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Deming, Perkins, and Quincy families papers

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Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Administrative Information

Detailed Description

Deming family

Perkins family

Quincy family

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Deming, Perkins, and Quincy families papers, 1762-1950 | Litchfield Historical Society

By Linda Hocking, Leith Johnson, and Nathan Koldys

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Collection Overview

Title: Deming, Perkins, and Quincy families papers, 1762-1950Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

Primary Creator: Quincy, Mary Perkins (1866-1921)

Other Creators: Champion family, Deming family, Deming, Julius (1755-1838), Rockhill, Edith Perkins (1870-1946)

Extent: 30.0 Linear Feet

Arrangement:

The papers are arranged in four series:

Series 1: Deming family

Series 2: Perkins family

Series 3: Quincy family

Series 4: Other papers

Date Acquired: 01/01/1921. More info below under Accruals.

Subjects: African Americans, African Americans - Connecticut - Litchfield, Business enterprises, Champion (N.Y.), Champion, Henry, 1751-1836, Champion family, China - Commerce, Colchester (Conn.), Deming, Julius, 1755-1838, Deming family, Great Britain - Commerce, Indentured servants, Lawyers - Connecticut - Litchfield, Litchfield (Conn.), Merchants - Connecticut - Litchfield, Military pensions - United States - Revolution, 1775-1783, Norwich (Conn.), Perkins family, Quincy, Mary Perkins, Quincy family, Revivals--United States, Rochester (N.Y.), Second Great Awakening, Slavery, United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783, West Indies - Commerce

Forms of Material: Account books, Business records, Checks, Commonplace books, Correspondence, Deeds, Diaries, Estate inventories, Financial records, Inventories, Invitations, Land surveys, Legal documents, Military records, Minutes, Petitions for bankruptcy, Sermons, Taxes

Languages: English, French

Scope and Contents of the Materials

The Deming, Perkins, and Quincy Families Papers document members of several prominent families who lived in the town of Litchfield, Conn. In the late eighteenth century, the patriarchs of each family earned wealth through their activities as merchants, traders, and investors, enabling them and many of the members of the next generations to live lives free from financial concern, if not outright luxury. The papers consist largely of correspondence, and also include collections of financial and legal papers, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, photograph albums, diaries, and calling cards and other printed materials. The papers of Mary Perkins Quincy (1866-1921) comprise most of the collection.

At this time, generally only papers created prior to 1840 have been processed, although all of papers in the collection have been listed in this finding aid. Mary Perkins Quincy's papers have been partially processed and a finding aid is available by accessing the digital content link.

The papers are arranged in four series:

Series 1. Deming family

Series 2: Perkins family

Series 3: Quincy family

Series 4: Other papers

The series related to the three families also include papers of other families associated by marriage.

Series 1. Deming family (2.71 lin. ft.)

Julius Deming (1755-1838) was a leading merchant of Litchfield's most prosperous period. In addition to his various business ventures, Deming was politically active in his town and in the new nation. Born in North Lyme, he moved to Litchfield after his 1781 marriage to his first cousin, Dorothy Champion (1759-1830) of Colchester, Conn. The papers in this series relate to members of both the Deming family and the Champion family.

During the American Revolutionary War, Deming served under Dorothy's father, Col. Henry Champion, the principal assistant commissary general for the Eastern Division of the Continental Army. Deming, who attained the rank of captain of cavalry, was with the convoy that crossed the Hudson River to deliver supplies to Washington's army at Valley Forge. A collection of papers, including account books, daybooks, ledgers, and correspondence document Deming's Revolutionary War activities. After the war, he established himself in trade by obtaining goods directly from England—an unusual practice at a time when most Connecticut merchants got their wares from New York and Boston, and there is extensive documentation relating to a trip he took to London during which he selected goods for importation to America. Deming's merchandise arrived in New Haven Harbor and was brought by wagon to Litchfield. From there, it was sold in shops owned by Deming and his partner, Col. Benjamin Tallmadge. The two had shops in Litchfield and other towns. In addition to their other goods from Europe and the West Indies, they once imported a cargo of horses from England. All of these business activities are documented in the collection. In the early 1800s, Deming bought shares in the Litchfield China Trading Company. The articles of agreement list Tallmadge, Oliver Wolcott Jr., the future secretary of the treasury, and Frederick Wolcott as the original partners. Oliver Wolcott, Jr. maintained an office in New York City, the location of the port from which their ship—the Trident—set sail. The company lasted until 1814, and the venture is represented in the collection. Deming's other business ventures included the manufacture of iron and a paper mill in Bantam. Little is known about the mill, but there is an agreement concerning the venture in his papers and a sample of its paper is in the Historical Society's collections. Deming's land investments in Champion, N.Y. are also documented in the papers.

