-1844Add to your cart.
Folder 17: Financial and legal papers, bills and receipts, 1845-1852Add to your cart.
Folder 18: Financial and legal papers, deed, 1848 Sep 18Add to your cart.
Folder 19: Financial and legal papers, notes related to a matter involving Mr. Holmes, 1824Add to your cart.
Folder 20: Financial and legal papers, wills and estate, 1839-1852Add to your cart.
Folder 21: Financial and legal papers, wills and estate, 1852Add to your cart.
Folder 22: Financial and legal papers, wills and estate, 1844, 1852Add to your cart.
Folder 23: Financial and legal papers, wills and estate, wrappersAdd to your cart.
Folder 24: Calling cards, 1840-1850Add to your cart.
A small packet of Charles Deming's calling cards, removed from a small leather wallet. (1950-01-14)
Item 1: Financial and legal papers, account book #3, 1836-1845Add to your cart.
Documents general accounts and transactions regarding investments and stocks of members of the Deming family and estates. Currently stored in 33B Box 23.
Item 2: Financial and legal papers, account book #4, 1845-1852Add to your cart.
Documents general accounts and transactions regarding investments and stocks of members of the Deming family and estates. Currently stored in 3B Box 23.
Sub-Series 14: Deming, CharlotteAdd to your cart.
Charlotte Deming (1868- ) was a granddaughter of William Deming (1792-1865), a son of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.
Folder 1: Miscellaneous Papers, 1886, 1914, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Receipt, Litchfield Lawn Club, 1886 Aug 27Add to your cart.
Receipt for invitation fee signed by C.H. Coit, Treasurer.
Item 2: Lachmund, Mathilde to Deming, Charlotte, 1914 Nov 30Add to your cart.
Postcard depicting Pine Tree Inn, Lakehurst, NJ. Thanks Charlotte for her letter and invites her to visit.
Item 3: White, S.E. to Deming, Charlotte, undatedAdd to your cart.
Invitation for supper.
Item 4: Stock List, undatedAdd to your cart.
Two pages listing stock certificates and number of shares.
Sub-Series 15: Deming, Clarissa ChampionAdd to your cart.
Clarissa Champion Deming (1872- ) was a granddaughter of Frederick Deming (1787-1860), a son of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.
Folder 1: Deming, Clarissa Champion to Smith, [?], 1907 Mar 26Add to your cart.
One letter written from Lakewood, NJ regarding a card case she would like to have made. Mentions the weather and her plans to return to Litchfield in the spring.
Sub-Series 16: Deming, DorothyAdd to your cart.
Dorothy Deming (1784-1835) was a daughter of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming. She is sometimes referred to as "Dolly."
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1801-1802Add to your cart.
Item 1: Storrs, Eliza to Dorothy Deming, 1801 Oct 26Add to your cart.
Writes that Clarissa Champion has died.
Item 2: Brainerd, Mary to Deming, Dorothy, 1802 MayAdd to your cart.
Writes regarding the death of Clarissa Champion.
Item 3: [?], Vira to Deming, Dorothy, 1802 JunAdd to your cart.
Vira, a former slave owned by Dorothy Champion Deming, writes that she is glad to see Charles and Dorothy's father; encloses back and sleeves of a gown of the latest fashion; discusses her activities.
Item 4: Woodbridge, William to Deming, Dorothy, 1802 Nov 22Add to your cart.
Invites her to accompany him to the ball.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1804-1817Add to your cart.
Item 1: Brainerd, Mary to Deming, Dorothy, 1804 FebAdd to your cart.
Writes about attending  the assembly; news of family and friends.
Item 2: Champion, Lucretia to Deming, Dorothy, 1804 Mar 15Add to your cart.
Writes that she has returned to Middletown; details of trip; her health; she is planning a ball in April; ordination.
Item 3: Storrs, Eliza to Deming, Dorothy, 1805 Aug 9Add to your cart.
Writes that she is disappointed Deming will not be coming to Middletown; news of family and friends.
Item 4: Deming, Dorothy to Deming, Charles, 1817Add to your cart.
Writes to her brother regarding health of their father and other news of their parents; state of fruits and vegetables; intends visiting Burlington this fall with Miss Pierce; news of friends; Vira will know what kind of hat or bonnet she would like; acquiring some cambric for her; health of Gov. Wolcott; two trials upcoming for capital punishment.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1834-1835Add to your cart.
Item 1: Bacon, Lucretia Champion to Deming, Dorothy and Deming, Lucretia, 1834 Feb 1Add to your cart.
Writes with news of friends and family; their minister has spent much time away attending a meeting; brother James' deplores the stupidity and ignorance into which New York City has fallen.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy to Deming, Mary, 1835 Apr 24Add to your cart.
Writes to her sister that her health has improved; appreciates the trunk and its truly acceptable articles.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy to Deming, Mary, 1835 Apr 26Add to your cart.
Writes that she is not experiencing the pain or suffering as her sisters may imagine; the morphine eased the smarting of the surgeon's knife; her appetite is better; Dr. Van. is treating her; Dr. Bushe visits regularly. The letter also contains a fragment of a note probably added by Lucretia Deming reporting that there is next to nothing to be be done in the way of nursing.
Item 4: Deming, Dorothy to Deming, Mary, 1835 Apr 29Add to your cart.
Writes regarding her appreciation of her father's solicitude on her account; postponing her visit to Litchfield; inquires about her relatives; has has another quiet night; the healing pains have been slight in her case. Lucretia Deming adds a note regarding the Boston chair and Dorothy's condition.
Item 5: Deming, Dorothy to Deming, Mary, 1835 Jun 29Add to your cart.
Writes regarding their plans to return to Litchfield on Thursday next.
Folder 4: Financial and legal papers, bills and receipts, 1825-1835Add to your cart.
Folder 5: Financial and legal papers, stock book, 1815-1835Add to your cart.
Lists stocks owned by Deming and their values and funds given to her by her father.
Folder 6: Financial and legal papers, will and estate, 1833-1836Add to your cart.
Folder 7: Financial and legal papers, will and estate, 1836-1838Add to your cart.
Folder 8: Invitations, 1799-1810, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 9: Memorial to Mary Brainerd, 1806 AprAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 17: Deming, Dorothy ChampionAdd to your cart.
Dorothy Champion Deming (1759-1830) was the wife of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1799, 1803Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Julius, Jr., 1799 Jun 20Add to your cart.
Writes to her son that Julius Deming (Sr.) saw Vira in New Haven; discusses Vira; Miss Sally has a school ball; Independence begins to make a noise; news of friends and family.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Julius, Jr., 1799 Jul 21Add to your cart.
Writes with news of friends and family; encloses articles regarding American independence; admonishes him not engage in political disputes, but cultivate his understanding and obtain useful knowledge, expecting that he will always support the government and Constitution of his county.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Dorothy, 1803 May 27Add to your cart.
Writes that Julius Deming (Sr.) will set out for Dorothy 4 weeks after she left home; additional visits she should or will make; has not heard from Dorothy and concludes she is fatiqued or unwell; Dorothy should be of assistance in any little domestic matter when she is visiting; news of family, friends, and Litchfield students. This letter also has a listing of 4 dates and activities possibly written by Dorothy Deming.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1806-1815Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Dorothy, 1806 May 20Add to your cart.
Writes that after Dorothy's hurried departure, the store was completely ransacked of all its useless goods and the house supplied therewith; matter are now settled and Fred begins to proceed to business; she has a large chest full of remnants; thinks Dorothy will need a new bonnet; describes fashionable bonnets she saw in Litchfield; news of family and friends.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy Champion to F. & C. Deming & Co., 1819 Jun 27Add to your cart.
Writes that Julius Deming is gradually getting better and describes his condition; the family except for him is in perfect health.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy Champion and [Deming, Dorothy?] to Deming, Charles, 1815 Oct 30Add to your cart.
Writes that they are glad that Charles has escaped the danger to which he had been exposed by accident; glad Frederick has recovered from influenza; health of family; discussed a political matter involving Mr. Smith, Mr. Bacon, Mr. Gould, and Mr. Daggett; will be judging the first prize in Miss Pierce's school. [Dorothy Deming?] wonders if her brothers have received a letter in which mama enclosed a recipe of Dr. Sheldon; concerned about Charles and influezna; suggests Charles now has a fellow feeling for Miss Ogden when she choked herself.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1816Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Charles, 1816 AugAdd to your cart.
News of friends and family.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy Champion to F. & C. Deming & Co., 1816 Sep 3Add to your cart.
News of family and friends; requests that they send the listed articles.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy Champion and Deming, Clarissa to Deming, Dolly, 1816 Oct 1Add to your cart.
Writes to thank Dorothy for her letter about her travels and health of her brothers; sorry to hear of the extraction of two of Frederick's teeth; death of Mrs. Lyman Beecher.
Item 4: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Dorothy, 1816 Oct 3Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
Continues her account of the death of Mrs. Lyman Beecher started in her Oct. 1, 1816, letter; her new girl is working out better than she expected; can Dorothy bring some cranberries; inquires about little Mary and Vira.
Folder 4: Correspondence, 1817-1818Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Dorothy Champion to F. & C. Deming & Co., 1817 May 2Add to your cart.
Writes that their papa thinks Mr. Webb is a worthy and respectable man; news of family and friends.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming Dorothy, 1817 [Oct 25]Add to your cart.
News of family; reports the death of Dorothy's grandmother, Mehitabel Champion Deming.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Dorothy, [1818?] May 6Add to your cart.
Charles and William arrived; health of Charles; news of family; [Phila?] is here for two days serving.
Item 4: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Julius, 1819 Aug 13Add to your cart.
Writes about the health of the little child; condition of Clarissa; news and health of other family members.
Item 5: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Julius, 1819 Aug 16Add to your cart.
Reports the death of the infant Julius Deming of Clarissa Deming Perkins.
Item 6: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Julius, 1819 Aug 23Add to your cart.
Reports further on the death of the infant of Clarissa Deming Perkins; Clarissa's condition and treatment; visitors.
Folder 5: Correspondence, 1820, 1825, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Dorothy, 1820 Feb 15Add to your cart.
News of family and friends; discusses a court case; a case in which Julius Deming testified; their recent missionary meeting; visitors and difficulty of lodging; her blinds could use new stringing; Antha Bissell and her sister would be glad to engage with Frederick; her girl Clara continues to do well. The letter also contains a statement regarding a payment made by James Kellogg signed by Charles Deming.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Dorothy, 1825 Sep 14Add to your cart.
Writes that they have arrived safely, but heard that the road to Middletown is bad; their travel plans; discusses Dorothy's Van Dyke and Clarissa's work; observed a gentleman and lady of handsome appearance dressed in decent style.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy Champion to Deming, Mary, undatedAdd to your cart.
Received Mary's letter from Farmington; Frederick's business travels; Dorothy's health; Mary should take care of her health; visitors; news of friends.
Sub-Series 18: Deming, Frederick (1787-1860)Add to your cart.
Frederick Deming (1787-1860) was a son of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.
Folder 1: 1818-1847Add to your cart.
Item 1: Correspondence, Deming, Frederick to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1818 May 23Add to your cart.
Writes to his mother regarding articles he is shipping to Litchfield; health of his family; his wife has decided not to go to Litchfield because she would not enjoy all the noise and tumult created by the company expected there.
Item 2: Correspondence, Deming, Frederic to Deming Julius, 1836 Mar 31Add to your cart.
Writes to his father regarding an accounting of money he will be forwarding; health of his family.
Item 3: Financial statement, 1846-1847Add to your cart.
Item 4: Receipt from Wolcott & Huntington for subscription for Col. Trumbull prints of the Declaration of Independence, 1823 Sep 26Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 19: Deming, Frederick, Jr. (1832- )Add to your cart.
Frederick Deming, Jr. (1832- ) was a son of Frederick Deming (1787-1860) and a grandson of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.
Item 1: Stock book, 1870-1892Add to your cart.
Currently housed in 3B Box 23.
Sub-Series 20: Deming, JonathanAdd to your cart.
Jonathan Deming (1743-1788) was a brother of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Deming, Jonathan to Deming, Julius, 1781 Jun 2Add to your cart.
Reports the death of their father.
Sub-Series 21: Deming, Julius (1755-1838)Add to your cart.
Julius Deming (1755-1838) was married to Dorothy Champion Deming. They had eight children: Julius, Dorothy, Frederick, Charles, William, Clarissa, Mary, and Lucretia.
Sub-Series 1: CorrespondenceAdd to your cart.
Correspondence in this sub-series is arranged alphabetically by correspondent. Incoming and outgoing letters are interfiled and arranged chronologically. See the Military papers sub-series for correspondence related to the American Revolutionary War.
Folder 1: A, 1790, 1837, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Allen, John from Deming, Julius, 1790 Apr 23Add to your cart.
Discusses instructions given to American envoys in Paris, the French Republic, and Federalists.
Item 2: Allen, Ursula to Deming, Julius, undatedAdd to your cart.
Asks Deming to accept an accompanying small present in recognition of her gratitude for the kindness Deming showed her late husband.
Item 3: Armstrong, William J. to Deming, Julius, 1837 Jul 8Add to your cart.
Solicitation on behalf of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions.
Folder 2: B, 1820-1834Add to your cart.
Item 1: Bacon, Asa to Deming, Julius, 1834 Dec 22Add to your cart.
Reports the death of Epaphroditus Champion.
Item 2: Buell, Ozias to Deming, Julius, 1821 Oct 13Add to your cart.
Encloses a note against C. R. Johnson and asks Deming's assistance in its collection.
Item 3: Bulkley, Silas to Deming, Julius, 1823 Jan 16Add to your cart.
Asks if Deming would forward to him two or three Bibles for benevolent purposes, should Deming have any on hand for that object.
Item 4: Burr, Horace from Deming, Julius, 1820 Aug 24Add to your cart.
Regarding a land transaction involving Joseph Adams.
Folder 3: Champion, Epaphroditus, 1803-1834Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Epaphroditus from Deming, Julius, 1803 Dec 8Add to your cart.
Received the information regarding their mutual friend's financial problems; he is interested in investing in the Western Reserve property owned by their friend, but he is not knowledgable about it and would need to learn more; Frederick is in school and Deming has no assistance in the store aside from what little help Charles provides, so he is unable to leave Litchfield; would give him pleasure to see Champion in Litchfield this winter and yet hopes to see him with their wives in New York and give them an opportunity to pick up some little things to please them.
Item 2: Champion, Epaphroditus from Deming, Julius, 1804 Apr 7Add to your cart.
Outlines his plans to travel to New York.
Item 3: Champion, Epaphroditus from Deming, Julius, 1808 Apr 12Add to your cart.
Received the packets; the remaining sheets of the Presidents commemortation will be very acceptable; discusses local reaction to the embargoes; results of recent election; has some anxiety over how Mr. Champagne's last letter was received by Congress.
Item 4: Champion, Epaphroditus from Deming, Julius, 1824 May 24Add to your cart.
Requests Champion to pay Mrs. Harriet's bill, after which he will repay Champion.
Item 5: Champion, Epaphroditus from Deming, Julius, 1834 Feb 22Add to your cart.
Writes regarding his application for an American Revolutionary War pension.
Folder 4: Ch, 1795, 1834Add to your cart.
Item 1: Champion, Henry from Deming, Julius, 1795 Aug 20Add to your cart.
Regarding their business arrangement to import horses.
Item 2: Champion, Henry from Deming, Julius, 1795 Dec 5Add to your cart.
Regarding their business arrangement to import horses.
Item 3: Champion, Reuben from Deming, Julius, 1834 Aug 20Add to your cart.
Recounts his and Reuben Champion's father's service in the American Revolutionary War; is unable to aid Champion in his effort to obtain a pension because he has no knowledge of Champion's appointment as a drover.
Folder 5: Ch-Cl, 1778-1836Add to your cart.
Item 1: Charlton, Jesse to Deming, Julius, 1836 Aug 18Add to your cart.
Asks if Deming recollections the services of Samuel Wolcott during the American Revolutionary War in order to secure a pension.
Item 2: Charlton, Jesse from Deming, Julius, 1836 Aug 22Add to your cart.
Writes that he has no recollection of Samuel Wolcott during the American Revolutionary War and suggests Samuel Gray may have such knowledge.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1802 Jan 7Add to your cart.
Reports to his wife that he has been thrown from his horse and broken his hip; requests Dr. Samuel Catlin to come as quickly as possible. Written by Elizabeth Clapp.
Item 4: Clapp, Elizabeth to Deming, Julius and Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1802 Apr 2Add to your cart.
She has received their letters and garden seeds; comments on Deming being removed in a litter; they are often in her memory since leaving; news of weather and friends; hopes to see them again.
Folder 6: Collier, Thomas to Deming, Julius, 1789 Feb 16Add to your cart.
As soon as Collier has a moment's leisure, he will wait upon Deming, as he esteems Deming very highly.
Folder 7: Colton, Benjamin, 1837 Jul-SepAdd to your cart.
Four letters related to the application of the widow of Henry Deming, one of Julius Deming's brothers, for an American Revolutionary War pension.
Folder 8: Day, Thomas to Deming, Julius and his children, 1799 Aug 19Add to your cart.
Has read in the Litchfield paper the news of the death of Deming's son and offers his condolences.
Folder 9: Deming family, 1784Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Asa from Deming, Julius, 1784 Jun 9Add to your cart.
Writes to his brother regarding a shipment of goods; his passage on board the Brig John for Bristol; does not know when he will return, but hopes within five months; directs Asa to conduct his business in the best manner he can.
Item 2: Deming, Asa from Julius Deming, 1784 Aug 1Add to your cart.
Has been in London for ten days; is purchasing goods and arranging for shipment; expects to return for home in mid-September; provides advise on present stock of goods and acquiring more; advises Asa on the purchase of potash, West India goods, and other business matters.
Item 3: Deming, Asa from Deming, Julius, 1784 Aug 9Add to your cart.
Writes from London that he expects to be back mid-November with a very good assortment of goods; directs Asa on purchases of potash and other goods he wishes Asa to make; discusses other business matters.
Folder 10: Deming family, 1791, 1834Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Charles from Deming, Julius, 1834 May 11Add to your cart.
Hopes that he would return to health before this; health of family; discusses a Phoenix Bank matter that involves Col. Tallmadge and John Delafield.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy from Deming, Julius, 1791 Jan 11Add to your cart.
Has received her letter; his plans to return to Litchfield.
Folder 11: Deming family, 1784 Jun-AugAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1784 Jun 8Add to your cart.
Hopes her health is better and reports on his own; provides advice about young Julius; leaving on the brig John for Bristol.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1784 Aug 8Add to your cart.
Has arrived in good health in London; advises her to keep herself healthy; discusses their son; expects to return mid-November; discusses weather; will reserve all he has to tell her until he sees her again.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1784 Aug 9Add to your cart.
Writes from London that he has arrived three weeks ago in good health; she should take care of herself; discusses their son; this is the second letter he has sent; expects to be home in mid-November; not as good living here as a boarder than in Boston or New York; describes his boarding circumstances; describes weather.
Folder 12: Deming family, 1784 Sep-DecAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1784 Sep 23Add to your cart.
Writes from London that the ship on which he was planning to return to America has been delayed and he does not expect to arrive by mid-November as he planned; he plans to sail on the Masborough.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1786 Dec 14Add to your cart.
Writes from New York that he is glad to hear that she and their son are well; reports he had a most severe passage of 74 days; they were cast away on the south side of Long Island; describes his ordeal; the passengers were all saved; it is with great uneasiness that he waits at this place to conclude his business as he expects the ship lost most of its cargo; hopes to be home in a fortnight.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1784 Dec 17Add to your cart.
Writes from New York that he is unhappy to be detained, but expects to leave in 10 or 12 days.
Folder 13: Deming family, 1799-1818Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, [1799 Aug 1?]Add to your cart.
Writes from New Haven that their son is very ill; she and Dr. Sheldon should come.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, [1799 Aug 6?]Add to your cart.
Writes from New Haven about their son's severe illness, treatments, and Dr. Munson's attention.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1818 Oct 14Add to your cart.
He is distressed to hear of Clarissa's illness; is glad Clarissa is getting the best nursing, but he is anxious that Dorothy return to Litchfield; he would be eager to come if it is of the least service to any of them, his presence at home is of some use; news of family and friends.
Item 4: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1818 Nov 4Add to your cart.
Writes that he is home; details his journey, people seen, and business conducted; family's concern for Clarissa; a black girl is added to their kitchen but she is not one of the first three.
Item 5: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1818 Nov 9Add to your cart.
They are all glad to hear Clarissa is getting better; discusses Clarissa's condition; nothing of news to write; their kitchen progresses well; Lucy the black girl is young and does as well as she can; discusses routine of the household help; news of family; description of Litchfield County cattle & household manufactures show recently held.
Folder 14: Deming family, 1819, 1823Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Dorothy Champion and children from Deming, Julius, 1819 Aug 23Add to your cart.
Writes to express his condolences regarding the death of Clarissa's infant son Julius; news of family's health.
Item 2: Deming, Dorothy Champion and family from Deming, Julius, 1819 Nov 7Add to your cart.
Writes from New York about Charles' health; news of family.
Item 3: Deming, Dorothy Champion from Deming, Julius, 1823 Aug 14Add to your cart.
Writes from Champion, N.Y., that he arrived there; will rest and conduct no business; has not made any inquiries respecting his business.
Folder 15: Deming family, 1817-1819, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: F. & C. Deming & Co. from Deming, Julius, 1817 Jun 17Add to your cart.
Writes that the family is well, but he is still has pain in his head; on Dr. Sheldon's advice he has sent for Dr. Smith of New Haven to perform an operation on his jaw; encloses for Frederick money collected on his debts.
Item 2: F. & C. Deming & Co. from Deming, Julius, 1817 Oct 24Add to your cart.
Reports the death of his mother.
Item 3: F. & C. Deming & Co. from Deming, Julius, 1819 Mar 7Add to your cart.
Bemoans the current state of politics in Connecticut and Litchfield; discusses his opinions of candidates; recounts ballotting; alas, poor Connecticut, lost! lost! lost!; encloses money collected for Frederick.
Item 4: Deming, William and siblings from Deming, Julius and Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1818 NovAdd to your cart.
Julius writes that Clarissa is more comfortable; so much time has passed since the operation that the fatal symptoms so much feared have passed; he will leave for home on Monday; gives Seymour farm instructions. Dorothy writes that Clarissa's prospects for recovery are much more promising.
Item 5: "My dear daughter" from Deming, Julius, undatedAdd to your cart.
Indicates his preference for a coffin.
Folder 16: E, 1810, 1824Add to your cart.
Item 1: Eliot, Andrew to Deming, Julius, 1824 Jun 30Add to your cart.
Inquiries about Bibles produced by the Connecticut Bible Society.
Item 2: Ellsworth, Martin to Deming, Julius, 1810 Sep 17Add to your cart.
A letter of reference for William Loomis.
Folder 17: Ellsworth, William W., 1813-1823Add to your cart.
Six letters regarding Ellsworth's note held by Deming, 1813-1816; one letter regarding Deming's attendance at a Hartford Bank stockholder's meeting, 1823.
Folder 18: G, 1816, 1837Add to your cart.
Item 1: Goodwin, George from Deming, Julius, 1816 Jun 17Add to your cart.
Believes that the vote of the stockholders of the Hartford Bank authorizing the issuance of post notes is ruinous to the stockholders and injurious to the public wishes to record his disapprobation of the project of issuing depreciated paper currency.
Item 2: Guedron, John B. to Deming, Julius, 1837 Jun 17Add to your cart.
Writes from Augusta regarding Deming's use of team of horses; everything is good order except the horses were very much pulled down; Deming has made an error in his calculation of average mileage per day according to their agreement for use of a team; submits a recalculation for Deming's approbation.
Item 3: Guedron, John B. from Deming, Julius, 1837 Aug 25Add to your cart.
Pleased that the William the coachman returned without incident; the horses were used with great care while he was with them; remarks on distances covered; does not find any error in his calculations in his account of distance covered; provides an accounting; is convinced there is no mistake; encloses $25, which is nearly $5 over Guerdon's estimate.
Folder 19: Hubbard, Noadiah, 1807-1808Add to your cart.
3 letters. Hubbard served as Deming's agent and correspondent regarding land transactions in Champion, N.Y.
Folder 20: Hubbard, Noadiah, 1814-1823Add to your cart.
8 letters. Hubbard served as Deming's agent and correspondent regarding land transactions in Champion, N.Y.
Folder 21: Hubbard, Noadiah, 1826-1830Add to your cart.
10 letters. Hubbard served as Deming's agent and correspondent regarding land transactions in Champion, N.Y.
Folder 22: Hubbard, Noadiah, 1831-1835Add to your cart.
9 letters. Hubbard served as Deming's agent and correspondent regarding land transactions in Champion, N.Y.
Folder 23: H-J, 1833Add to your cart.
Item 1: Huntington, Jabez W. from Deming, Julius, 1833 Feb 21Add to your cart.
Writes regarding the collection of his interest on stock of the United States.
Item 2: J. L. & N. L. Griswold to Deming, Julius, 1833 Feb 3Add to your cart.
Asks if Deming has any information on a firm existing in some part of Connecticut under the title of Joel Deming & Son.
Item 3: J. L. & N. L. Griswold from Deming, Julius, 1833 Feb 12Add to your cart.
Reports that he has never before heard the name of Joel Deming nor any firm of Joel Deming & Son.
Folder 24: King, Rufus H., 1829, 1831Add to your cart.
Three letters regarding sums deposited with King by Noadiah Hubbard on behalf of Deming.
Folder 25: Lansing, Robert, 1833-1834Add to your cart.
Three letters regarding transactions involving Lansing and Noadiah Hubbard on behalf of Deming.
Folder 26: Lyman, Joseph, 1823 Feb-MarAdd to your cart.
Two letters regarding an obligation Deming holds against Lyman.
Folder 27: McCurdy, Lynde, 1801 Mar-AprAdd to your cart.
3 letters. McCurdy's daughter is planning to marry a man in Litchfield, but has heard that he is habitually inclined to intemperance. McCurdy seeks Deming's opinion of the man. Deming replies that information is false and that he holds the man in high regard. McCurdy expresses his gratitude for the very favorable recommendation. Although not stated in the letters, the man is John Allen, who married McCurdy's daughter Ursula.
Folder 28: O-P, 1799-1834Add to your cart.
Item 1: Oliver Wolcott and Company to Deming, Julius, 1803 Feb 2Add to your cart.
Announcement signed by Oliver Wolcott, James Watson, Moses Rogers, Archibald Gracie, and William W. Woolsey that a commercial establishment will be commenced in New York on Mar. 15, 1803, under the firm of Oliver Wolcott and Company.
Item 2: Penfield, Daniel to Deming, Julius, 1834 Jul 29Add to your cart.
Writes regarding a pension for service in the American Revolutionary Way; recounts his activities; asks for Deming's view of his claim.
Item 3: Penfield, Daniel from Deming, Julius, 1834 Aug 7Add to your cart.
Deming explains his understanding of the pension law, but is unable to render an opinion about Penfield's claim.
Item 4: Perkins, Charles from Deming, Julius, 1826 May 29Add to your cart.
Writes to his son-in-law regarding his experiences investing in banks; the failure of Eagle Bank in New Haven and its effects on other banks has prevented him distributing his wealth to his family members; has no cash on hand but for small family expenses; his confidence in bank stocks has been diminishing; banks are dependent on sound management; Perkins has written that he has concluded to settle in Rochester; Deming advises him to apply the correct attention, with ability, and the strictest integrity.
Item 5: Perit, Ruth from Deming, Julius, 1799 Sep 9Add to your cart.
Has received her letter and the articles she sent; the circumstances which made their families acquainted can never be forgotten; expresses his profound gratitude to her and her family; the books for her daughter have been collected and he will bring them to New Haven in a week or two.
Item 6: Perit, Ruth from Deming, Julius, 1799 Sep 9Add to your cart.
Draft of letter sent Sep. 9, 1799.
Folder 29: Reeve, Tapping, 1823 AprAdd to your cart.
Writes regarding a financial matter.
Folder 30: Rogers & Bromfield, 1784 Sep-DecAdd to your cart.
6 letters. Rogers & Bromfield served as Deming's agents in London for the importing and exporting of goods. The letters document in detail the items involved, costs, shipping arrangements, payments and related matters.
Folder 31: Rogers & Bromfield, 1785 Feb-MarAdd to your cart.
6 letters. Rogers & Bromfield served as Deming's agents in London for the importing and exporting of goods. The letters document in detail the items involved, costs, shipping arrangements, payments and related matters.
Folder 32: Rogers & Bromfield, 1785 Apr-JulAdd to your cart.
8 letters. Rogers & Bromfield served as Deming's agents in London for the importing and exporting of goods. The letters document in detail the items involved, costs, shipping arrangements, payments and related matters.
Folder 33: Rogers & Bromfield, 1785 Aug-NovAdd to your cart.
9 letters. Rogers & Bromfield served as Deming's agents in London for the importing and exporting of goods. The letters document in detail the items involved, costs, shipping arrangements, payments and related matters.
Folder 34: Rogers & Bromfield, 1786 Jan-NovAdd to your cart.
10 letters. Rogers & Bromfield served as Deming's agents in London for the importing and exporting of goods. The letters document in detail the items involved, costs, shipping arrangements, payments and related matters.
Folder 35: Rogers, Daniel Denison, 1786Add to your cart.
4 letters. Rogers has come to America and writes to Deming regarding his business with Rogers & Bromfield.
Folder 36: Rogers, Daniel Denison, 1823Add to your cart.
Item 1: Rogers, Daniel Denison to Deming, Julius, 1823 Sep 27Add to your cart.
The Litchfield Law School has obtained so much reputation that he is very desirous that a son of his should attend; asks for information.
Item 2: Rogers, Daniel Denison to Deming, Julius, 1823 Dec 27Add to your cart.
His son is greatly affected by the death of his fellow student Mr. Stevens; is concerned about his son's health in the cold and asks Deming's advice about how his son can avoid sickness; if his son is taken sick and unable to write would Deming have the goodness to give him the earliest information possible.
Item 3: Rogers, Daniel Denison from Deming, Julius, 1823 Dec 31Add to your cart.
Discusses the death of Mr. Stevens; law students' boarding arrangements; is unable to say what is the healthiest arrangement; has become somewhat acquainted with Rogers' son and is pleased with him; Rogers' son has spent an evening or two at his house with others since the death of Mr. Stevens and appeared in good health and spirits; offers to give Rogers' son advice on boarding; if any accident or indisposition should render it necessary, he will give Rogers the earliest information.
Folder 37: Rogers, Joseph to Deming, Julius, 1822 Nov 18Add to your cart.
Writes regarding receipt of an order, an enclosed order apparently sent by mistake, and an account of Bibles sent to Rev. Dr. Flint.
Folder 38: S, circa 1790-1808Add to your cart.
Item 1: Seymour, Moses to Deming, Julius, 1801 Oct 24Add to your cart.
Reports the death of Gen. Epaphroditus Champion's daughter.
Item 2: Sigourney, Charles to Deming, Julius, 1823 Jan 21Add to your cart.
He has for sale forty shares of the stock of the Hartford Bank belonging to one of his sisters who is leaving the country, and he wants to know if Deming is interested in purchasing them.
Item 3: Skinner, Abraham to Deming, Julius, 1799 Oct 19Add to your cart.
Discusses business transactions regarding horses.
Item 4: Sprats, William to Deming, Julius, circa 1790Add to your cart.
If Deming has not employed a mason to work on his house next summer, he would do well to employ John Allen; he has been to Middletown and seen Mr. Hubbard's house and shall be able to give Deming a plan of it as soon as he sees Deming.
Item 5: Stanley, Frederick to Deming, Julius, 1808 Oct 5Add to your cart.
Wishes to borrow $4,000; discusses his circumstances and proposes terms.
Folder 39: Tallmadge, Benjamin, 1806-1829Add to your cart.
Item 1: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Deming, Julius, 1806 Jan 10Add to your cart.
Reports on christening bowls and silver wares; discusses his correspondence with Oliver Wolcott about obtaining a silver bowl. Handwritten copy of the original letter.
Item 2: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Deming, Julius, 1807 Oct 12Add to your cart.
Called on Nathan Beers, steward of Yale College, who has consented to take oversight of their two sons; discusses acquiring and paying for wood and furniture; advised Beers their boys will be coming down and he agreed to take care of them until they can be accommodated in college.
Item 3: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Deming, Julius, 1829 Jul 1Add to your cart.
Encloses a paper that all members of their church should see; asks Deming to show it to Frederick Deming and Luke Lewis and wife and return it to Tallmadge and he will give it a circulation.
Folder 40: Terry, Nathaniel, 1814, 1816Add to your cart.
Four letters related to the activities of the Hartford Bank.
Folder 41: Tracy, Uriah, 1798, 1800Add to your cart.
Item 1: Tracy, Uriah to Deming, Julius, 1798 Mar 7Add to your cart.
Encloses a message from the President of the United States; discusses British treaty; counts of Federalists and Democrats in Congress; fears devastation of the East India men, but they hope to get out our frigates in a month; the government was never in more need of the support of all men who have property, influence, and principles; not fearful of events if they can unite.
Item 2: Tracy, Uriah to Deming, Julius, 1798 Dec 18Add to your cart.
Reports on the comissioners on the direct tax; delivered Deming's letter to Mr. Wheeden and sent it on to Virginia under direction to Mr. Tinsley.
Folder 42: W, 1803-1836Add to your cart.
Item 1: Wheelock, J. L. to Deming, Julius, 1830 Jun 25Add to your cart.
Solicitation on behalf of Washbash College and Teachers' Seminary, Indiana.
Item 2: Wolcott, Frederick from Deming, Julius, 1831 Jun 27Add to your cart.
Because Wolcott has been provided for membership into this church, Deming writes that it is his desire that the alienation of feeling as well as the discontinuation of friendly intercourse that has for some years manifested itself between them be happily terminated.
Item 3: Wolcott, Frederick to Deming, Julius, 1831 Jun 27Add to your cart.
Received Deming's letter with strong emotions of gratitude and with a heartfelt desire to reciprocate the Christian feelings Deming suggested and entertained.
Sub-Series 2: Financial and legal papersAdd to your cart.
Oversize items are listed after the folder listing.
Folder 1: Accounts, 1795-1822Add to your cart.
Folder 2: Bills and receipts, 1781-1782Add to your cart.
Folder 3: Bills and receipts, 1784-1819Add to your cart.
Folder 4: Bills and receipts, 1820-1824Add to your cart.
Folder 5: Bills and receipts, 1825-1829Add to your cart.
Folder 6: Bills and receipts, 1830-1832Add to your cart.
Folder 7: Bills and receipts, 1833-1834Add to your cart.
Folder 8: Bills and receipts, 1835-1838, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 9: Bonds, 1797, 1800Add to your cart.
Folder 10: Collier, Thomas, petition to the legislature to grant him an act of insolvency, 1808 Apr 3Add to your cart.
Folder 11: Champion, N.Y., deeds, 1810, 1823Add to your cart.
Folder 12: Champion, N.Y., land transaction papers, 1807-1810Add to your cart.
Folder 13: Champion, N.Y., land transaction papers, 1811-1827Add to your cart.
Folder 14: Champion, N.Y., land transaction papers, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 15: County of Litchfield, 1807 Jun 27Add to your cart.
Folder 16: Court house construction papers, 1795-1797Add to your cart.
Item 1: Commission to Julius Deming to build a court house, 1795 Dec 18Add to your cart.
Item 2: Receipt, William Sprats to Julius Deming, 1796 Jan 14Add to your cart.
7 shillings and 6 pence for 1 1/2 days assisting in making a plan for a court house.
Item 3: Dimensions and manners of finishing the court house to be erected in Litchfield, circa 1796 JanAdd to your cart.
Written by Julius Deming. Specifies, in part, that William Sprats, if he can be procured, must have the care and direction of doing the joiner work of the house.
Item 4: Contract between Julius Deming and Alexander Catlin and Moses Catlin to build and complete a court house in Litchfield, 1796 Mar 21Add to your cart.
Item 5: List and cost of materials, circa 1796 MarAdd to your cart.
Item 6: Receipt for building expenses, 1796 May 3Add to your cart.
Item 7: Receipts for bulding expenses, 1796 May-DecAdd to your cart.
Item 8: Receipts for building expenses, 1797 Jan-JunAdd to your cart.
Item 9: Court order regarding the site of the new court house, 1797 Mar 24Add to your cart.
Item 10: Agreement between Elijah Wadsworth et al. and Alexander Catlin regarding banking at the site of the new court house, 1797 Jun 8Add to your cart.
Folder 17: Court house construction, wrappersAdd to your cart.
Folder 18: Deeds, 1799, 1804Add to your cart.
Item 1: Moss, Amos to Deming, Julius for land in Litchfield, Conn., 1799 Apr 16Add to your cart.
Item 2: Leavitt, David, Jr. to Deming, Julius for land in Litchfield, Conn., 1804 Jun 21Add to your cart.
Folder 19: Papers regarding fences, 1798-1835Add to your cart.
Folder 20: Emancipation of Vira, a servant girl, 1801 Apr 6Add to your cart.
Signed by James Morris, Justice of the Peace, and John Welch and James Marsh, Selectmen.
Folder 21: Execution, Julius Deming vs. John Barber, 1785 Aug 29Add to your cart.
Folder 22: Inventory, 1815Add to your cart.
Folder 23: Justice of the peace papers, 1810-1811Add to your cart.
Folder 24: Land survey, 1810 Feb 27Add to your cart.
Folder 25: Lawsuit, Wadsworth & Kirby et al. v. Julius Deming, 1797-1803Add to your cart.
Folder 26: Lawsuit, Wadsworth & Kirby et al. v. Julius Deming, 1805, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 27: Lease, John Bellows, 1781, 1786Add to your cart.
Folder 28: Lists of notes, 1808-1824Add to your cart.
Folder 29: London trade papers, 1783-1784Add to your cart.
Papers regarding Deming's London trade and business dealings with Rogers & Bromfield, including bills of lading, insurance papers, statements of account, invoices, shipping documents, and the like. See the Correspondence sub-series for correspondence related to these matters.
Folder 30: London trade papers, 1785 Jan-MarAdd to your cart.
Papers regarding Deming's London trade and business dealings with Rogers & Bromfield, including bills of lading, insurance papers, statements of account, invoices, shipping documents, and the like. See the Correspondence sub-series for correspondence related to these matters.
Folder 31: London trade papers, 1785 Apr-JunAdd to your cart.
Papers regarding Deming's London trade and business dealings with Rogers & Bromfield, including bills of lading, insurance papers, statements of account, invoices, shipping documents, and the like. See the Correspondence sub-series for correspondence related to these matters.
Folder 32: London trade papers, 1785 Jul-DecAdd to your cart.
Papers regarding Deming's London trade and business dealings with Rogers & Bromfield, including bills of lading, insurance papers, statements of account, invoices, shipping documents, and the like. See the Correspondence sub-series for correspondence related to these matters.
Folder 33: London trade papers, 1786 Jan-AprAdd to your cart.
Papers regarding Deming's London trade and business dealings with Rogers & Bromfield, including bills of lading, insurance papers, statements of account, invoices, shipping documents, and the like. See the Correspondence sub-series for correspondence related to these matters.
Folder 34: London trade papers, 1786 May-NovAdd to your cart.
Papers regarding Deming's London trade and business dealings with Rogers & Bromfield, including bills of lading, insurance papers, statements of account, invoices, shipping documents, and the like. See the Correspondence sub-series for correspondence related to these matters.
Folder 35: London trade papers, 1787, undatedAdd to your cart.
Papers regarding Deming's London trade and business dealings with Rogers & Bromfield, including bills of lading, insurance papers, statements of account, invoices, shipping documents, and the like. See the Correspondence sub-series for correspondence related to these matters.
Folder 36: Middletown Bank settlements, 1821-1824Add to your cart.
Folder 37: Partnership agreements, 1790-1792Add to your cart.
Item 1: Julius Deming and Ozias Buell to establish the firm of Ozias Buell & Co., 1790 Aug 3Add to your cart.
Item 2: Henry Deming, Manna Wadsworth, and Julius Deming to establish the firm of Manna Wadsworth & Co., 1791 Apr 8Add to your cart.
Item 3: Benjamin Tallmadge and Julius Deming to establish the firm of Tallmadge & Deming, 1791 Apr 12Add to your cart.
Item 4: Huber Stone and Julius Deming to erect a paper mill, 1792 Apr 7Add to your cart.
Folder 38: Petition of Uriel Holmes and Frederick Wolcott against Julius Deming, 1824Add to your cart.
Folder 39: Promissory notes, 1788-1827Add to your cart.
Folder 40: Receipt for subscription for the relief of Rev. Mr. Beecher, 1816 Sep 4Add to your cart.
Folder 41: Tax lists, 1802-1813Add to your cart.
Folder 42: Tax lists, 1814-1824Add to your cart.
Folder 43: Tax lists, 1825-1836Add to your cart.
Folder 44: Town of Litchfield papers, 1796-1800Add to your cart.
Folder 45: Will and estate, 1835-1838Add to your cart.
Folder 46: Will and estate, 1838Add to your cart.
Folder 47: Will and estate, 1838Add to your cart.
Folder 48: Will and estate, 1838Add to your cart.
Folder 49: Will and estate, 1838, 1853, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 50: Wolcott, Oliver China trade papers, 1804-1810Add to your cart.
Papers regarding Deming's partnership with Oliver Wolcott and others to import goods from China, including partnership agreement, shipping documents, receipts for funds invested, profit and distribution statements, and the like.
Folder 51: Wolcott, Oliver China trade papers, 1812-1814Add to your cart.
Papers regarding Deming's partnership with Oliver Wolcott and others to import goods from China, including profit and distribution statements and the like.
Item 1: Daybook, 1806-1837Add to your cart.
Currently stored in 3B box 24.
Item 2: Ledger, 1784-1790Add to your cart.
Currently stored in 3B Box 24.
Sub-Series 3: Military papersAdd to your cart.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Colt, Peter to Deming, Julius, 1778 Jun 23Add to your cart.
Sends the bonds Deming mentioned; they will need to be altered to ten thousand from five thousand, an alteration easily made; Henry Laurence ought to be inserted instead of John Hancock, but that is not material; also sent new regulations to give Col. Champion's assistants; they ought not fall into other hands; he proposes going to Durham to meet Col. Champion.
Folder 2: Correspondence, Kellog, Edward from Deming, Julius, 1780 Feb 16Add to your cart.
Writes from Colchester that there will be not more than 250 or 300 head of cattle; expresses concern Kellog and Beckwith will have no cattle to provide forage for other than what they have on hand; discusses settlement of debts; lists the sources of cattle.
Folder 3: Correspondence, Roberts, Nathan to Deming, Julius, 1780 Jul 10Add to your cart.
Requests payment for the length of time he will serve as a soldier in Deming's stead.
Folder 4: Correspondence regarding Julius Deming's American Revolutionary War pension, 1834-1835Add to your cart.
14 letters. Correspondents are J. L. Edwards, Pension Office, War Dept.; Jabez W. Huntington; Julius Deming; James Dodd, Pension Office, Hartford; and Alexander Ray.
Folder 5: Discharge letter signed by Col. Timothy Skinner, 1788 Nov 3Add to your cart.
Folder 6: Financial papers, account book, 1776-1780Add to your cart.
Folder 7: Financial papers, account book, Mr. Gray's beef and mutton, 1776 SepAdd to your cart.
Folder 8: Financial papers, account book, Mr. Gray's beef and mutton, 1776 Sep-OctAdd to your cart.
Folder 9: Financial papers, account book, Mr. Brown's beef, 1776 OctAdd to your cart.
Folder 10: Financial papers, account book, Capt. Winship's and Mr. Gray's beef, 1776 Nov-DecAdd to your cart.
Folder 11: Financial papers, account book, commissary book A, 1776 Sep-OctAdd to your cart.
Folder 12: Financial papers, account book, commissary book B, 1776-1777Add to your cart.
Folder 13: Financial papers, receipt, John Trumbull to Julius Deming, 1777 Aug 10Add to your cart.
For $150, signed in Germantown.
Folder 14: Financial papers, receipt book, 1777Add to your cart.
Folder 15: Financial papers, daybook, commissary book A, 1778-1779Add to your cart.
Folder 16: Financial papers, daybook, commissary book B, 1779Add to your cart.
Folder 17: Financial papers, daybook, commissary book C, 1779-1780Add to your cart.
Folder 18: Financial papers, ledger 1, 1778-1779Add to your cart.
Folder 19: Financial papers, ledger 2, 1779-1780Add to your cart.
Folder 20: Order of Lt. Abner Wilson and Adj. Julius Deming, 1786 Oct 20Add to your cart.
Folder 21: Resolution of the Second Continental Congress, 1780 Jan 1Add to your cart.
Handwritten copy of a resolution regarding comissary generals and assistant comissory generals and goods that may be purchased by them.
Sub-Series 4: Other papersAdd to your cart.
Folder 1: List of articles furnished Clarissa Deming Perkins when she was married, 1817Add to your cart.
Folder 2: Obituary of Julius Deming by James Gould, 1838Add to your cart.
Folder 3: Prayers, 1813, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 4: Miscellaneous, 1784, 1833Add to your cart.
Item 1: Account of boarding in London, 1784Add to your cart.
Deming describes the dialogue of the waiter who served him, what he ordered, and what it cost.
Item 2: Drawing of a quail and her chicks, 1833 MarAdd to your cart.
Annotated with "Grand pa's drawing for Julius."
Sub-Series 22: Deming, Julius, Jr. (1782-1799)Add to your cart.
Julius Deming, Jr. (1782-1799) was a son of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1798Add to your cart.
Deming Jr. writes from Yale about needing money and settling his accounts; Vira has a child and is living at Mr. Hillhouse's; Isaac Baldwin will be publicly admonished; other details about his life in New Haven.
Item 1: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1798 Jun 12Add to your cart.
Item 2: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Dorothy Champion, [1798?] AugAdd to your cart.
Item 3: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Julius, 1798 Dec 1Add to your cart.
Item 4: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Julius, 1798 Dec 15Add to your cart.
Item 5: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Julius, 1798 Dec 27Add to your cart.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1799Add to your cart.
Deming Jr. writes from Yale about needing money and settling his accounts; Vira; news of family and friends; activities at Yale; his health.
Item 1: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Julius, 1799 Feb 16Add to your cart.
Item 2: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Dorothy, 1799 Mar 8Add to your cart.
Item 3: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Dorothy, 1779 Jun 11Add to your cart.
Reacts to his sister calling him a woman-hater and offers his opinion on the difference in the sexes.
Item 4: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Dorothy, 1799 Jun 15Add to your cart.
Item 5: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1799 Jun 25Add to your cart.
Item 6: Deming, Julius, Jr. to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1799 Jul 10Add to your cart.
Folder 3: Account book, 1798-1799Add to your cart.
Lists expenses while at Yale College.
Folder 4: Account statement, 1799 Sep 199Add to your cart.
Lists articles, mostly books and stationery items, purchased from Isaac Beers & Co.
Folder 5: Play manuscript and an essay, "A Geography of the Town of Litchfield", 1793, undatedAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 23: Deming, LucretiaAdd to your cart.
Lucretia Deming (1804-1887) was a daughter of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.
Sub-Series 1: CorrespondenceAdd to your cart.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1835-1836Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Dorothy to Deming, Mary, 1835 May 10Add to your cart.
Report on Dorothy's health and their limited activities in New York.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Julius, 1836 Oct 30Add to your cart.
Reports on their travels in and near St. Croix; Charles is very sick and she fears he will never see America again.
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia to Perkins, Mary Deming, 1836 Nov 1Add to your cart.
Describes her surroundings and activities in St. Croix.
Item 4: Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Charles to Deming, Mary, 1836 Nov 2Add to your cart.
Writing from St. Croix, Lucretia reports on sending letters by different ships; Charles reports on their safe arrival, comfortable lodgings, and good health at that place; expresses his gratitude toward Lucretia; hopes to return in a few months; his father's residence in Litchfield and his comforts around him are imcomparably preferable to that of the rich planter there.
Item 5: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Julius, 1836 Dec 1Add to your cart.
Reports on their travels in and around Kingston, Jamaica; Charles is very seasick; they are confident that a tropical climate will not answer for him and shall get away as soon as they can.
Item 6: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Julius, 1836 Dec 9Add to your cart.
Reports on her activities from Kingston, Jamaica; Charles' health; difficult to find anything worth having for you; news of acquaintences.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1837-1840Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming Mary, 1837 Jan 20Add to your cart.
Describes their journey from Havana to their location in the Gulf of Florida; news of acquaintances; additional note on top: at Charleston and all's well.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Julius, 1837 Jan 27Add to your cart.
Reports from Charleston on their voyage there; after the storm they endured, she does not want to go to sea again; Charles is better but feeble.
Item 3: Hickock, Laurens Perseus to Deming, Lucretia, 1838 Mar 2Add to your cart.
Writes from Western Reserve College regarding Julius Deming's death.
Item 4: Deming, Lucretia to Perkins, Mary Deming; Perkins, Lucretia; and Perkins, Julius Deming, 1838 Nov 2Add to your cart.
Writes regarding Mary's and her journey to Watertown; their accommodations there; expresses her concern for Maria; instructions for tasks they should perform.
Item 5: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Charles, [1840 Oct?]Add to your cart.
Forwards a Oct. 24, 1840, letter from Alexander Ray regarding an agency office opened in Washington for the purpose of prosecuting claims against the general government and before Congress; reports on family; Ozias Lewis' land; Benton and buying land.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1845Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Mary  to Deming, Julius, 1845 Jan 1Add to your cart.
written from Hartford, both Lucretia and Mary tell Julius of weather, neighbor, and family news. Mrs. Whitney  was going to travel to Maryland to get a grant from the government for the invention of the cotton gin.  Per Mrs. Whitney, Mr. Whitney never got the compensation he should have had. The trip down south may retard Julius' visit to the Whitneys. Mrs. Trumbull and Judge Storrs also called and the Judge asked about Julius. The letter was sent, in care of, Wm Russell M.D. in New Haven.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Mary to Deming, Julius, 1845 Aug 26Add to your cart.
Lucretia and Mary write to Julius from Litchfield Connecticut about the social happenings of the town, family, and neighbors.  The sisters want Julius to take care and not get sick and if he does, he needs to tell them.  Mr. Deming has budded 43 peach trees. The weather is gloomy and rainy.
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Mary to Deming, Julius, 1845 Sep 8Add to your cart.
Writing from Litchfield, the sisters feel Julius made a good choice in going back to grammar studies as it will help in in the future. They admonish him to watch his health.Mary wishes she had more to write and is thinking about a trip to New Haven staying in a quiet part of town. Social news is shared of family, friends, and neighbors. Letter is addressed in care of Wm Russell, M.D. in New Haven
Item 4: Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Mary to Deming, Julius, 1845 Nov 26Add to your cart.
written from Hartford, Mary is excited to see Julius at Christmas and mentions Governor Ellsworth. Lucretia shares news of the town, family and friends.
Item 5: Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Mary  to Deming, Julius, 1845 Dec 3Add to your cart.
written from Hartford, they instruct Julius to address his letters to Miss Lucretia Deming, Washington Street, Hartford Connecticut as there are other Demings in the city. A pew has not been arranged in church yet for the upcoming holiday and they suggest Julius speak to W Russell regarding a visit to see them. Lucretia notes the cousins all ask after him and like him very much.
Item 6: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Julius, 1845 Dec 11Add to your cart.
written from Hartford, Mary and Lucretia have not heard from Julius in a while and hope he has spoken to his instructor regarding a visit for Christmas. Mary has had a bad cold. Lucretia's eye is getting better and fears their last letter did not reach Julius.
Folder 4: Correspondence, 1846Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia and to Deming, Mary to  Deming, Julius, 1846 Feb 7Add to your cart.
written from Hartford, both Mary and Lucretia discuss how Julius' sister is in Washington, D.C. They ask how his teeth are as Mary had a tooth nerve destroyed and was painful. They also suggest Julius calls on Judge Storrs again during the winter and not to forget to do so. The greenhouses are looking beautiful  and will make a great bouquet.  Valentine's Day parties are being given in Litchfield by families  is shared along with other news of neighbors, family, and friends.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Mary to Deming, Julius, 1845 Mar 25Add to your cart.
written from Hartford, Mary discusses different types of pretty school dresses and tems purchased for Julius (bandana, kerchiefs, pantaloons, and vests.  The weather is good and there is a rhododendron blooming which is beautiful.  It is about time to call on Judge Storrs again and he will be at the Courthouse in Litchfield next month. Lucretia  mention Mr. Phelps purchased a  farm in Windsor for a deaf son and paid about $8000 for it.  She also mentions to Julius not to be afraid to call on Judge Storrs as the Judge will be gratified to be remembered.  She also comments that "People older than yourself are always glad & pleased to be noticed by the young."  Letter was sent in care of Wm Russell, M.D. in New Haven , Connecticut
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia and Deming, Mary to Deming Julius, 1846 Apr 1Add to your cart.
Letter is written in Hartford but Mary expects to leave for Litchfield tomorrow but the condition of the roads are questionable and potentially dangerous/unsafe for travel with a heavy carriage. They probably will leave next Monday instead. They will take a protestant Irish girl with them. She also wants to know if Julius called on Judge Storrs yet.  Lucretia tells Julius she cannot wait for everyone to be in Litchfield again. Mr. Phelps moved some items to the Windsor farm of his son by using a yolk of oxen. Talk of family, neighbors, and friends is also included. The letter is addressed in care of Wm. Russell, M.D. in New Haven, Connecticut
Folder 5: Correspondence, 1847Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Julius, 1847 Jan 29Add to your cart.
written from Litchfield, Lucretia is happy to hear Julius is happy through his sister.  Mary is in very bad health with weak eyes that are painful. She is confined . They do not see very many people and are lonely. Lucretia shares news of family, friends, and neighbors while warning Julius to be careful ice skating.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Julius, 1847 Feb 2Add to your cart.
written from Litchfield, Lucretia tells Julius about the oldest son of a neighbor/previous employee who drowned when he fell through thin ice while ice skating.  Lucretia does not want Julius to restrict his activities but to please be very careful since he is such a very good boy.
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Julius, 1847 Mar 10Add to your cart.
written from Litchfield, Lucretia relays his aunt's health prognosis which is not good. The doctor was there to see Mary who has been suffering from cough, nausea, vomiting, and takes nothing for nourishment but rice water and bread water. Julius' sister sat with Mary for a spell though it was a bad night. Letter is addressed in care of Wm. Russell, in New Haven, Connecticut
Sub-Folder 1: Knox, Maria to Deming, Lucretia, 1857 Apr 29Add to your cart.
sent from Hartford to Lucretia in Litchfield, Maria Knox expresses her disbelief and sadness at Mary's passing as well as her feelings of sadness and regret. She did not belief Mary's passing was real until she read it in the newspaper. Maria did not know she was sick and would have come and sat with Mary.
Folder 6: Correspondence, 1850Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Perkins, Lucretia Deming, 1850 Nov 4Add to your cart.
sent from New York to Lucretia Deming Perkins in Litchfield was a letter about social news of family and friends. An elegant concert by Jenny Lind was mentioned and all those who attended were delighted. Julius’ well being and activities are mentioned as well. The letter was started on Monday November 4th and continues to Wednesday November 6th, 1850.
Folder 7: Correspondence, 1852Add to your cart.
Item 1: Trumbull, Governor Joseph to Deming, Lucretia, 1852 Jul 29Add to your cart.
Governor Trumbull writes to his cousin Lucretia from Hartford, dated 1852 Jul 29, and is sent to Lucretia in Litchfield. A bill is enclosed and she should ask Judge Storrs or any other gentleman for their opinion on the matter which is not discussed.
Folder 8: Correspondence, 1852Add to your cart.
Item 1: McVickers, M.D., J.A. to Deming, Lucretia, 1852 Jun 25Add to your cart.
Dr. McVickers writes to Lucretia in New York, hanking her for the beautiful tea service. McVickers mentions that during his time as a physician, Lucretia’s brother Charles (1789-1852) was markedly kind, gracious, and considerate.
Folder 9: Correspondence, 1852Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1852 Oct 14Add to your cart.
written from New York, Lucretia describes furnishing arrangements which are not yet complete but they far enough along so she is able to make Mary comfortable during her visit.  Lucretia also discusses social news of family and friends as well as her health.
Folder 10: Correspondence, 1859Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to friends, 1859 Jun 17Add to your cart.
Written in Litchfield to friends, Lucretia discusses social and family news. Also included are two newspaper clippings relating to Mr. W.H.L. Barnes who hit his head on a ship's gangway and has not recovered and is feared to be suffering from permanent brain injury. The second clipping addresses Mr. Charles Freeman returning to Litchfield from Liberia as he prefers to live and die in his native town.
Folder 11: Correspondence, 1867Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1867 Mar 27Add to your cart.
Lucretia writes to Mary from New York that Mrs. Mullins is opening her millinery shop tomorrow but concludes Mary doesn’t want to attend any more than she does so her invitation has not been forwarded.
Item 2: Deming Lucretia, to Deming, Mary, 1867 Apr 7Add to your cart.
written in New York, Lucretia notes the difficulty in finding a summer home in Litchfield to rent for the season. She also tells Mary the news of family and friends.
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1867 May 31Add to your cart.
From Litchfield, Lucretia tells Mary that Mr. Hoppin’s new book was published speedily and he should be gratified with the results of his labor but she doubts it will be considered a very pleasing book.  There has been a lot of rain with flooding and draining issues discussed. Family and social news is shared.
Folder 12: Correspondence, 1875Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1875 Jun 21Add to your cart.
Lucretia writes to Mary from Litchfield on Monday June 21st trying to figure out if the story of a “Miss Champion” who supposedly carried funds for the Army through enemy lines and was escorted by a slave during the Revolutionary War. Lucretia mentions her father’s involvement during the War, lineage, and family stories.  She also recounts family heirlooms still in her possession and the sentimental values attached to them.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1875 Jun 22Add to your cart.
Lucretia does not believe the story of the Champion girl going behind British lines and she checked with Mrs. Bacon. Lucretia also comments that family traditions have become distorted. Her father’s pension (#450) was discussed and the typographical error which mis-ranked him caused an issue with monetary compensation. Comments on the weather and social gossip were included.
Folder 13: Correspondence, 1876 Feb to MayAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Feb 3Add to your cart.
Social and family news and musings are discussed along with a mention of Jacob Morse who can have land at Griswold Street per the terms he has offered. Letter written from New York.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Feb 18Add to your cart.
Lucretia writes to Mary regarding social news and daily activities of the household. Letter written from New York.
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Apr 5Add to your cart.
Lucretia discusses about the health and well being of family members, social news, as well as observations on the economy. Letter written from New York.
Item 4: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Apr 23Add to your cart.
Lucretia discusses the social happenings of family and friends as well as household news. She mentions Edith is learning to read a little and she is getting experience in keeping a ‘dame’ school.  Letter written from New York.
Item 5: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Apr 28Add to your cart.
Lucretia discusses building materials and such for her Litchfield house along with a property sale by Deming which he shares in his own writing. Letter written from New York.
Item 6: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 May 5Add to your cart.
Lucretia updates Mary on the progress of the house with questions to Mary regarding borders and wainscoting plus furniture decisions. Social news is shared of family and friends. Letter written from New York.
Item 7: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 May 17Add to your cart.
Lucretia discuss social happenings, the status of the house renovations, and other family updates. Letter written from New York.
Item 8: Deming, Lucretia toAdd to your cart.
Folder 14: Correspondence, 1876 Jun to JulAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Jun 4Add to your cart.
Lucretia is settled in her Litchfield home and includes social news of family and friends. She will be happy to see Mary at her house with her family. Letter written from Litchfield.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Jun 11Add to your cart.
Social news of family and friends including Deming and his wife who have been attentive is mentioned. Preparations in Mary's house have proceeded vigorously for some days. Other social news and daily activities of the household are mentioned. Letter written from Litchfield.
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Jun 12Add to your cart.
A letter regarding issues with Lucretia's plumbing as well as social news of the neighborhood, family and friends is sent from Litchfield. Lucretia is eagerly awaiting her arrival and will rejoice when she finally arrives.
Item 4: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Jun 18Add to your cart.
Lucretia is happy that Mary is settled in her new (old) house. Lucretia had her new green window shades hung and mentions an inventory was taken by Deming and his wife who are useful. A strawberry festival for the Village Improvement Society will be held on Wednesday evening - a slow way of raising money. Lucretia wishes there was more wealth in Litchfield so more could be done. The letter was written in Litchfield.
Item 5: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Jun 24Add to your cart.
Lucretia tells Mary the jellies are still on a table and have not been brough to the attic store room as she is afraid of black ants. The chambers are in order with blankets and spreads laid on each bed. Other household chores are mentioned in detail as well as items. News of family, friends, and neighbors is shared as well as holiday plans. The festival for the Village Improvement Society (V.I.S.) went well and netted a little over $100.  Lucretia comments its a slow, hard way of raising money for public objects. Letter was written in Litchfield.
Item 6: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Jun 27Add to your cart.
Lucretia lets Mary know that today will complete all preparations for her tenants in the house with everything being in fine order.  Many tidbits about the state of the house preparation and furnishings are discussed.  Deming received a telegram regarding some visitors will be arriving this Tuesday evening and they do not know who will be accompanying the sender. News of family, neighbors, and friends is shared. Letter was sent from Litchfield.
Item 7: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Jul 8Add to your cart.
Lucretia is happy to hear through Deming that Mary is progresing and getting her residence arranged. Deming also shares that the house looks beautifully pleasant and hopes she will enjoy living there.  Places to board in town are discussed as well as who has vacancy and which students are boarding where. Household bills are discussed. The town's Centennial celebration is mentioned; the houses were handsomely decorated with flags, lanterns with the illuminations being successful and beautiful. A very respectable collection of antiquities was exhibited as well. The letter was written in Litchfield and also includes social news of family and friends.
Item 8: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Jul 15Add to your cart.
Lucretia shares news of family and friends as well as weather musings (the heat has been intense but today is a little cooler). Deming was headed to New York City but plans on returning the same day. Love and best wishes are given to Mary and her family. Letter was written in Litchfield.
Item 9: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Jul 21Add to your cart.
Lucretia is looking forward to seeing Ben here on Monday evening for as long of a time as he can find it convenient to visit. News of family and friends is shared. The village is very full now and Lucretia thinks such weather would drive all out of New York that could go. Written from Litchfield.
Item 10: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Jul 29Add to your cart.
Lucretia is apologetic regarding Mary’s sick girl and hopes she can resume her duties. She is glad to hear Ben had a nice time visiting and looks forward to this return. The weather is warmer today and beautiful. Deming is being driven out this way by Mason on business connected with the coming Fair. News of family, friends, and neighbors is shared. An agent for a Geneva nursery has just called with Lucretia placing a small order: 3 hickory trees and 2 white oaks.  She comments how difficult it is to remove the trees as their root systems have long spindle shaped roots perhaps for this reason. She comments maybe Deming grandchildren will pick up hickory nuts. She also has butternut and a young chestnut tree growing plus gives an observation on pine trees. Letter was written in Litchfield.
Folder 15: Correspondence, 1876 Oct to DecAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Sep 5Add to your cart.
Lucretia shares news of family, friends, and neighbors. She comments how lonely it is after her family has left and how long the day is. Health conditions of other neighbors are mentioned like Mrs. Phelps who may be losing her mind. The health of her trees is shared as well. A trip to Jacob Moss' beautiful apple orchard was taken to get samples of pie apples. The letter is written from Litchfield and continues to Thursday September 6th.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876Add to your cart.
Lucretia shares the health news of Mrs. Phelps who can sit in her chair, smile, and shake hands but cannot speak. She doesn not think it was some kind of fit as Mrs. Phelps lay  in a profound slumber for two hours and could not be awakend; her breathing was perfectly natural and circulation was good...maybe it was paralysis of organs? Lucretia went to a prayer meeting last evening and also to the previous month's concert.  Autumnal house cleaning is taking place and the carpets on the second story need to be taken up. Other news of family and friends is shared. The letter is written from Litchfield.
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Oct 1Add to your cart.
Lucretia has arrived home to Litchfield from a trip to Philadelphia (had good accomodations there) but caught a cold. Deming’s wife Margaretta is mentioned and Lucretia believes her to be a delicate woman who suffers from neuralgia in the head. Mr. McLane preached a sermon. Social happenings and news of neighbors, family, and friends was shared. Letter was written in Litchfield.
Item 4: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Oct 7Add to your cart.
Lucretia shares Deming and family are heading to New York and Philadelphia to shop and to conduct business. Deming’s wife Margaretta still has neuralgia. Lucretia plans on remaining in Litchfield until the end of November. Social news and personal observations are shared. Letter written in Litchfield.
Item 5: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Oct 8Add to your cart.
Lucretia mentions being in receipt of Mary’s latest letter. Writing has become a great labor and does not understand how Mary can do it. She shares news of family and friends with Mary along with personal observations and weather musings. They are preparing to leave for New York. Letter was written in Litchfield.
Item 6: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Nov 2Add to your cart.
Lucretia lets Mary know it is a pleasant day and she is all ready to go to New York. A table of Mary’s was repaired. Social news is shared about family, friends, and neighbors. Letter was written in Litchfield.
Item 7: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1876 Dec 14Add to your cart.
Lucretia has moved from her home in Litchfield back to New York for the winter. Social work and charity is discussed along with shopping for the holiday season (the store window displays are very handsome). Lucretia had a nice time visiting with Mary and wishes they could meet more frequently.  Lucretia has a dental appointment this afternoon and does not anticipate any problems. News is shared about family, friends, and neighbors. Letter written in New York.
Folder 16: Correspondence, 1877Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1877 May 4Add to your cart.
Lucretia shares news of family and friends, the condition of their health, as well as the news of Litchfield with Mary and Ben. The weather has been pleasant since they left on their trip with hopefully no seasickness.  Lucretia plans on returning to Litchfield on May 25th but it is a little doubtful she can leave so soon. Mrs. Tallmadge has had an operation on one of her eyes which they think will prove very successful.  The letter is written from New York.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1877 May 22Add to your cart.
Lucretia is preparing to leave New York for Litchfield since the extreme heat of the weather has caused their cares to be more burdensome.  She hired different staff to take care of the house this summer as the folks who took care of the house last year were fine for a while until it became very dirty. Morris residents are beginning to look up and find means of improving their conditions by renting houses. News of family, friends, and neighbors is also shared. The letter is written from New York.
Folder 17: Correspondence, 1878Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1878 Jan 13Add to your cart.
Lucretia had a nice time at church with Deming, Margarette, and Edith. Dr. Booth preached to a large audience. An update on the author's health is given and social news of family, friends, neighbors, and staff. Mourning etiquette is discussed as well as Edith’s performance in school. The letter is written from New York.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1878 Sep 24Add to your cart.
The letter is written from Litchfield and discusses Lucretia's medical issues (headaches, weak eyes) and Mary’s toothache as well as social news of friends, who her callers were, family, and neighbors.
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1878 Oct 2Add to your cart.
The letter is written from Litchfield and discusses both women’s medical conditions, the weather, as well as social news of friends, who Lucretia’s callers were, family, and neighbors. Dr. Duffy’s daughter caught malaria in New Jersey and brought it back to New York. Her death caused much grief for the family.
Folder 18: Correspondence, 1879Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1879 Jan 30Add to your cart.
Lucretia is aware she has not responded to Mary’s letter in a while with her excuse being there are very few days when she is free from headaches.  The weather has been cold and keeps her at home most of the time and not a lot of social calls have been made. Deming and Margarette’s Edith had to go to the dentist and in the chair for two hours, maybe more but does not need to return for additional work.  Lucretia has not had a lot of updates from Litchfield.  The letter was written in New York.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1879 Feb 28Add to your cart.
Lucretia discusses the preparation and worries about her Litchfield house. She mentions health updates such as a persistent cough intermingled with her usual headaches. Julius Deming Perkins’ wife Margarette has been very sick with a greatly swollen throat and little sleep. Dr. Allen saw her yesterday evening and he hopes she will improve. Lucretia heard from her friend Marie Knox who shares details about her husband’s ill health and details about the small barn that they built last spring.  The Knox’s had to sell their bees to pay for the building materials for the barn. The weather is very cold and the streets look icy- it has been a hard winter. Social news is also shared and the letter was written in New York.
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1879 Mar 17Add to your cart.
Lucretia is looking forward to the spring as the winter weather has been unpleasant. Today is St. Patrick’s day and it is raining yet again.  Social news, updates on friends and family are discussed. Letter was written in New York.
Item 4: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1879 Apr 3Add to your cart.
Lucretia tells Mary that Mr. Hoppin has left this morning for New Haven on the 8 o’clock train. Some of Mary’s articles are in the cottage and are worth keeping. All is well here. Lucretia also discusses social news and family happenings. Letter was written in New York.
Item 5: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1879 Apr 28Add to your cart.
Lucretia is sorry that Mary is having so much trouble with the “Will Case” with no way but to hear it and contest to the best of her ability. Lucretia does not understand the proceedings or why it is necessary to have so many hearings.  The City has been unhealthy this winter and the author caught another cold just as she was recovering from a previous cold. She hopes she can get out tomorrow as she needs a summer bonnet and caps.
Item 6: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1879 May 4Add to your cart.
Lucretia notes that Mary has been in Providence and Jules has informed her that the “Case” was to come the past Friday.  She said Jules made a good case and it appears to have gone well.  On the domestic front, the carpet shaker will be coming tomorrow. Lucretia had a pleasant call from Judge Curtis last evening, a neighbor. Weather musings and other social news was shared. Letter was written from New York.
Item 7: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1879 May 28Add to your cart.
Lucretia notes writing is laborious, painful and she does little of it. Weather has been cold for the season plus news of friends, family, and neighbors is shared. Concern for health is also mentioned as well as Litchfield news.  Letter was written in Litchfield.
Item 8: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1879 Jun 25Add to your cart.
Lucretia is glad to hear Mary is spending time with Mason and Mr. Hoppin finished his memoir. The Trowbridge family has arrived in Litchfield. Lucretia is also sorry for Mary’s trouble in the “Will” case and surmises it may come to a sudden collapse when the contestants find her firm. Men are working in the fields and tending to the property. The village is looking well, particularly the lawns which are well kept.  Social news of family, friends, and neighbors is shared. Letter was written in Litchfield.
Item 9: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1879 Jul 13Add to your cart.
Lucretia shares news of family, friends, neighbors, and of her church. She is also happy to see Mason who has grown since the last time she saw him. Lucretia has been trimming trees with Deming devoting the day to the activity. Work was also done in the cemetery with two men for a half a day trimming two tamarack trees planted by E.C. Bacon
Item 10: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1879 Jul 28Add to your cart.
Lucretia notes Deming had business in New York and made it back to Litchfield in one day and shared a cab with Mason who was crossing the City. News of family, friends, and neighbors was shared. Mrs. Bacon is not prudent with her health and took cold the other day. Many strangers are in town, Mr. Starr supplied the pulpit last Sunday, and the Archery Club is still in existence. The letter was written from Litchfield.
Folder 19: Correspondence, 1882-1885Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1882 Jan 22Add to your cart.
Lucretia tells Mary they arrived back safely and had a drawing room car which provided comfort. Mrs. Bacon passed away; she was a good friend and Lucretia was sad to hear of the news. News of other family members and friends is shared; an invitation is extended to Mary and her family to visit anytime. Letter was written in New York.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1882 Apr 11Add to your cart.
Lucretia discusses news of family and friends, plus weather musings (it is cold for April with a light snow that has melted already but air is chilly). Edith’s lessons are going well with devilishry (sic) intermingled. She had to do some errands. Lucretia speaks of Litchfield but have no plans as to the time of return. Lucretia mentions the horse can be taken back to Litchfield by car with less fuss required than for Jumbo (the elephant from the London zoo as noted by another family member at a later date). Letter was written in New York.
Item 3: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1882 Jun 16Add to your cart.
The wedding of George Richards was mentioned by Lucretia. The event designed to be a quiet affair and Mrs. Richards looked the best of anyone there. Miss Jane McLaughlin’s funeral was prepared with care but Lucretia did not attend. Mr. Geo. Woodruff is so generous by furnishing the two libraries in Litchfield which are being stocked with books; some more painting needs to be done. News of family, friends, and other neighbors is mentioned. The horse chestnuts are in bloom. Letter was written in Litchfield.
Item 4: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1882 Nov 10Add to your cart.
Lucretia comments on Mary’s departure via stage and how much they will miss her. Health concerns are also shared such as Lucretia’s back problems/pain as well as news of neighbors, family, and friends. Weather is delightfully mild. Letter was written in Litchfield.
Item 5: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1882 Nov 18Add to your cart.
Comfortable accommodations were provided for Lucretia’s trip back to New York. Her back is improving but still weak. New York house repairs are being performed with plumbers, painters, and repairmen working. Taxes have been paid. Hired help is discussed, Lizzie Fagan, now Mrs. Martin will be Lucretia’s laundress and part time chambermaid. Mr. Martin will take is meals elsewhere. Weather is mild. Other musings of neighbors and friends was shared. Letter was written in New York.
Item 6: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1882 Nov 24Add to your cart.
Winter preparations on the house are almost complete. Lucretia’s horses are getting accustomed to City noises and confusion very well as she drives to the park every day. The doctor has seen her and has helped with her pain. A new outside garment was ordered; silk on the outside that is wadded with wool and trimmed with plush. The dressmaker will come by next week to measure her and it must be very large.  Letter was written in New York.
Item 7: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1882 Dec 6Add to your cart.
Lucretia mentions she has very little to write about as she is in good health plus family and friends matters progress very smoothly.  Her horses have been sick with a cold (the off horse a little less sick than the other) with a possible epidemic going around the stable where she keeps them. She updates Mary on the progress of her new coat mentioned in the November 24th letter. Deming and family has been sleigh riding. Updates about family, friends, and neighbors. Letter was written in New York.
Item 8: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1883 Feb 22Add to your cart.
Lucretia starts the letter by acknowledging it is a legal holiday with more leisure time than normal. She mentions updates on Edith and her drawing/artistic headaches. She wants to attend the Art School but went to the Academy of Design. Also mentioned are geography and French lessons. Deming’s Margaretta is ill. Updates are provided on family, friends, and neighbors. Letter was written in New York.
Item 9: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Dr. and Mrs., 1883 Sep 19Add to your cart.
Lucretia writes to Dr. and Mrs. William Deming on 1883 Feb 19 letting them know she very much regrets that she must decline the invitation for this evening.  Her infirmity of deafness is so great as to deprive her of all the enjoyment of the musicale.  The decline was written on monogrammed stationary with an accompanying envelope. Addressed to the Demings on North St.
Item 10: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1883 Nov 20Add to your cart.
Written from New York, Lucretia tells Mary that she hopes there will be no more blizzards this year.  She includes a newspaper clipping which discusses the seven day gale on the Great Lakes which has taken an unprecedented toll on property and lives. Lucretia’s horse has a sore neck again with the collar not quite fitting it. She took Mary Quincy with her who has a little sore throat. Deming has found and engaged a Protestant waitress who has good recommendations and will also take care of the furnace as well.
Item 11: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1883 Nov 20Add to your cart.
An upholsterer has been here and hung all of Lucretia’s remaining curtains. A furnace repairman will arrive tomorrow and repair and take a look at the kitchen stove. Deming was nice enough to meet the harnessman at the stable who thinks he will be able to adjust Thistle’s colar (sic) to fit but in the mean time, the horse will lie for a few days to recover from the irritation caused by the colar (sic). Lucretia’s eyes are week and may not be able to write tomorrow so there is no need for Mary to feel like she should do so much writing. The letter was written in New York.
Item 12: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1883 Nov 21 to 1883 Nov 22Add to your cart.
A short note discussing Deming’s assessment of Lueres. Continued on 1883 Nov 22, Deming finds Lueres up and dressed but feeling very weak and sick.  Lucretia discusses the merits of Dr. Carlton and Dr. Allen to treat Lueres. Lucretia is getting over a neuralgic headache and cannot give a very good letter.  The weather has been faithfully warm and news of other family, friends, and neighbors is discussed. The letter was written in New York.
Item 13: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1883 Nov 25Add to your cart.
Lucretia just returned from visiting Lueres who met her dressed and looking brighter than expected. She was glad to see Lucretia but admitted being weak still and getting sleep in short naps.  Lucertia’s house is nearly in order and is waiting to get the roof painted before putting down the stair carpets. News of family, friends, and neighbors is shared plus weather musings (it is cooler today and a welcome change). The letter was written in New York.
Item 14: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, 1885 Jul 26Add to your cart.
Lucretia is glad to hear that Mary has had a pleasant encounter with Ben and that she is not suffering from the weather. Deming is a good correspondent and keeps Mary informed of the news. Deming thinks that bars in public houses are not allowed to sell liquor on Sundays and are strictly watched. Everyone misses Mary very much and will rejoice when they see her again. News of family, friends, and neighbors is shared. Letter was written in Litchfield.
Folder 20: Correspondence, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Lucretia to Deming, Mary, Apr 16Add to your cart.
Lucretia thinks it is the dullest day she has had all winter as she is still shut up indoors with her cough and weak eyes. Mother’s marriage was 50 years ago on April 17th. Ben is taking back two shirts left by Mr. Hoppin; one in the closest and the other was under a pillow. Mrs. Theo. Baldwin and children sailed on the Great Eastern today with only 191 passengers.  The theatricals of Jeromes Theater have raised $12.000 for the Southern Relief Fund with Wm. Traceys youngest daughter being one of the performers.  Letter was written in New York.
Item 2: Deming, Lucretia to Swan, OctAdd to your cart.
Lucretia asks Swan to excuse the liberty she has taken when she inquired whether or not he keeps chickens as she is afraid his chickens will injure the plants in her garden. Since her chickens are restricted she is obliged that Swan will do the same with his.
Sub-Series 2: Financial and legal papersAdd to your cart.
Folder 1: Account, 1837Add to your cart.
Folder 2: Bills and receipts, 1834-1840Add to your cart.
Folder 3: Bills and receipts, 1841-1845Add to your cart.
Sub-Folder 1: 1841Add to your cart.
Food for both humans and animals, and proof of payment for church pew in Litchfield
Sub-Folder 2: 1842Add to your cart.
Taxes. food for animals and humans. itemized list of clothing.fee for borrowing horses.
Sub-Folder 3: 1843-1845Add to your cart.
house repairs. payment of Litchfield church pew. delivery of coal.self portrait of Lucretia Deming by William Bissell.
Folder 4: Bills and receipts, 1845-1849Add to your cart.
Sub-Folder 1: 1846-1847Add to your cart.
Plants. postage. silver coffin plate. silver forks and pin. food for humans and animals. livestock. probate fees for Mary Deming. Hartford house rental. Hartford groceries.
Sub-Folder 2: 1848Add to your cart.
Household items, furniture, bonnet, New York Albion newpaper subscription, groceries.
Sub-Folder 3: 1849Add to your cart.
Fencing material, postage, fabric, dressmaking supplies, oil, hat, pine trees, newspaper, Litchfield church pew, and martin fur muff.
Folder 5: Bills and receipts, 1850-1859Add to your cart.
Sub-Folder 1: 1850-1852Add to your cart.
Jewelry and silver from Ball, Black & Co.  clothing. Litchfield taxes. lodging at Hartford City Hotel. household chores/hired man. horseshoeing.
Sub-Folder 2: 1853-1854Add to your cart.
lodging at Bagg's Hotel in Utica NY; Congress Hall in Albany, NY; Revere House, Boston MA. Wages for hired help in Litchfield. food for animals and humans. turpentine, trees. fees to William Bissell (portrait painter). furniture. fees to Edgar Van Winkle for assistance with Charles Deming estate, New York. postage.
Sub-Folder 3: 1855-1859Add to your cart.
lodging at Revere House, Boston MA.; City Hotel, Hartford, CT. food for people. dry goods shares of stock in the Wolcott Institute. drawing of Lucretia Deming's will by Edgar Van Winkle, NY. Tiffany & Co, NY. insurance policy for Litchfield house. alcohol & rum. engraving portrait. stationary. purchase of a red cow. furniture.
Folder 6: Bills and receipts, 1860-1869Add to your cart.
Litchfield church pew rental. workers wages. building supplies. horse harness. lodging at New Haven Hotel, CT. Litchfield postage. boarding for horses in New York.
Folder 7: Bills and receipts, 1878-1879Add to your cart.
Sub-Folder 1: 1878Add to your cart.
Charitable donation to the Samaritan Home for the Aged, Colored Orphan Asylum. Litchfield taxes. Litchfield church pew rental (1st Eccl. Society), Presbyterian Church on University Place New York church pew rental. newspaper subscription to the Journal of Commerce. railroad shipping fees. Meriden Britanna Company.
Sub-Folder 2: 1879Add to your cart.
post office box rental in Litchfield. Litchfield taxes. newspaper subscriptions to The New York Observer, The Journal of Commerce, The Evening Post.  carriage maintenence. railroad shipping fees from Litchfield to New York. church pew rentals at the Presbyterian Church on University Place and to the 1st Eccl. Society of Litchfield. charitable donations to the Association for the Benefit of Colored Orphans, The Samaritan Home for the Aged. American Dist. Telegraph Co. clothing. food for humans.
Folder 8: Bills and receipts, 1880-1885Add to your cart.
Sub-Folder 1: 1880Add to your cart.
Litchfield post office box rental. Litchfield taxes. newspaper subscriptions to the New York Observer, The Evening Post.  charitable donation to the Five Points House of Industry (for homeless children), Children's Aid Society, The American Seamen's Friend Society. pew rental fees at The Presbyterian Church on University Place and to the 1st Eccl. Society of Litchfield. food for animals and humans. work on carriage.  railroad shipping fees.
Sub-Folder 2: 1881Add to your cart.
Litchfield post office box rental. druggist. newspapers subscription to The New York Observer, The New York Times.  Litchfield taxes. railroad shipping fees. church pew fees for The Presbyterian Church of University Place and to the 1st Eccl. Society of Litchfield. food for human. Charitable donation to the Samaritan Home for The Aged.
Sub-Folder 3: 1882Add to your cart.
newspaper subscription to The New York Observer, Litchfield Enquirer. doctor bill from Litchfield,  (H.E. Gates). butter. post office box rental, Litchfield. Charitable donation to the Assocation for the Benefit of Colored Orphans. Veterinary bill for the medical treatment of horses from New York.
Sub-Folder 4: 1883Add to your cart.
Post office box rental, Litchfield. railroad shipping fees, Litchfield to New York. Litchfield taxes.  Church pew rental at The Presbyterian Church on University Place and to the 1st Ecc. Society of Litchfield. newspaper subscription to The New York Times. property repair. animal feed. wages for hired help. delivery fees. Edwin S. Vail, M.D. medical fees for Lucretia Deming. safe deposit box rental. Charitable donation to The Samaritan Home for the Aged and Association for the Benefit of Colored Orphans.
Sub-Folder 5: 1884Add to your cart.
Post office box rental, Litchfield. newspaper subscriptions to The New York Observer, The New York Times. Litchfield taxes. church pew rental fees to The Presbyterian Church on University Place and to the 1st Eccl. Society of Litchfield. hired help to clean monument and stones in the Litchfield Cemetary.  Renewal of safe deposit box in New York. Charitable donations to The Samaraitan Home for the Aged, Foreign Missionary Society, Colored Orphan Asylum. Druggist in Litchfield. stone. Edwin S. Vail M.D. bill for Lucretia Deming. purchase of ice. railroad shipping fees from Litchfield to New York.
Sub-Folder 6: 1885Add to your cart.
post office box rental in Litchfield. Newspaper subscription to The New York Observer, New York Times. Church pew rental at The Presbyterian Church on University Place and to the 1st Eccl. Society of Litchfield. butter. medical bill for Lucretia Deming from H.E. Palmer. strawberries and raspberries.  horse harness.  Charitable donations to the Samaritan Home for the Aged, Colored Orphan Asylum.  seamstress (gowns and buttonholes). building supplies. railroad shipping fees from Litchfield to New York. Inventory of Lucretia Deming's wearing apparel.
Folder 9: Real Estate records: 305 5th Ave. New York, NYAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Deed, 1859 Mar 12Add to your cart.
Deed for the previous owners of 305 5th Avenue, James & Sarah Flanagan to new owner Richard Morse.
Item 2: Insurance and property information, 1862 NovAdd to your cart.
Lucretia's notes regarding insurance for property and household items as well as expenses
Item 3: Abstract of Title, 1862 NovAdd to your cart.
Includes property description and the previous owners dating back to 1799 when the property was formerly part of the Common Lands belonging to the City of New York under several different grants and charters.
Item 4: Property Deed, 1862 Nov 8Add to your cart.
Deed from Robert Morse and wife to Lucretia Deming
Item 5: Offer letter for sale of property, 1863 Jul 8Add to your cart.
Homer Morgan sends Lucretia Deming's lawyer, Julius Deming Perkins, an offer letter of $37,500 for the property on 305 5th Avenue.
Item 6: Contract of Sale, 1863 Sep 16Add to your cart.
A contract of sale to sell 305 5th Avenue and a lot on 32nd Street to Mr. Robert Colgate
Item 7: A letter of request, 1863 Oct 15Add to your cart.
A letter is sent requesting the key to 305 5th Avenue be delivered which Julius Deming Perkins notes has been taken care of on 1863 Oct 15.
Item 8: Search for unpaid taxes, 1864 AprAdd to your cart.
Record of completed tax search including taxes for Croton Water on 305 5th Ave.
Item 9: Receipt for legal fees, 1864 NovAdd to your cart.
A receipt to Lucretia Deming from her lawyer Edgar Van Winkle regarding drawing up and filing papers for tax search for 5th Ave property as well as 32nd Street.
Item 10: Search for unpaid taxes, 1864 Nov 5Add to your cart.
a request and completed unpaid tax search which includes Croton Water taxes.
Folder 10: Real Estate records: 32nd St. New York, NYAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Personal Cash Balance/Expense Book, 1863 JanAdd to your cart.
Lucretia's personal account of cash balances and of expenses for the 32nd Street property
Item 2: Property Deed, 1863 Jan 28Add to your cart.
Deed for the property at 32nd Street being sold from Charles Haven to Lucretia Deming
Item 3: Agreement, 1863 Jan 28Add to your cart.
Additional terms and agreement between Charles Haven and Lucretia Deming regarding the sale of the 32nd St. property
Item 4: Copy of Abstract of Title, 1863 Jan 28Add to your cart.
A copy of the abstract of title drawn up by Edgar Van Winkle for Lucretia Deming regarding the 32nd Street property
Item 5: Search for unpaid taxes, 1864 Apr 30Add to your cart.
A completed search for unpaid taxes including the Croton Water tax
Item 6: Search for unpaid taxes, 1864 Nov 2Add to your cart.
A completed search for unpaid taxes including the Croton Water tax.
Folder 11: Real Estate records: 34 Bond St. New York, NYAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Property Deed, 1851 May 9Add to your cart.
Deed for the property on 34 Bond Street, New York being sold by Henry S. Severich and Margaret D., his wife, to Charles Deming
Item 2: Abstract of Title, 1851 Jun 10Add to your cart.
Abstract of title for 34 Bond Street with history of previous owners dating back to 1772
Item 3: Contract of Sale, 1863 Jan 20Add to your cart.
Contract of sale between Lucretia Deming and J.A. Leutz which notes payment terms
Item 4: Search for unpaid taxes, 1863 Nov 3Add to your cart.
A completed search for unpaid taxes including the Croton Water tax.
Folder 12: Real Estate records: 9 W. 20th St. New York, NYAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Consolidated Gas Company of New York Bills, 1885Add to your cart.
4 bills from 1885 which were payable at the branch office, 4 Irving Place. The bills show how much gas was used and the price which was $1.75 per 1,000 cubic feet.
Item 2: Department of Public Works Water Permits, 1878-1881Add to your cart.
5 street washer permits which allow for Croton water to be used with a hose to clean in front of 9 West 20th St.
Item 3: Department of Pubic Works, Bureau of Water Register Taxes, 1878-1885Add to your cart.
Taxes for Croton water usage at 9 W. 20th Street.
Item 4: American District Telegraph Company, 1879-1885Add to your cart.
Rental bills/receipts of instrument from December 1 to December 31, 1879. January 1 to January 31, February 1 to February 29, March 31, May 31, 1880 and January 1885 for property at 9 West 20th St.
Item 5: Deed, 1850 Dec 13Add to your cart.
Deed for 2 lots: Northerly side of 20th Street between 5th and 6th Aves.; lots 24 and 25. Sale to William Brady from Catelina Oothout.
Item 6: Memorandum of Agreement, 1850 Dec 23Add to your cart.
Memorandum of Agreement between Richard D. VanWagenen and William Brady regarding a wall being built between 7 and 9 W. 20th St. New York.
Item 7: Abstract of Title, 1863 Sep 17Add to your cart.
Two copies of the Abstract of Title for 9 West 20th Street which has previous owners information dating back to 1795
Item 8: Contract of Sale, 1863 Sep 12Add to your cart.
Contract of sale for 9 W. 20th St. New York  from William Brady to Julius Deming Perkins and Lucretia Deming.
Item 9: Bill of Sale, 1863 Sep 17Add to your cart.
Bill of sale for 9 West 20th Street from William V. Brady to Lucretia Deming
Item 10: Search for unpaid taxes, 1876 NovAdd to your cart.
A completed search for unpaid taxes including the Croton Water tax.
Item 11: Search for unpaid taxes, 1885 MayAdd to your cart.
A completed search for unpaid taxes including the Croton Water tax for 9 West 20th St.
Item 12: Agreement, 1888 Dec 21Add to your cart.
A legal agreement between Julius Deming Perkins and Janet L. Lansing regarding a wall between #7 and #9 W. 20th St. New York
Item 13: Rental Agreement, 1890 Feb 14Add to your cart.
a rental agreement for 9 W. 20th property between Julius Deming Perkins and Alfred Beach which began 1890 Feb 14 to 1890 Mar 17 for $1
Folder 13: Real Estate records: 50 North St. Litchfield, CT "The Lindens", 1841 Jun 11Add to your cart.
An agreement between Frederick Deming and Charles Deming, Mary Deming, and Lucretia Deming regarding the maintenance of fences for the Deming homestead in Litchfield.
Folder 14: Release of Trusteeship, 1855 Mar 5Add to your cart.
Lucretia Deming is the trustee under the last will of her parents Julius and has been released from trusteeship of Mary D. Hoppin, James M. Hoppin, Lucretia Deming Perkins, and Julius Deming Perkins. Two copies with a small hand written note.
Folder 15: Wills and Testaments, 1848-1865Add to your cart.
Lucretia Deming's last wills and testaments which have seen revisions and updates throughout the years. Lucretia's lawyer, Edgar S. Van Winkle assisted in some of the drafts with Julius Deming Perkins as the executor.
Item 1: Cash Book, 1867-1873Add to your cart.
Lucretia Deming keeps track of cash transactions which include birthday and holiday presents, wages, and other purchases. Also included are illness/disease descriptions and how to cure the diseases/ailments. Oversized item, stored in 3B Box 23.
Item 2: First National Bank of Litchfield book, 1879-1882Add to your cart.
Dates, who got paid, how much, and the dollar amounts are recorded. Oversized item, stored in 3B Box 23.
Item 3: Financial and Household Ledgers, 1845-1854Add to your cart.
Includes detailed notes of what items were needed for Lucretia Deming to run her household and where it was purchased, the hours/wages of hired help along with the terms of their contract.  Oversized item, stored in 3B Box 23.
Item 4: Financial and Household Ledgers, 1855-1858Add to your cart.
A day by day account of all household and personal expenditures for Lucretia Deming. Prices, weights, and descriptions of items are provided as well as settled transactions.  Oversized item, stored in 3B Box 23.
Item 5: Financial and Household Ledgers, 1859-1861Add to your cart.
Household and personal expenditures for Lucretia Deming are chronicled on a daily basis. Prices, weights, and descriptions of items are provided as well as settled transactions.  Oversized item, stored in 3B Box 23.
Item 6: Financial and Household Ledgers, 1866-1871Add to your cart.
Household and personal expenditures for Lucretia Deming are chronicled on a daily basis. Prices, weights, and descriptions of items are provided as well as settled transactions.  Also includes a list of all addresses for merchants, professionals, family, and friends that were patronized by Lucretia or her family. Oversized item, stored in 3B Box 23.
Item 7: Financial and Household Ledgers, 1883-1885Add to your cart.
Lucretia Deming chronicles expenditures, both personal and household, on a daily basis. Prices, weights, and descriptions of items are provided as well as settled transactions.  Oversized item, stored in 3B Box 23.
Item 8: Stock Holdings Book, 1825-1848Add to your cart.
Lucretia Deming’s detailed account of what stocks she owns, the yields, dividends, and transfers. Oversized item, stored in 3B Box 23.
Item 9: Union National Bank, City of New York, 1877-1885Add to your cart.
Bank book for Lucretia Deming which shows the date, dollar amount, and initials of the transaction. Oversized item, stored in 3B Box 23.
Sub-Series 3: Miscellaneous papersAdd to your cart.
Folder 1: Hired Help Agreement, 1846 Oct 24Add to your cart.
Work agreement between Margaret Clark and Lucretia Deming. Written in New York, NY for work to be performed in Litchfield, CT
Folder 2: "The Lindens" EnvelopeAdd to your cart.
The Lindens is the Deming Family home in Litchfield, Connecticut
Folder 3: Map of drains for Litchfield Dwelling, 1869 Aug 31Add to your cart.
Map of drains to Lucretia Deming's dwelling house in Litchfield, CT
Folder 4: Summer record book of visitors received and visits paid, 1884-1886Add to your cart.
Names, dates of visits, and duration is noted along with who Lucretia paid a visit to.  Birthdays are also included.
Folder 5: Tutor information for the sons of Col. Benjamin Tallmadage and Capt. Julius Deming, undatedAdd to your cart.
information on the tutor Thomas Day who was employed by Col. Tallmadge and Capt. Deming for their sons who all attended Yale College between 1773-1811.
Sub-Series 4: Real Estate recordsAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 24: Deming, MaryAdd to your cart.
Mary Deming (1798-1847) was a daughter of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1817-1838Add to your cart.
Item 1: Bacon, Asa, Jr. to Deming, Mary, 1817 Nov 25Add to your cart.
He is in his office with nothing to do, so he will write to her; Lucretia is gaining in health and is now clear in the faith that a widow may marry again; a brace of widowerers and a bachelor entered this town and one intended to have had a nip at her; news of family and friends.
Item 2: Deming, Mary Follett to Deming, Mary, circa 1832Add to your cart.
Writes regarding the death of her son, Charles Follett Deming.
Item 3: Deming, Mary to Deming, Lucretia, 1837 Apr 11Add to your cart.
Writes to her sister in Augusta, Ga., regarding Lucretia's upcoming journey; the health of their father; hope that their property may be preserved to them, the crash in New York is dreadful; discusses her religious belief and Maria and Roxanna; describes treatments to their father and her, Mary Perkins', and Mr. Bacon's attention to him.
Item 4: Deming, Mary to Perkins, Julius Deming; Perkins, Lucretia Deming; and Perkins, Mary Deming, 1838 Nov 28Add to your cart.
Writes with news of friends and family; snow in New Haven; her health; unsure when she will return to Litchfield.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1846, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Mary to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1846 Jan 21Add to your cart.
Sent from Hartford, CT to her nephew Julius in New Haven, Mary questions his comfort and wants to know if he received the feather bed and blankets.  She discusses the social happenings,  shares news of family and friends, and would like him to visit if his studies permit. Mary also comments that her cough has returned.
Item 2: Deming, Mary to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1846 Mar 3Add to your cart.
A letter sent to Julius Deming Perkins in New Haven discusses family activities, when Mary expects to return to the “Hills”, and how travel on snow covered grounds can be hard with the weather being wet and muddy. She shares news of neighbors and mentions that Judge Storrs is in Litchfield with court adjourned until April 1st.  They look forward to seeing him and socializing with friends and neighbors; she would also like to see the snow plough.
Item 3: Deming, Mary to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1846 Mar 12Add to your cart.
In a letter sent to New Haven, Mary tells Julius that travels from Hartford to Litchfield are very perilous with snow drifts causing the wheels to break through and tip the carriage. The roads are wet and muddy. She fears she will not be able to travel until after April 1st.  Julius’ uncle sent them a new driver and her cough is still bothering her. His aunt Lucretia is please with his neat penmanship.
Item 4: Deming, Mary to Perkins, Mary Deming and Perkins, Julius Deming, 1846 Jun 22Add to your cart.
Mary addresses this letter to both her niece and nephew and shares that Aunt Lucretia is recovering from a painful illness. She is still very thin and pale but her appetite is improving. Litchfield is dull at the moment but mentions visitors like Judge Storrs and Elizabeth Ellsworth as well as news of family and friends.
Item 5: Deming, Mary to Perkins, Julius Deming and Perkins, Lucretia Deming, 1846 Jul 10Add to your cart.
Mary hopes Julius’ July 4th holiday was pleasant.  She discusses who was in town, social activities, and parties that took place. News of neighbors, friends, and family is shared.
Item 6: Deming, Mary to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1846 Aug 20Add to your cart.
In today’s letter to Julius, Mary notes that it’s cool, cloudy, and dull in Litchfield. There is a fire in the parlor to take the chill away. The social happenings of the town are discussed and an impudent servant was dismissed as she could no longer be tolerated.
Item 7: Deming, Mary to Perkins, Julius Deming, [1846]Add to your cart.
Mary lets Julius know that he needs to be very careful with his health. The medicine will make him feel badly but hopes it will help with is recovery.
Item 8: Deming, Mary to "brother", undatedAdd to your cart.
Written in pencil, Mary tells Julius not to regret he was not with Mary during her sickness as her room was dark and he would not have been able to distinguish her features. Some of the handwriting is illegible.
Folder 3: Bills and receipts, 1841-1847Add to your cart.
Item 1: Receipt, 1841 Jan 29Add to your cart.
Purchase and delivery of 1200 pounds of straw at $5 per ton in Litchfield from Philip Beebe
Item 2: Receipt, 1841 Feb 1Add to your cart.
Purchase and delivery of three bushells of corn and three bushells of oats from A. Smith in Litchfield
Item 3: Receipt, 1841 Feb 13Add to your cart.
Purchase of geese feathers
Item 4: Receipt, 1841 Nov 17Add to your cart.
$0.75 was spent to have Benjamin Moore Sr. mend a brass kettle in Litchfield
Item 5: Receipt, 1843 Feb 4Add to your cart.
From January 5 to February 3, wood was purchased and delivered by Mr. A. Smith in the amount of $10.35 for the Litchfield home.
Item 6: Receipt, 1843 Mar 27Add to your cart.
Medical visits from Dr. Welch in Litchfield starting 1836 Apr 5 to 1844 Feb 3. Included are the visits, the dispensing of advice and medicines, plus the application of leeches.
Item 7: Receipt, 1843 Jun 26Add to your cart.
Taxes paid to the town of Litchfield by Mary Deming in the amount of $20.37
Item 8: Receipt, 1843 Sep 6Add to your cart.
Purchase of one mahogany cabinet from David Bulkly in Litchfield costing $15
Item 9: Receipt, 1843 Sep 30Add to your cart.
purchase of one wardrobe from David Bulky in Litchfield costing $40
Item 10: Receipt, 1843 Dec 15Add to your cart.
The purchase of a pig from Benjamin W. Mason in the amount of $16.38
Item 11: Receipt, 1844 Dec 26Add to your cart.
$15.72 was spent to purchase a parlor stove, fire-board, and elbows from Mr. Morse.
Item 12: Receipt, 1845 Oct 30Add to your cart.
$0.83 was paid for candles and eggs in Litchfield.
Item 13: Receipts, 1846 Apr 22Add to your cart.
Purchased from L. J. Smith of Litchfield in the amount of $1.20 were codfish, cheese, and a dozen plates.
Item 14: Receipt, 1846 May 23Add to your cart.
$6.14 to David Marsh for butter, lard, and turkey
Item 15: Receipt, 1846 Jul 1Add to your cart.
From June 11 to June 28, 1846 beef, lamb, and veal was purchased in the amount of $3.48 from B. Pendleton
Item 16: Receipt, 1846 Oct 3Add to your cart.
Purchase of butter and eggs from David Marsh
Item 17: Receipt, 1846 Dec 19Add to your cart.
Two loads of maple, a load of oak, and two loads of walnut wood in the amount of $11 in Litchfield from Chas. Buel.
Item 18: Receipt, 1847 JanAdd to your cart.
Medical visit from Dr. L. Buel for $1.50
Item 19: Receipt, 1847 Oct 29Add to your cart.
From October 5 to October 29, 1847 beef and mutton was purchased from William Buel for $1.09
Item 20: Receipt, before 1847 Sep 29Add to your cart.
Meat purchased from  William Buel includes lamb, beef, and pork in the amount of $2.03 fo the month of September
Item 21: Receipt, before 1847 Dec 24Add to your cart.
Purchased from William Buel was 112 pounds of beef in the amount of $5.60
Folder 4: Bills and receipts, 1831-1840Add to your cart.
Item 1: Receipt, 1830 Jun 28Add to your cart.
Purchase of one pair of andirons from P.W. Tucker in New York.
Item 2: Receipt, 1831 May 20Add to your cart.
Purchase  of a hair mattress with cotton tick in the amount of $20.00 from Joseph Trulock in New York.
Item 3: Receipt, 1833 Jan 28Add to your cart.
Payment in the amount of $1410.25 to Kellogg & Baldwin, Co. for dates of service 1833 Jan 28, Apr 16, May 3, Jun 3, and Nov 28. Bill paid in full on 1834 Feb 8.
Item 4: Receipt, 1833 Jan 28Add to your cart.
From New York, a reciept noting that Mary Deming's dividends from the Merchants and Union Bank in the amount of $313.75 will be credited on the books of Kellogg & Baldwin with interest being paid.
Item 5: Receipt, 1833 Apr 16Add to your cart.
Paid by Fred Deming, $350 was placed to the credit of Mary Deming with Kellog & Baldwin.
Item 6: Receipt, 1835 Apr 10Add to your cart.
Proof of payment to Dr. Buel for medical visits on 1835 Apr 10 and 1835 Sep for both Mary and Dororthy Deming with the full balance paid by her sister on 1835 Nov 3.
Item 7: Receipt, 1835 Nov 3Add to your cart.
William Deming had $2742 deposited in Mary Deming's name at the Phenix (sic) Bank in New York as noted by John Warren.
Item 8: Receipt, 1836 Oct 6Add to your cart.
Receipt from Rushton & Aspinwall, druggists in New York City, for dates of services 1836 Oct 6,  1837 Mar 6, and 1837 Apr 11.  Mar 6 includes the purchase of 50 of the best leeches for $10 and a bottle of ehx (sic) opium and Apr 11 was for hemlock plaster.
Item 9: Receipt, 1837 May 24Add to your cart.
Medical bill from Dr. William Buel for Mary Deming (dates of service: 1837 May 24, May 29, Jun 19), Lucretia Deming (dates of service: 1837 Jun 12, Jun 13, Oct 20), Charles Deming (1837 Jul 14 and Oct 20)
Item 10: Receipt, 1837 Jul 16Add to your cart.
Receipt for Mary Deming to Charles Deming for a silver salver weighing 30 ounces from Marquand & Co. of New York and valued at $58.12 and two large silver pitchers (approx. a little over 37 ounces each) from the estate of the late Julius Deming, Sr. valued at $151.99. Payment was received by Lucretia Deming and Charles Deming.
Item 11: Receipt, 1837 Jul 25Add to your cart.
From Mary Deming to Charles Deming the purchase of bocking baize and various stoves totalling $196.67. Received payment in full of Lucretia an Charles Deming in Litchfield.
Item 12: Receipt, 1837 Sep 5Add to your cart.
Seven months of Mr. Thomas Coe's services in Litchfield for $175
Item 13: Receipt, 1837 Sep 23Add to your cart.
For the purchase of butter starting 1837 Jun 10 to 1837 Sep 23 to Matthew Moss, Litchfield
Item 14: Receipt, 1838 Sep 27Add to your cart.
Payment in full received by Dr. Hanson Abbe in Litchfield for the treatment of Mary Deming, dates of services are for 1836, 1837, and 1838.  Includes charges for advice, doctor's visits, opening an absess, prescription of camphor, application of leeches, camomile flowers, and various plasters.
Item 15: Receipt, 1839 Jun 27Add to your cart.
$2.98 was paid in full by Mary Deming for the 1838 state tax and Lucretia Deming paid $4.69.
Item 16: Receipt, 1839 Jul 17Add to your cart.
$25.30 was paid to Sam Buel for medicine such as a bottle of magnesia, castor oil, a box of pills, aether.
Item 17: Receipt, 1839 Jun 30Add to your cart.
Dr. William Buel's bill for medical services rendered from 1839 Mar 4 to 1839 Jun 30. A note indicates that when two or more visits have been made per day, one dollar has been charged in some instances.
Item 18: Receipt, 1839 Jul 22Add to your cart.
Professional services were rendered to Mary Deming in New York by Dr. Vanderburgh in the amount of $125.
Item 19: Receipt, 1840 Oct 8Add to your cart.
Litchfield
Item 20: Receipt, 1840 Oct 9Add to your cart.
Purchase of one ton mountain coal from Benton Barnarr in Litchfield for the amount of $12.75
Item 21: Receipt, 1840 Oct 29Add to your cart.
Purchase of one ton Lehigh Coal in Litchfield for $12.75 from Benton Barnarr
Item 22: Receipt, 1842 Nov 25Add to your cart.
Litchfield
Folder 5: 1846Add to your cart.
Quit claim deed which involves Lucretia, Mary, and Charles Deming for .25 acres in Litchfield bounded northerly by highway and Store's land, easterly by Benton's land, Electra Stone's, and by Marsh's land, westerly by highway and Prescott's land.
Folder 6: InvitationsAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Independence Ball, 1811 Jul 1Add to your cart.
Mary Deming’s presence is requested at Phelp’s Assembly Room in Litchfield with the event managers being Charles Deming, A.G. Fraser, and James Morrison
Item 2: Independence Ball, 1812 Jul 6Add to your cart.
Mary Deming’s presence is requested at Phelp’s Ball Room in Litchfield with the event managers being P.J. Clark, BC Howard, A Rogers, FA Tallmadge, R Wells.
Folder 7: Mechanics Bank papers, 1837Add to your cart.
Item 1: Personal banking figures, 1837 Nov 15Add to your cart.
Figures, dates, and account information written by Mary Deming
Item 2: Appointment to do banking, 1837 NovAdd to your cart.
Mary Deming appoints her attorney to transfer her shares of capital stock of the Mechanics Bank of New York and notes the  account numbers of the four certificates and 418 shares.
Item 3: Financial Notes, 1837 Nov 13Add to your cart.
Mary Deming’s notes regarding her financial matters. Includes dollar amounts, account numbers, as well as stock information.
Folder 8: Stock book, 1823-1851Add to your cart.
The stock book has Mary Deming appointing Charles Deming as power of attorney regarding stock transfers and balances of her accounts for the following banks:  Union Bank, Mechanics Bank, Phenix (sic) Bank, Bank of America, Fulton Bank, and Merchants Bank.  She keeps meticulous notes as far as where her money is and her return on investments.
Folder 9: Will and estate, 1847-1848Add to your cart.
Item 1: Will and Testament, 1838 Feb 23Add to your cart.
Mary Deming’s hand written will and testament that is signed, sealed, as well as witnessed. Lucretia Deming is named the executrix.
Item 2: Revision of Will, 1838 Oct 3Add to your cart.
Revision of will handwritten by Mary Deming that has been signed, sealed and witnessed by Lucretia Bacon, A. Bacon, and E. Champion Bacon.
Item 3: Payment by estate of Mary Deming, 1847 Jun 26Add to your cart.
Receipt and acknowledgement of payment from Isaac Stevens, Sexton for the estate of Mary Deming.
Item 4: Judge Appointment to assist Executrix in Mary Deming's Estate, 1847 Jun 26Add to your cart.
Samuel Buel and Francis Bacon, Esq. were appointed by Judge Charles Adams to assist the Executrix to perform an estate inventory in Litchfield.
Item 5: Copy of Mary Deming's estate inventory, 1847 Jun 30Add to your cart.
Mary Deming's estate is broken out by line including household (jewelry, livestock and their feed, wardrobe, farming tools, library, wardrobe), property, stock, and outstanding balances the estate is owed. Signed off by Buel and Bacon.
Item 6: Disbursement of Mary Deming’s estate pieces, 1847 Aug 9Add to your cart.
Mary Deming Perkins sent a receipt of willed goods to Lucretia Deming, executrix of Mary Deming’s estate confirming a gold pencil case, gold watch with the chain seal and key which belongs to the watch.
Item 7: Legal motion to settle Mary Deming estate, 1847 Oct 28Add to your cart.
Handwritten motion filed by Lucretia Deming executrix, a motion is asked for the administrative account to examine and settle the estate on 1848 Jul 1.
Item 8: Receipt for payment of monument, 1848 Jul 24Add to your cart.
Homer Atwill sent a receipt to Charles Deming for the payment of $60 for Mary Deming’s monument in Litchfield.
Item 9: Town and State Taxes, 1848 Aug 2Add to your cart.
Receipt of taxes for Litchfield and the state of Connecticut for Mary Deming’s estate in the amount of $30 to tax collector William Baldwin.
Item 10: Revision of estate inventory, 1848 Aug 16Add to your cart.
Copy of Mary Deming's estate inventory with updates/adjustments as submitted by Lucretia Deming, executrix.
Item 11: Update to estate inventory and division, 1848 Aug 18Add to your cart.
Copy of updates to Mary Deming’s estate inventory as well as how the estate will be divided.
Item 12: Legal fees for O.S. Seymour regarding M. Deming estate, 1848 Aug 31Add to your cart.
O.S. Seymour starting on 1846 Dec 5 performed various legal duties and assistances for the estate of Mary Deming. Charles and Lucretia Deming split the bill.
Item 13: Full execution of estate, 1848 Sep 18Add to your cart.
From Charles Deming in Litchfield, a hand written document which states Mary Deming’s estate has been fully executed and Lucretia Deming, executrix has no more legal liability.
Item 14Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 25: Deming, PownallAdd to your cart.
Pownall Deming (1749-1795) was a brother of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1782, 1792Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, Pownall to Deming, Julius, 1782 Oct 31Add to your cart.
Asks advice about purchasing notes; thinks he will have to end his days in the army unless his friends can help in business; tomorrow he shall determine on continuing in service.
Item 2: Deming, Pownall to Deming, Julius, 1792 Apr 11Add to your cart.
Advises his brother about purchasing in New York.
Sub-Series 26: Deming, William (1792-1865)Add to your cart.
William Deming (1792-1865) was a son of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1815, 1838Add to your cart.
Item 1: Deming, William to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1815 Jul 3Add to your cart.
He purchased the bonnets and has no doubt they will suit, for his taste is generally correct; if she or any of them should want little commissions executed, they will take care of them with pleasure.
Item 2: Deming, William to Deming, Charles, 1838 JanAdd to your cart.
Their father is very ill and will probably not live another night.
Folder 2: Appointment as aid de camp with the rank of captain, 6th Brigade of Militia in the State of Connecticut, 1823 Aug 4Add to your cart.
Signed by Morris Woodruff.
Folder 3: Deeds, 1831 Jul-AugAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Mary Lord to William Deming for land in Litchfield, Conn., 1831 Jul 12Add to your cart.
Item 2: Receipt, Mary Lord to William Deming, 1831 Aug 13Add to your cart.
Item 3: State of Connecticut to William Deming for land in Litchfield, Conn., 1831 Aug 11Add to your cart.
Folder 4: Receipt, J. Schieffelin to William Deming, 1804 Apr 17Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 27: Deming, William (1833-1891)Add to your cart.

William Deming (1833-1891) was a son of William Deming (1792-1865) and a grandson of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming

1 folder.

Folder 1: CorrespondenceAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Telegraph, 1865 Aug 13Add to your cart.
Wilson’s Social Telegraph received at 4:30 p.m. from Lenox Massachusetts to Miss Lotte Deming from William Deming Jr. Compliments of the season was sent. The telegraph was just completed and William is asking for a reply/answer.
Item 2: Deming, William to Deming, Charlotte, 1888 Mar 12Add to your cart.
William in Litchfield sends a letter to Charlotte in New York regarding his experiences with the Blizzard of 1888. Described are his difficulties with traveling or even crossing the street.  William practiced the cello all day to the point where his fingers hurt. The house is warm thanks to the new furnace and there is plenty of “pork & taters”.  Sketches are included to show Charlotte how much snow was received on March 12 and March 13th with the total being 6 1/2 feet. 2 pages plus envelope.
Folder 2: Miscellaneous, 1855-1888Add to your cart.
An assortment of tickets and passes which includes admittance to Yale College’s lectures on the principles and practices of surgery for the term 1855-1856, 1875 membership in the Litchfield County Agricultural Society, admittance to the May 1876 session for the House of Representatives, 1886 member certificate (no. 25) for the Litchfield Toboggan Club, 1888 Hartford & Connecticut Western Railroad pass, 1888 Housatonic Railroad pass, and 1888 New York & Northern Railway pass.
Folder 3: ReceiptsAdd to your cart.
Sub-Folder 1: 1876Add to your cart.
1876 Apr 10 receipt for Litchfield Laundry and 1876 Dec 1 receipt for J. W. Biglow of Litchfield, dealer in domestic lumber, shingles, lath, & etc.
Sub-Folder 2: 1877 FebAdd to your cart.
Various dry goods and food purchases from Litchfield merchants E.E. Champlin, Albert L. Judd, F.D. McNeil & Co., and A.S. Wright & Co.  Receipts are itemized and with prices.
Sub-Folder 3: 1877 MarAdd to your cart.
Various dry goods, food purchases from Litchfield merchants C.M. Cheney, E.E. Champlin, Foster Hurlbutt, Albert L. Judd, F.D. McNeil & Co., Charles Merriman, A.S. Wright & Co.  Bills are itemized and with prices and also included is a Litchfield tax receipt in the amount of $30.90 for 1876.
Sub-Folder 4: 1877 AprAdd to your cart.
Various dry goods and food purchases from Litchfield merchants C.M. Cheney, E.E. Champlin, Albert L. Judd, George Kenney, F.D. McNeil & Co., Charles Merriman, Mr. Sanford, Charles D. Wheeler, A.S. Wright & Co.  Bills are itemized and with prices.
Sub-Folder 5: 1877 MayAdd to your cart.
Various dry goods, food purchases from Litchfield merchants Charles Merriman, Adam Watts, A.S. Wright & Co. Bills are itemized and with prices. Three receipts are from Ludlow Thomas of Pine Street, New York, NY.
Sub-Folder 6: 1877 JunAdd to your cart.
Various dry goods, food purchases from Litchfield merchants Albert L. Judd, A.S. Wright & Co. Bills are itemized and with prices. Also included is a receipt for Litchfield dentist F.F. Cook on South Street.
Sub-Folder 7: unknownAdd to your cart.
Receipt for the purchase of shirts and collars from Harry W. Merells in Litchfield
Sub-Series 28: Goodrich, Eliza ChampionAdd to your cart.
Eliza Champion Goodrich (1797-1868) was a daughter of Henry Champion (1751-1836) and a nephew of Julius Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Goodrich, Eliza Champion to Deming, Dorothy Champion, 1818 Nov 12Add to your cart.
Writes to express her concern regarding cousin Clarissa's illness.
Sub-Series 29: Perkins, Clarissa DemingAdd to your cart.
Clarissa Deming Perkins (1795-1837) was the wife of Charles Perkins and a daughter of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1817-1830Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Clarissa Deming to Deming, Mary, 1817 Dec 15Add to your cart.
Expresses her gratitude and affection for Mary; Lucretia forwarded Mary a little book of Chinese characters and with it seven small pieces of paper for Mary's amusement; she has added an imitation of a painting of their saviour by Raphael to be viewed by candlelight.
Item 2: Perkins, Clarissa Deming to Deming, Julius, 1818 Feb 9Add to your cart.
Writes for advice regarding the purchase of a residence; details their finances and those of her husband's father Andrew Perkins; asks if Deming will provide them with financial assistance.
Item 3: Perkins, Clarissa Deming to Perkins, Abigail, 1830 Nov 1Add to your cart.
Writes about the revival in Rochester and its effect on her husband; he has sent her a letter on the subject of religion, from which she quotes; Mr. James' difficulties in the church; news of family and friends; her mother brought up a girl named Emma Kelly and would Abigail inquire about Emma's family in Norwich.
Item 4: Perkins, Clarissa Deming to Perkins, Abigail, 1830 Nov 6Add to your cart.
Expresses her joy that her husband has sent her a letter describing his religious conversion; it is all that she should have wished it to be; sickness of Charles William.
Item 5: Perkins, Clarissa Deming to Perkins, Abigail, 1830 Nov 17Add to your cart.
Reports on health of her family; letters she receives from her husband are beyond her powers of description; discusses the letters, in which he describes his faith and prayer meetings; wishes Abigail would visit; her sister Mary would like Abigail to get the finest yarn she can, because Mary thinks it will amuse her to knit some mittens.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1837 Jan-FebAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Ruggles, Nancy W. to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1837 Jan 21Add to your cart.
Rather than join her husband in Michigan, she is remaining in East Windsor for the sake of her children; news of family and friends.
Item 2: Shedden, J. R. to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1837 Feb 2Add to your cart.
Letter of condolence.
Item 3: Smith, Emily M. to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1837 Feb 4Add to your cart.
Offers sympathy regarding the death of Charles William; news of friends; state of religion in Rochester has been very low.
Item 4: Goodwin, Mary A. to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1837 Feb 6Add to your cart.
Offers sympathy regarding the death of Charles and Jane P.
Item 5: Perkins, Clarissa Deming to Deming, Charles, 1837 Feb 8Add to your cart.
Writes that she is grateful to hear they are well in Augusta; her feelings about the death of Charles William.
Item 6: Shedden, J. R. to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1837 Feb 25Add to your cart.
Is unable to get as much merino in New Haven as she wants, but may be able to obtain more through a friend who is going to New York; glad to hear good news about her church and family in her recent letter.
Item 7: C. T. D. [Charlotte Tryon Deming?] to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, [1837 Feb?]Add to your cart.
Expresses her sympathy regarding the death of Charles.
Item 8: Smith, [A.?] to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, [1837 Feb?]Add to your cart.
Expresses her sympathies regarding the death of Charles.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1837 MarAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Clarissa Deming and Deming, Mary to Deming, Lucretia, 1837 Mar 5Add to your cart.
Clarissa writes that she alone in the house; all others have gone to meeting; she misses Charles on this day more than any other; Mr. Brace is away and Mr. Perkins read two sermons; discusses the storm Lucretia and Charles survived; Judge Gould has asked that M. D. P. read parts of Lucretia's letter to him; news of family and friends; Mary adds a note regarding her health; will be glad to see them.
Item 2: Perkins, Clarissa Deming to Perkins, Abigail, 1837 Mar 23Add to your cart.
The death of Charles William was a heavy affliction on her; reflects on his death; her Mary wished Dickinson had retaken his portrait; describes Mary's attention to Charles; news of Julius and Lucretia; describes Caribbean trip of her sister and brother; discusses Mr. Perkins' business and his new shirts.
Folder 4: Other papers, 1821-[1837?], undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Instructions from Lucretia Deming should she not return from St. Croix, 1836 SepAdd to your cart.
Item 2: Prescription, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 3: Promissory note, Charles Deming to Clarissa Deming Perkins, 1835 Jun 2Add to your cart.
Item 4: Receipt for the purchase of fabric, 1821 Jun 26Add to your cart.
Item 5: [Specifications for the construction of the coffin of Charles William Perkins (1820-1837)?], [1837?]Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 30: Other Deming family papersAdd to your cart.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Pierpont, Evelyn to Ross, Stephen, 1796 Mar 7Add to your cart.
Regarding a debt owed to Julius Deming.
Folder 2: Correspondence, Gould, James to [?], [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Would be obliged if Mary or Lucretia Deming would send him a few of the illustrations of Sir Walter Scott's work.
Folder 3: Bills and receipts, Miss(es) Deming, 1832-1841Add to your cart.
Folder 4: Bills and receipts, Miss(es) Deming, 1842-1843Add to your cart.
Folder 5: Bills and receipts, Miss(es) Deming, 1844-1845Add to your cart.
Folder 6: Bills and receipts, Miss(es) Deming, 1846-1847Add to your cart.
Folder 7: Bills and receipts, Miss Perkins and Miss Deming, 1853 Apr 19Add to your cart.
Folder 8: Bills and receipts, Mr. Deming, 1819-1825Add to your cart.
Folder 9: Bills and receipts, Mr. Deming, 1827-1857, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 10: Cancelled checks, Charles Deming and Lucretia Deming, 1850-1878Add to your cart.
Folder 11: Champion genealogy, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 12: Champion, Skinner, and Deming partership papers, 1790Add to your cart.
Agreements and accounts regarding a partnership among Henry Champion, Abraham Skinner, and Julius Deming to import horses from England.
Folder 13: Deed, State of Connecticut, John Lawrence, Treasurer to Henry Champion, Epaphroditus Champion, and Julius Deming for land in Litchfield, Conn., 1781 Sep 1Add to your cart.
Folder 14: F. & C. Deming & Co. papers, 1815-1816Add to your cart.
Item 1: Correspondence, F. & C. Deming & Co. to Deming, Julius, 1816 Sep 21Add to your cart.
Writes regarding receipt and crediting of $1,000 to Julius' account; a debt; business conditions in Litchfield and New York; failure of Vandervoort & Wooden; they are not pressed for money.
Item 2: Partnership agreement, Frederick Deming, Charles Deming, and William DemingAdd to your cart.
Folder 15: Deming, Clarissa Brainard, circa 1890 Oct 26Add to your cart.
Clarissa B. Deming note to Miss Buel with a list of names of girls who attended Litchfield Female Academy together with names of men they marries.
Item 1: Appointment of Andrew Kingsbury, Epaphroditus Champion, Shubal Abbee, William Heron, and Julius Deming as commissioners of the United States, 1798 Jul 17Add to your cart.
Signed by Pres. John Adams and Secretary of State Timothy Pickering. Currently stored in 18B:oversize box 13.
Sub-Series 31: PhotographsAdd to your cart.
3 folders; daguerreotypes; tintypes. Unprocessed.
Series 2: Perkins familyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins IngrahamAdd to your cart.
Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham Boswell (1775-1835) was a daughter of Andrew Perkins and Anne Turner Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1813-1832Add to your cart.
Item 1: [M. H.?] to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, circa 1813 Apr 19Add to your cart.
Describes events related to Asahel Hooker's last evening; his religious pronouncements and admonitions; Jabez Huntington was present and Hooker wished Huntington to pray with him; Hooker wished to see his neighbors, Capt. Perkins particularly; Hooker expired the morning of the 19th.
Item 2: Shepherd, L. R. to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1832 Oct 11Add to your cart.
Reports the death of Maj. Dallaber.
Item 3: [?], Frances to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, late 1820s?Add to your cart.
Frances writes to her aunt to implore her, if she is seeking the saviour, and have not yet, that she would not be discouraged.
Folder 2: Commonplace book with figures of country dances, circa 1790sAdd to your cart.
Legend "Betsy Perkins" on first page; a notebook page in the hand of Harriet Perkins enclosed.
Folder 3: Receipt, E. Butt, painter, plumber, and glazier, to Capt. Ingraham, 1803 Jun 20Add to your cart.
Receipt is from London. Capt. Solomon Ingraham was Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham Boswell's first husband.
Sub-Series 2: Hoppin, James MasonAdd to your cart.

James Mason Hoppin (1820-1906) was the husband of Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin, a daughter of Charles Perkins and Clarissa Deming Perkins.

2 folders.

Folder 1: Correspondence, 1853-1902Add to your cart.
Item 1: Hoppin, James Mason to an unknown recipient, circa 1852Add to your cart.
A note of thanks is written to an unknown recipient on monogrammed note paper. Hoppin expresses a desire to make some little gift as an expression of respect and is grateful for continued and repeated kindness to his family.
Item 2: Hoppin, James Mason to Lucretia, 1853 Feb 11Add to your cart.
Written in Salem, Massachusetts, Hoppin expresses a sincere thank you for the gift of a Morse atlas as he is “entirely established and set up in the geography department” “which is indispensible.”  Mary feels remorse for the passing of her friend Elizabeth for she was a true friend and death cannot separate them.  Both Bennie and Fred were pleased with their gifts in the box and news of their development is shared as well.
Item 3: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1888 Jan 1Add to your cart.
A letter written in Berlin, Germany describing what Hoppin has seen of the city, museums and other sites he has visited, as well as how he feels about the city. He thinks Mary would approve. He attended a lecture on jurisprudence and even took his old seat.
Item 4: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1888 Jan 14Add to your cart.
A letter written in Berlin, Germany at the Hotel de Nord.  Mason describes his journey to Berlin from Dresden in a neat and pleasant car albeit it shaky. It kept him in constant motion from one side to the other but enjoyed the trip. The city has grown a lot since the last time he was there and the hotel is conveniently situated.  He describes the shops as very fine, attended the theater, walked about the city, and includes musings and other details of his day for Mary.
Item 5: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1888 Jan 18Add to your cart.
A letter written in Berlin, Germany on a piece of stationary from the Hotel Bellevue in Dresden, Hoppin writes to both Mary as well as Cousin James.  Also included is a short note on the same paper from a Marie de Waldenes. Discussed are various activities such as attending the opera to hear Carmen by French composer Bizet and wanting to go to the Hohenzollern Museum to view relics from Queen Louisa.
Item 6: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1888 Jan 26Add to your cart.
A letter written in Weimar, Germany at the Hotel Erbprinz, Hoppin writes to Mary that he was sorry to leave Berlin and hopes she had a comfortable journey “home”. Observations are made of the surroundings as well as the people he encountered.
Item 7: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1888 Jan 27Add to your cart.
Written on stationary from Rohrig’s Hotel in Eisenach Germany, Hoppin lets Mary know he is staying in the same room as Goethe who had it for a half year and a snow storm was encountered on the way to the hotel.  The performance of Hamlet Hoppin saw was exceptionally fine and there are three Oxford students who were reading German literature at the hotel.
Item 8: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1892 Jul 23 - 24Add to your cart.

The letter was written in Baddeck Nova Scotia, Canada to Mary with details on Jul 23rd about places that Hoppin has visited along with people he has met. He took a boat ride across the bay to visit Mr. Bell’s (even though he was not there) workshop and studio where an invention to use electricity to heat water as well as the telephone, an instrument to measure deafness, as well as others.  Hoppin shares observation on the scenery, landscape, and residents.

On July 24th, Hoppin went to the Presbyterian Church and heard Professor Pollock who presented an interesting sermon. Hoppin comments and describes Gaelic sermons as he had never heard the language spoken before where he could not detect some phrases or word or meaning.  He has been introduced to three members of parliament one of which was in his shirt sleeves.  He discusses his accommodations with the room having but one window by the bed and none of the comforts of their New Haven or Litchfield homes.

Item 9: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1897 Jan 8Add to your cart.
James tells Mary of the cold winter morning in New Haven and she must be enjoying the climate of Boston.  He hopes his upcoming book will be well received and available in Boston since it is a true art culture. He discusses other professors and their theories and philosophies.
Item 10: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1899 Mar 7Add to your cart.
Written in New Haven, Hoppin tells Mary he sent in his resignation of the Yale professorship which is to take place at the close of the college year. He has been connected with the school for 38 years as an instructor- a long stretch of service with the last year being satisfactory.  Aunt Mary has a bronchial cold and hopes she will be up again soon. The weather is mentioned (a small blizzard) as well as news of other family and friends.
Item 11: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1902 Sep 27Add to your cart.
Written in New Haven, Hoppin broke his left arm three weeks ago while going to see Mary’s lot of land on Prospect Street.  He stumbled over a protruding rock (he called it the Matterhorn) in the street and fell. Luckily Pastor Provost helped him up and they walked back to the house which his face looking like he had been in a fight. Hoppin thinks Mary’s letters are charmingly descriptive,  a pleasant and varied journey.
Item 12: Hoppin, James Mason to Perkins, Jr., Julius Deming, 1904 Dec 4Add to your cart.
A copy of a letter originally written in New Haven to Deming (Hoppin’s nephew) which praises the young man’s character,  actions, and speaks to life's challenges.  The copy was made on the back of a Aitken, Son & Co. of New York sale flyer.
Item 13Add to your cart.
Folder 2: MiscellaneousAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Childrens poem cards with cloth drawstring storage bag, 1823Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
Eleven poems for children with yellow and white cloth drawstring storage bag. Topics include On Spring, The Bee, The Bible, The Childs Evening Hymn, The Childs Morning Hymn, The Lily of the Valley, The Orphan, The Shepherd Boy, and Youthful Dedication.  The poems are printed on heavy card stock with hand colored pictures.
Item 2: Receipts, 1857 & 1870Add to your cart.
Two receipts with one being dated 1857 April 9 for Adams & Co. Package Express for one box to be transported from New York, New York to Salem, Massachusetts. Other receipt is dated 1870 May 13 for Steamer Continental with goods being sent from New York, New York to New Haven, Connecticut.
Item 3: Tour Guide and Diary for Europe, unknownAdd to your cart.
A handcrafted and written personal tour guide and book for France, Italy, Western Germany, Holland, Belgium, and Great Britain. Details include dates of arrival, places to see, stay, and eat at as well as all cities and towns visited. There is a color map of Turkey in Asia, Caucasia Provinces of Russia with an ad for John W. Quincy, 98 William Street, New York who is an agent for furnaces making anthracite and coal is included.
Folder 3: ReceiptsAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 3: Hoppin, Mary Deming PerkinsAdd to your cart.

Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin (1824-1905) was the wife of James Mason Hoppin and a daughter of Charles Perkins and Clarrisa Deming Perkins.

11 folders. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 4: Perkins, AbigailAdd to your cart.

Abigail Perkins (1795-1875) was a daughter of Andrew Perkins and Elizabeth Taylor Perkins and the sister-in-law of Clarissa Deming Perkins.

In addition to the papers listed below, there are 8 folders of papers created after 1840 that have not been processed.

Folder 1: Correspondence, 1821-1822Add to your cart.
Item 1: King, Mary O. to Perkins, Abigail, 1821 Jan 19Add to your cart.
Expresses to her cousin her sympathies regarding the low state of Harriet's health; news of family.
Item 2: Perkins, Abigail to King, Mary O., 1821 Oct 1Add to your cart.
News of family and friends; misses Harriet.
Item 3: Perkins, Abigail and Perkins, Charles to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1822 Apr 17Add to your cart.
Writes regarding news of family and friends; the Universalists' new church.
Item 4: King, Mary O. to Perkins, Abigail, 1822 Oct 26Add to your cart.
Writes to espress sympathies regarding the death of Perkins' father; news of family.
Item 5: Perkins, Abigail to [King, Mary O.?], 1822 Nov 19Add to your cart.
Writes to express concern for [King?]'s health; regrets she and others could not visit while her husband was alive; reflects on passing of near and dear friends, including her father; news of family.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1827-1828Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Abigail to King, Mary O., 1827 Mar 19Add to your cart.
Has been unsettled removing from one family to another; unsure of where she will remain; thinking of dividing her time between Norwich and Rochester; news of family and friends.
Item 2: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1827 Jun 15Add to your cart.
Describes here journey to Rochester by way of New York City and the Erie Canal; her impressions of Rochester; her plans uncertain.
Item 3: King, Seth to Perkins, Abigail, 1827 Sep 22Add to your cart.
Reports the death of the daughter of his sister Mary.
Item 4: Perkins, Abigail to King, Mary O., 1827 Oct 6Add to your cart.
Offers condolences for the loss of King's daughter Mary; unable to comply with King's request to spend the winter with her; reports the death of her brother's infant daughter.
Item 5: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1828 May 27Add to your cart.
News of family and friends; visit to Canandaigua; invites Boswell to visit.
Item 6: Perkins, Abigail to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1828 Aug 19Add to your cart.
Writes about Clarissa's health; Clarissa's children; Charles' business activities; news of friends and family; items purchased; her activities.
Item 7: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1828 Aug 20Add to your cart.
Writes about Clarissa's health; it has frustrated Charles' plans; she will never be able to return here; it is all unfortunate for him, but he is determined to make the best of it; news of family and friends.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1829-1830Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1829 Mar 12Add to your cart.
Reports on the weather; Clarissa's, Charles', and her plans to travel to Litchfield; the house they are living in; news of friends and family; speculates what Norwich is like; comments on the many marriages; exertions there to prevent boats running on the sabbath.
Item 2: Hooker, Faith F. to Perkins, Abigail, 1829Add to your cart.
Suggests that the writings of Abigail's sister Harriet on religion should be useful to the world in a memoir; asks what Abigail's feelings are on the subject of religion.
Item 3: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1829 Oct 13Add to your cart.
Comments on religious revival in Norwich; explains her delay in returning; health of Clarissa and Mary; Charles asks Capt. Boswell to make necessary repairs to Charles' house and send him the bill.
Item 4: Perkins, Abigail to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1829 Dec 8Add to your cart.
Describes journey after they were separated in Newburgh; revival meetings in Norwich; news of family and friends; describes Norwich; a note for little Mary.
Item 5: [Stevens, D.?] to Perkins, Abigail, [circa 1829-1831]Add to your cart.
Writes from Rochester and discusses church affairs and their minister; an account published in The Craftsman; Perkins' uniting with the church.
Item 6: Perkins, Abigail to Perkins, Charles, 1830 Nov 16Add to your cart.
Describes her joy after reading Charles' letter to Clarissa professing his religious devotion; she thinks it best not to visit him in Rochester at that time.
Item 7: Perkins, Abigail to King, Mary O., 1830 Dec 17Add to your cart.
Describes religious awakening of her brother; quotes from his letter; he should now be in Litchfield; she will not be travelling due to the season.
Folder 4: Correspondence, 1831-1835Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1831 Mar 17Add to your cart.
Travelling is too bad at that time to return; family in Litchfield is well; enjoys their brother's religious conversion; discusses admittance to the church and religion; health of Mrs. Perkins.
Item 2: Perkins, Abigail to [King, Mary O.?], 1831 Jun 5Add to your cart.
Spent part of the winter and spring with her brother's family in Litchfield; her brother his much engaged in religion and thinks he never knew what happiness was before; he will probably leave Rochester as soon as he can complete his business, quite a sacrifice on his part; the revival in Rochester is on the decline; meeting of ministers in Litchfield; revival in Westfield.
Item 3: Perkins, Abigail to Murdock, Miss [?], [1833 Apr?]Add to your cart.
Draft of a letter in which Perkins wishes to espress to Miss Murdock the indignities Perkins felt on reading Miss Murdock's communication regarding their mutual friend Mr. James. On the reverse is a paragraph in Perkins' hand that begins "I have now publicly profess'd my faith in Christ."
Item 4: Perkins, Abigail to Dickinson, James T., 1835 JanAdd to your cart.
Writes regarding the death of an unidentified female and others; religious matters; inquires about articles the ladies are furnishing and making for him.
Item 5: Perkins, Abigail to Perkins, Charles and Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1835 Feb 7Add to your cart.
Writes regarding the death of their sister, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham Boswell.
Item 6: Dickinson, James to Perkins, Abigail, 1835 Feb 23Add to your cart.
Last few weeks he has been confined to his room; offers condolences regarding her sister; undetermined when he will sail, two others are also going to southeastern Asia and they shall probably go in the same boat; discusses list of articles; his friends should not prepare them if they go against the grain of anyone.
Item 7: Morgan, Parmelia Taylor to Perkins, Abigail, 1835 Apr 7Add to your cart.
Writes to offer condolences regarding the death of Perkins' sister.
Folder 5: Correspondence, 1836-1838, [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Item 1: Dickinson, James T. to Perkins, Abigail, 1836 Dec 29Add to your cart.
Writes from Singapore regarding his and others' health; describes sights and sounds; Islamism; the house he is staying and its occupants; make-up of citizenry; his preaching.
Item 2: Perkins, Abigail to Dickinson, James T., 1838 May 10Add to your cart.
Writes of his and her health; describes a serious injury she received riding in a carriage; has left Norwich for Litchfield to be with her brother following the death of his wife; describes his family; her health is established and the Litchfield air is conducive to a restoration; news of friends; church in Litchfield.
Item 3: [?], Alicia to Perkins, Abigail, 1838 May 25Add to your cart.
Writes from Rochester regarding Perkins' brother leaving there; little William's death; their mutual friends Mr. and Mrs. James; the church; some indications of a revival; news of friends; misses Perkins; gave her pleasure to know that Perkins had made a profession of religion.
Item 4: Ripley, Eliza to Perkins, Abigail, 1838 Jul 13Add to your cart.
Introduces Alicia Blatchford, who will be going to Litchfield.
Item 5: Morgan, Parmelia Taylor to Perkins, Abigail, 1838 Dec 14Add to your cart.
News of family and friends; Angeline's death; Mr. Brace's preaching.
Item 6: Ford, Sarah A. to Perkins, Abigail, [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Wishes to address the state of their pastor's, Mr. James, pecuniary affairs by making a handsome New Year's present in money.
Folder 6: Account of the death of Harriet Perkins, 1821Add to your cart.
Folder 7: Copy of Charles Perkins to Clarissa Deming Perkins Oct. 28, 1830 letter, 1830Add to your cart.
Contains a copy of the letter in which he declares his religious conversion and writings and extracts relating to religious belief.
Folder 8: Copy of Joseph Johnson to Samson Occam Oct. 1, 1773 letter, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 9: Diary, 1819-1837Add to your cart.
Folder 10: Diary, 1834Add to your cart.
Folder 11: Extract from William James' sermon, 1829 May 3Add to your cart.
Folder 12: Handwriting exercise and award, 1810Add to your cart.
Folder 13: Invitation to Yale Commencement ball, 1813Add to your cart.
Folder 14: Notebook, [1820s?]Add to your cart.
Notebook which contains tangram designs and a printed sheet illustrating sign language.
Folder 15: Sermons copied after the deaths of Elizabeth Taylor Perkins and Harriet Perkins, 1819, 1821Add to your cart.
Folder 16: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 17: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 18: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 19: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 20: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 21: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 22: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 23: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 24: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 5: Perkins, Andrew (1743-1822)Add to your cart.
Andrew Perkins (1743-1822) was married three times. Among his children were Andrew Perkins Jr. and Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham Boswell with his first wife Anne Turner and Charles Perkins, Harriet Perkins, Abigail Perkins, and Edward Perkins with his third wife Elizabeth Taylor Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1787-1795Add to your cart.
Item 1: Griswold, Roger to Perkins, Andrew, 1787 May 20Add to your cart.
Writes regarding payment for a deed for a house Perkins bought from Apthorp.
Item 2: Hillhouse, James to Perkins, Andrew, 1789 Sep 10Add to your cart.
Writes that he has not yet seen Apthorp; has has sent him on money; can give no information on Apthorp's necessity for money.
Item 3: Perkins, Andrew to [Perkins, Andrew, Jr.], 1795 Jul 15Add to your cart.
News of family; advice about going out on the schooner; has paid off some of Jr.'s notes; news he has heard from Barbados; Capt. Cook; offers advice about staying well in the West Indies.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1804-1812Add to your cart.
Item 1: Gracie, Archibald to Perkins, Andrew, 1804 May 7Add to your cart.
Encloses letters and copies of letters from Capt. Ingraham; reports that Capt. Ingraham's ship requires repair and he cannot be expected there for some time.
Item 2: Perkins, Andrew to Perkins, Edward, 1810 Aug 13Add to your cart.
News of family and friends; his recent travels in Connecticut.
Item 3: Perkins, Andrew to Smith, Francis, 1810 Dec 14Add to your cart.
Gives instructions regarding selling apples in Demarra and purchasing goods with the proceeds.
Item 4: [?] to "sister", 1812 Mar 12Add to your cart.
News of family; Harriet received a letter from Charles describing a great disturbance at Yale; reports on a letter from papa's brother in Demarara about a seized vessel. On reverse of the letter is a note from Andrew Perkins regarding Mr. Huntington, Esq. Clark and some money.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1819-1820Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Andrew to Taylor, Samuel, 1819 Jul 26Add to your cart.
Writes after the death of his wife and Taylor's sister with news of family; would like to hear from friends and Westfield; since he has not, he fears they do not want to hear from him; reflects on the death of his wife.
Item 2: Taylor, Samuel to Perkins, Andrew, 1819 Aug 27Add to your cart.
Offers condolences regarding the death of his sister and Perkins wife; news of family.
Item 3: Perkins, Andrew to Taylor, Samuel, 1820 Jun 5Add to your cart.
Writes that he is grateful for Taylor's letter; it was the only one he received from any of Taylor's dear sister's connections in Westfield; news of family; would like to hear from his brothers and sisters in Westfield; would like them to visit.
Item 4: Perkins, Andrew to Taylor, Jedediah, 1820 Jul 29Add to your cart.
Writes that he is very happy to receive Taylor's letter; discusses death of Taylor's brother Samuel; thinking of visiting Westfield in September with one of his daughters for company; Harriet has been in Providence for 5 weeks, now has a cold and fever; news of family and friends; would be gratified to receive a visit from any of their connections in Westfield.
Folder 4: Correspondence, 1821-1822Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Andrew to King, Mary O., 1821 Jul 28Add to your cart.
Describes their journey from Westfield; expresses his entire satisfaction in his visit; asks that she excuses his want of matter to make his letter agreeable to the female sex as he has not been accustomed to address ladies by letter; news of family.
Item 2: Perkins, Andrew to Morgan, Archippus, 1821 Jul 28Add to your cart.
Expresses his entire satisfaction at the very kind treatment he experienced when at Morgan's house; describes his journey to Norwich; news of family.
Item 3: Perkins, Andrew to Morgan, Archippus, 1821 Aug 22Add to your cart.
Expresses gratitude for the visit of Morgan's daughter; invites Morgan and his wife to Norwich.
Item 4: Perkins, Andrew to King, Mary O., 1821 Sep 17Add to your cart.
Reports on recent visits from family members; inquires of her about family.
Item 5: Perkins, Andrew to Taylor, Jedediah, 1821 Oct 1Add to your cart.
Expresses disappointment in not seeing Taylor when he was visiting Westfield last year; had a very agreeable visit there; describes visitors he has had.
Item 6: Perkins, Andrew to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1822 Aug 22Add to your cart.
Pleased that her health is better; many deaths among children in that place with the dysentery; news of family and friends.
Folder 5: Appointment to a committee to look into affairs that will concern the town in making the now proposed division of the township, 1789 May 1Add to your cart.
Folder 6: Brigantine Pierre papers, 1772Add to your cart.
Customs paper and let-pass issued by officials of Martinique. In French.
Folder 7: Sloop Olive papers, 1768 Dec 17Add to your cart.
Let-pass issued by Ulysses FitzMaurice in St. George and receipt for 10 shillings 6 pence for the use of Greenwich Hospital by John Miller, receiver for the ports of New London.
Item 1: Account book, 1763-1769Add to your cart.
Documents trade dealings, often involving the sloop Olive, in Liverpool, England, and the West Indies. An entry and a tipped-in account from 1769 indicates a transaction involving "2 Negroes." Currently stored in 3B Box 25..
Item 2: Log book of brigantine Marquis de Lafayette, 1782-1783Add to your cart.
Log book of two voyages, Elisha Hinman, Commander: voyage to the West Indies, commenced Oct. 10, 1872; voyage to Virginia and then Amsterdam, commenced Feb. 11, 1783. Currently stored in aisle 17B.
Sub-Series 6: Perkins, Andrew, Jr. (1774-1796)Add to your cart.
Andrew Perkins Jr. (1774-1796) was a son of Andrew Perkins and Anne Turner Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1789, 1795Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Andrew, Jr. to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1789 Sep 6Add to your cart.
Writes about his health, pineapple sent by Mama.
Item 2: Perkins, Andrew, Jr. to Perkins, Andrew, 1795 Jul 24Add to your cart.
Discusses Capt. Cook and payment of the dollar; other financial matters; speculation and insurance; has taken commissions; citizens in New York are much dissatisfied with the treaty; news of friends; lists goods received from Capt. Cook; the schooner is ready for sea; purchased a coop of ducks with Capt. Cook which he thinks will pay a profit.
Sub-Series 7: Perkins, CharlesAdd to your cart.

Charles Perkins (1792-1856) was the husband of Clarissa Deming Perkins and a son of Andrew Perkins and Elizabeth Taylor Perkins.

Oversize items are listed after the folder listing. In addition to the papers listed below, there are 14 folders of papers created after 1840 that have not been processed.

Folder 1: Correspondence, [1810?]-1829Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Edward, [1810?]Add to your cart.
Reports that mother will send up Edward's shirts next Wednesday. Written on a declamation on the subject of France during the American Revolutionary War written in the hand of Harriet Perkins, marked "Colchester Sepr. 6th 1809." The declamation is also marked "Plainfield October 10th 1810."
Item 2: Perkins, Charles to Deming, Julius, 1818 Feb 19Add to your cart.
With the benefit of Deming's advice, they have concluded to purchase the house in which they are residing.
Item 3: Perkins, Charles to Deming, Julius, 1818 Mar 6Add to your cart.
Acknowledges receipt of Deming's letter; order in the amount of $1,840 was deposited, there to remain until the delivery of the deed.
Item 4: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1826 May 30Add to your cart.
Describes the advantages of Rochester to Burlington; his business; expects to visit Norwich in July; investing in the Rochester bank.
Item 5: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1826 Jul 15Add to your cart.
Busy with business and friends visiting from New England; thinks Abigail will like Rochester; describes activities there; his upcoming cases; they have about as much business as they can do themselves.
Item 6: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Mary Deming, 1829 Dec 23Add to your cart.
Her papa has not forgotten her and will see her next spring at Litchfield.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1830Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1830 Jan 13Add to your cart.
Describes his office; news of family; furniture he sent from Rochester for Mrs. P.; will probably not visit Connecticut until May or April; describes Rochester; feelings about his situation.
Item 2: Perkins, Charles to Deming, Mary, 1830Add to your cart.
Glad to hear she has been a good girl; remembers her; looks at her portrait; will see her in spring.
Item 3: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1830 Sep 13Add to your cart.
Spent 7 weeks in Litchfield; visited in New York for possible future calculations; since his return, he has been gratified at his prospects; his rents have been good; discusses his future plans; he may appear to the world to be a gentleman of ease and leisure; he is in fact and in earnest a hard working and contriving man spending nothing but what is truly necessary.
Item 4: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, [circa 1830]Add to your cart.
Glad to hear of the revival in Norwich; discusses faith; churches are reviving in Rochester.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1831-[1835?]Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Charles and Perkins, Clarissa Deming to Perkins, Abigail, 1831 Dec 24Add to your cart.
Charles discusses health of family; proposes Abigail come to Litchfield; recents deaths in the family; this world now has but one thing of magnitude in his thoughts, that is, to make his calling and election sure; encloses $20; encourages Abigail to buy wood and enjoy a fire; he will provide whatever she needs to be comfortable; Clarissa offers sympathy for the difficult times through which Abigail and sister Boswell are passing; news of family; discusses church.
Item 2: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1832 Jan 19Add to your cart.
He will leave to see her without Clarissa next Monday or Tuesday; discusses scriptures he has read; sermons in chuch there; fears the Asiatic pestilence will visit our shores this coming year.
Item 3: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1834 Nov 5Add to your cart.
Expresses his sympathy regarding the death of Alfred E. Perkins
Item 4: Bacon, Asa to Perkins, Charles and Perkins, Clarissa Deming, [1835?]Add to your cart.
Declines and invitation to tea.
Folder 4: Correspondence, 1837-1839, [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1837 Jan 24Add to your cart.
Reports the death of his son Charles William.
Item 2: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1837 Jul 24Add to your cart.
Health of Mrs. Perkins; her treatments; has to contemplate the possibility that she will not live a great while; glad to have her come to visit; news of friends and family.
Item 3: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1837 Aug 7Add to your cart.
Reports the death of his wife; he will now look to Abigail to oversee the household, advise the children, and help him rear them; discusses her travel arrangements; Jane, the girl he brought from Rochester, takes care of children and household chores.
Item 4: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1838 Apr 5Add to your cart.
Writes about springtime and offers instructions on staying healthy, saying his prayers, being kind, and keeping the sabbath day holy.
Item 5: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1839 Sep 25Add to your cart.
His daughter Mary should see what a great privilege it is to attend her school; does not know when he will return; Mary's return to school; news of friends; Abigail's finances.
Item 6: Gould, James to Perkins, Charles, [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Wishes Perkins to call on him.
Item 7: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Perkins, Charles, [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Would like Perkins to take charge of the letters for Mr. Cushman etc.
Folder 5: Business papers, 1827-1840Add to your cart.
Folder 6: Deeds, 1834-1835Add to your cart.
One deed for property in Rochester, N.Y., one for property in Ashtabula, Ohio.
Folder 7: Handwriting exercise, 1805 Dec 9Add to your cart.
Folder 8: Invitations, [1810s?]Add to your cart.
Folder 9: Journal of a voyage from Norwich to Sandwich Bay on the north coast of America in the year 1807, 1807Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
Folder 10: Law practice, attorney license, Supreme Court of the State of New York, 1828 OctAdd to your cart.
Folder 11: Law practice, case accounts and meterological notebook, 1815-1828Add to your cart.
Folder 12: Law practice, certificate, admission as a counsellor in the Court of Chancery in the State of New York, 1826 Mar 20Add to your cart.
Folder 13: Law practice, certificate, admission as an attorney and counsellor of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1846 Feb 6Add to your cart.
Folder 14: Law practice, docket book, 1816-1825Add to your cart.
Folder 15: Law practice, notebook, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 16: Mortgage, 1833 Jan 10Add to your cart.
Charles and Clarissa Deming Perkins to Abigail Perkins.
Folder 17: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 18: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 19: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 20: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 21: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 22: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 23: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 24: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 25: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 26: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 27: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 28: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 29: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 30: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Daybook and register, 1816-1826Add to your cart.
Currently stored in 3B Box 25.
Item 2: Letter book, Pomeroy & Perkins, 1826-1828Add to your cart.

Copies of letters written in Rochester, N.Y., in connection with the land business.

Currently housed in 3A Box 29.

Item 3: Letter book, 1826-1830Add to your cart.

Records of land and land transactions in Rochester, N.Y.

Currently housed in 3A Box 29.

Item 4: Daybook and ledger, 1837-1851Add to your cart.
Includes diagram of the Perkins cemetery plot. Currently stored in 3B Box 25.
Item 5: Schedule of debts, 1844-1851Add to your cart.

Title page inscribed with "Schedule of all debts owing by me this day March 28, 1844, with int. all paid up, as expressed ...  containing also a brief statement of my relations of business with the late Maj. Joseph Perkins and also John A. Rockwell, Esq., as to some lands in the State of Ohio, now about ended as to both."

Currently stored in 3B Box 25.

Sub-Series 8: Perkins, EdwardAdd to your cart.
Edward Perkins (1796-1812) was a son of Andrew Perkins and Elizabeth Taylor Perkins.
Folder 1: Geography schoolwork, 1812 Apr 1Add to your cart.
Item 1: Arithmetic notebook, 1809-1810Add to your cart.
Later used as a scrapbook with clippings pasted over some of the mathematics lessons. Paper embroidery of a floral arrangement tipped in. Currently stored in 3B Box 25.
Sub-Series 9: Perkins, ElishaAdd to your cart.
Elisha Perkins (1741-1799) was a brother of Andrew Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Perkins, Elisha to Perkins, Andrew, 1762 Sep 20Add to your cart.
He would be glad to see Andrew at Plainfield.
Sub-Series 10: Perkins, Elizabeth TaylorAdd to your cart.
Elizabeth Taylor Perkins (1761-1819) was the wife of Andrew Perkins and a daughter of Eldad Taylor and Thankful Day Taylor.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Perkins, Elizabeth Taylor to Taylor, Thankful Day, 1802 Jan 20Add to your cart.
Copy of a letter in which Elizabeth writes about religion.
Sub-Series 11: Perkins, HarrietAdd to your cart.
Harriet Perkins (1793-1821) was a daughter of Andrew Perkins and Elizabeth Taylor Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1818Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Harriet to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1818 May 3Add to your cart.
Writes about Elizabeth's health and the benefit of the spa; news of family, friends, and visitors.
Item 2: Perkins, Harriet to King, John, Mrs., 1818 Nov 23Add to your cart.
Writes about health of her mother and of Mrs. King; her happiness found in her religion; news of family and friends.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1819Add to your cart.
Item 1: King, Mary O. to Perkins, Harriet, 1819 May 8Add to your cart.
Reports the death of her mother; news of family and friends.
Item 2: King, Mary O. to Perkins, Harriet, 1819 Jul 26Add to your cart.
Expresses sympathy regarding the death of Harriet's mother; has been visiting with her Stratford friends in hopes that the change of air will prove beneficial to her health; news of family.
Item 3: Perkins, Harriet; Perkins, Andrew; and Perkins, Charles to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1819 Nov 25Add to your cart.
News of friends and family; they miss Elizabeth.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1820, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Baldwin, Emily to Perkins, Harriet, 1820 Jan 6Add to your cart.
Has settled in housekeeping; has not heard of any news of Harriet's family since she last saw her; explains that this sabbath is important to all the Christians in New Haven; discusses religion.
Item 2: Perkins, Harriet to King, John, Mrs., 1820 Feb 21Add to your cart.
Writes about health of family; religion; death of her mother; her father would like to hear from friends in Westfield; news of friends.
Item 3: Perkins, Harriet to King, John, Mrs., 1820 Feb 21Add to your cart.
Copy of Perkins' Feb. 21, 1820, letter.
Item 4: Perkins, Harriet to Baldwin, Emily, undatedAdd to your cart.
Writes about health of her sister; news of family.
Folder 4: A catalogue of the young ladies who are members of the historical society, 1813Add to your cart.
Folder 5: Commonplace book, [1810s-1820s?]Add to your cart.
Folder 6: Commonplace book, [1810s-1820s?]Add to your cart.
Folder 7: Diary, 1807Add to your cart.
Kept while on board the brigantine Jane on a voyage to Antiqua.
Folder 8: Diary, 1812-1814Add to your cart.
Folder 9: Diary, 1813-1818Add to your cart.
Folder 10: Diary, 1818-1820Add to your cart.
Folder 11: Diary, 1820-1821Add to your cart.
Folder 12: Good texts of scripture, 1813Add to your cart.
Folder 13: Invitation, [1809?]Add to your cart.
Folder 14: School papers, 1809-1810, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 15: Statement regarding a covenant transaction with God, 1818 Aug 27Add to your cart.
Folder 16: Will, [1821?]Add to your cart.
Folder 17: Miscellaneous, undatedAdd to your cart.
A verse written on the reverse of a note regarding the death of Harriet Perkins' mother and a copy of a letter published in early nineteenth century journals under the heading "Secret Correspondence," which begins, "I cannot be satisfied my dearest friend"; the letter is signed Caroline and addressed to Miss Mary De Hautville, Paris, and appears to be in the hand of Harriet Perkins.
Sub-Series 12: Perkins, JosephAdd to your cart.
Joseph Perkins (1704-1794) was the father of Andrew Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Perkins, Joseph to Perkins, Andrew, 1768 Mar 28Add to your cart.
Intended to have given Andrew a visit before his departure, but now thinks it not probable; he informs Andrew of his his concern and wishes for him; offers his admonitions.
Folder 2: Correspondence, Perkins, Joseph to [Perkins, Simeon?], [1768?]Add to your cart.
He did not improve the last opportunity he had to give a father's advice, but will improve this, which may be the last I ay ever have; offers his admonitions. Reverse has a Nov. 29, 1768, letter written by Andrew Perkins to his brother regarding exchange of some goods.
Sub-Series 13: Perkins, Julius DemingAdd to your cart.

Julius Deming Perkins (1830-1911) was a son of Charles Perkins and Clarissa Deming Perkins and a grandson of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.

Account book at The Glebe, 1854-1867 housed in 3B Box 25.

Folder of advertisements and correspondence concerning the Shepaug Valley Railroad.

15 folders, 1 account book, and 1 diary. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 14: Quincy, Lucretia Deming PerkinsAdd to your cart.

Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy (1832-1883) was the wife of John Williams Quincy (1813-1883) and a daughter of Charles Perkins and Clarissa Deming Perkins.

7 folders and 1 account book. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 15: Rockhill, Edith PerkinsAdd to your cart.

Edith Perkins Rockhill (1870-1946) was wife of William Woodville Rockhill and the daughter of Julius Deming Perkins and Margaretta Dotterer Perkins.

Letterbook ca. 1900-1908 currently housed in 3A Box 29.

2 folders. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 16: Rockhill, William WoodvilleAdd to your cart.

William Woodville Rockhill (1854-1914) was the husband of Edith Perkins Rockhill.

Scrapbook ca. 1900 housed in 3A Box 29.

Scrapbook 1905-1907 housed in 3A Box 29.

1 folder. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 17: Taylor, EldadAdd to your cart.
Eldad Taylor ( 1708-1777) was the father of Elizabeth Taylor Perkins, wife of Andrew Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Taylor, Eldad to Taylor, Thankful Day, 1776 Nov 11Add to your cart.
Describes his journey and his health; items he purchased; news from Boston regarding American Revolutionay War incidents; militia; Gen. Howe has laid another hellish plot to destroy them, but it was discovered.
Sub-Series 18: Taylor, JohnAdd to your cart.
John Taylor (1762-1843) was a son of Eldad Taylor and a brother-in-law of Andrew Perkins.
Folder 1: Papers, 1783, 1803, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Taylor, John to Taylor, Eldad and Taylor, Thankful Day, 1783 Jun 25Add to your cart.
Writes from Yale about religion.
Item 2: Correspondence, Taylor, John to Perkins, Elizabeth Taylor, 1803 Oct 16Add to your cart.
Writes about the death of their mother and brother; health of his family.
Item 3: Bookplate, Rev. John Taylor, undatedAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 19: Other Perkins family papersAdd to your cart.
Folder 1: Biography of the family of Joseph and Jabez Perkins, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 2: Bills and receipts, Mr. Perkins, 1847-1849Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 20: PhotographsAdd to your cart.
1 folder; daguerreotypes. Unprocessed.
Series 3: Quincy familyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Quincy, EdmundAdd to your cart.
Edmund Quincy (1703-1788) was the great-great-grandfather of Mary Perkins Quincy.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Quincy, Edmund to Quincy, Katherine, 1774 Nov 30Add to your cart.
Writes about ships and troops in Boston; Parliament and Lord Nelson; America is like to be the means of saving Great Britain from political destruction; government of that nation has resolved to lay the foundation of despotism and subjugation on the colonies.
Folder 2: Quincy, Edmund to Scott, Dorothy Quincy Hancock, 1786 Oct 10Add to your cart.
Writes that he is informed that Gov. Hancock is attacked by the gout; Hancock is in Hartford; consoles with her and Hancock on the unfavorable occurence abroad, but hopes Mr. Bracket will soon be with them to yield necessary assistance; hopes the governor can return home before the upcoming cool season; news of family and her son.
Item 1: Notebook "Miscellaneous writings", 1737-1775Add to your cart.
Currently housed in 3A Box
Sub-Series 2: Quincy, John Williams (1813-1883)Add to your cart.

John Williams Quincy (1813-1883) was the father of Mary Perkins Quincy.

2 folders. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 3: Quincy, John Williams, Jr. (1868-1950)Add to your cart.

John Williams Quincy Jr. (1868-1950) was the brother of Mary Perkins Quincy.

1 folder. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 4: Quincy, Martha AtkinsAdd to your cart.

Martha Atkins Quincy (1797-1870) was an aunt of Mary Perkins Quincy.

1 folder. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 5: Quincy, Mary PerkinsAdd to your cart.View associated digital content.

Mary Perkins Quincy (1866-1921) was the daughter of John Williams Quincy (1813-1883) and Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy and a granddaughter of Charles Perkins and Clarissa Deming Perkins.

A partial finding aid to the Quncy's papers is available by clicking the digital content link.

In consideration of the number of people who handled the materials, the re-housing efforts, and the incomplete records regarding the origins of the documents, there is no possible way to determine or recreate original order. Materials are arranged and described in nine sub-series.  Folders and items within the sub-series are arranged alphabetically by creator. There were a few clues in several folders that indicated Quincy kept correspondence together according to the creator, and that she also maintained research files and writings. The existing evidence was used in the creation of the sub-series that comprise the collection so that they might replicate her arrangement as closely as possible. The sub-series are: Correspondence, Ephemera, Writings, Membership Organizations, Travel, Education, Accounts, Legal Papers, and Photographs.

In the Correspondence Sub-series, ephemera and clippings identified as belonging with a particular piece of correspondence are filed with that correspondence unless otherwise noted.  In the event that the enclosure was an object, such as a fabric or carpet sample, the item was removed to object collections storage for proper housing, and a note is included as to where the item may be found. The sub-series includes correspondence primarily to and from Mary Perkins Quincy. Correspondence to and from various generations of family members and friends is also included. The largest group of correspondence is the collection of letters between Quincy and Mary Deming Hoppin.  These letters span a 30-year period dating from 1875 until the time of Hoppin’s death in 1905, and include both sides of the correspondence. News-clippings, pressed flowers and other ephemera accompany many of the letters in this sub-series.

Sub-Series 6: PhotographsAdd to your cart.
2 folders. Unprocessed.
Series 4: Other papersAdd to your cart.
Folder 1: Correspondence, third-partyAdd to your cart.
Unprocessed.
Folder 2: Bills and receipts, third parties, 1784, 1830-1846Add to your cart.
Folder 3: Bills and receipts, unknown recepients, 1837-1843Add to your cart.
Folder 4: Collier & Buel, Litchfield subscription balls, 1793 JanAdd to your cart.
A receipt for printing invitations and an assembly ball listing.
Folder 5: Deed, Tallmadge, Benjamin to Butler, Charles for land in Litchfield, Conn., 1809 Aug 7Add to your cart.
Folder 6: Emancipation of Candace, a Negro servant girl, 1801 MayAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Emancipation certificate, 1801 May 4Add to your cart.
Signed by Lynde Lord.
Item 2: Emancipation certificate, 1801 May 5Add to your cart.
Signed by James Morris, Justice of the Peace, and Ephraim Kirby, John Welch, and James Marsh 2nd, Selectmen.
Folder 7: Invitation, 1800Add to your cart.
Folder 8: Indenture between Alexander Catlin and Reuben Webster regarding the apprenticeship of Samuel Seymour, 1797 Jan 26Add to your cart.
Folder 9: Land records regarding Josiah Stone, 1840sAdd to your cart.
Unprocessed.
Folder 10: Land survey, plan of the crotch of the river, 1767 Jul 3Add to your cart.
Folder 11: Land survey, property of Lynde Lord, 1801Add to your cart.
Folder 12: Miscellaneous business papers, [circa 1830s]-1877Add to your cart.
Folder 13: Miscellaneous, undatedAdd to your cart.
A note regarding Dr. Edward's opinion that the only healthy season there is from the April1st to July 1st; a verse, "Thompson's Liberty"; a paper scrap; and a wrapper.
Folder 14: Minutes of a New Haven missionary association, 1832-1833Add to your cart.
Folder 15: Music manuscripts, [1810s?]Add to your cart.
Folder 16: Publications, The petition of the Continental Congress, 1775Add to your cart.
Folder 17: Publications, In Congress, June 10, 1777, 1777Add to your cart.
Folder 18: Publications, In Congress, April 14th, 1778Add to your cart.
Folder 19: Publications, Prudential Committee of the American Board of the Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 1812 Jan 3Add to your cart.
Folder 20: Publications, news clippingsAdd to your cart.
Unprocessed.
Item 1: Publications, catalogue of the members of Yale College, 1797Add to your cart.
Lists Julius Deming (Jr.) in the freshman class. Currently stored in 18B:Oversize Box 13.
Item 2: Publications, Norwich Courier, 1821 Apr 11Add to your cart.
Contains an obitiuary of Harriet Perkins. Currently stored in 18B:Oversize Box 13..