Though a family genealogy described him as disliking public life, Deming held several elected and appointed offices. He served three terms in the House of Representatives, along with stints as a magistrate and the county treasurer. In addition, he was a member of the First School Society, a body in charge of both the town's schools and the burying ground. Deming was also instrumental in getting a courthouse built in Litchfield, and the papers contain documents detailing construction specifications and two documents related to architect William Spratts, who had a hand in its design and construction. In 1798, President John Adams appointed Deming, Epaphroditus Champion (see below), and three others commissioners "to provide for the valuation of lands and houses, and for the enumeration of slaves." The appointment certificate, signed by Adams, is one of the highlights of the collection.

Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming had eight children and all are represented in the papers. Julius Deming Jr. (1782-1799) died of disease while attending Yale College. Frederick Deming (1787-1860), Charles Deming (1789-1852), and William Deming (1792-1865) moved to New York City and formed a business partnership that lasted until the mid-1810s. The collection contains limited documentation of their enterprise. Frederick remained in New York and became president of the Union Bank, while Charles and William returned to Litchfield. Charles was plagued by bad health, and correspondence in the collection details his efforts to stay well through many doctors’ visits, treatments, and even a respite in the West Indies in the 1830s culminating with a harrowing trip back to the United States. Unfortunately, nothing proved particularly helpful. Three of the Demings’ four daughters remained unmarried. Dorothy Deming (1784-1835), Mary Deming (1798-1847) and Lucretia Deming resided in Litchfield. Lucretia would end up owning the family homestead as the last survivor of her generally unwell siblings. Clarissa Deming (1795-1837) married Charles Perkins (1792-1856) of Norwich, Conn., a Litchfield Law School student about whom more will be found in the discussion of the Perkins family below. In 1830, Perkins underwent a religious conversion, and Clarissa’s letters express her profound joy regarding the event. The siblings wrote many letters among themselves and their parents and chronicle their business activities, rising and falling health, travels in the United States and Caribbean, and news of their extended family and friends.

The wealth of the Deming family is revealed in family members’ journals and account books listing investments, income, and expenses, and for most members, there are estate papers that contain detailed inventories.

The Deming family series also contains a substantial collection of papers relating to the Champion family of Colchester. Henry Champion (1723-1797) began his military career at the age of 18 when he was appointed ensign of an Army company in 1741. He was a captain during the French and Indian War and in 1772 he was appointed a major in the colonial militia. In April, 1775, he was appointed a commissioner to supply all necessary stores and provisions for the American troops. Champion was appointed in 1778 as sole Commissary General of the Eastern Dept. of the Continental Army by Col. Peter Colt. In May, 1780, Col. Champion resigned his army commission the array and returned to his home in Westchester section of Colchester. He had been prominent in politics before he enlisted in the army, and continued to regularly elected in the 1780s and 1790s. Champion was married to Deborah Brainard Champion (1724-1789). They had nine children, including Henry Champion (1751-1836); Epaphroditus Champion (1756-1834); Dorothy Champion Deming (1756-1834), wife of Julius Deming; Mary Champion Bulkley (1762-1843); and Esther Champion Cleaveland (1766-1840). Champion married Sarah Brainard Lewis following the death of his first wife.

Henry Champion (1751-1836) enlisted in the Continental Army in 1775. He was an officer in battle of Bunker Hill, participated in the retreat of the American troops from Long Island, rendered services under Tadeusz Kosciusko in constructing the defenses at West Point, and led the first battalion of Connecticut Light Infantry at the capture of Stony Point, N.Y. Following the war, he returned to Westchester and entered politics and was active in obtaining a charter for the Phoenix Bank. He also had interests in the Connecticut Land Co. and was instrumental in the formation of the School Fund in Connecticut. Champion, Ohio, was named in his honor. Champion married Abigail Tinker Champion (1758-1818) and they had ten children, including Aristarchus Champion (1784-1871) and Abigail Champion Deming (1787-1835).

Epaphroditus Champion (1756-1834) also served in the Continental Army, serving under the direction of the commissary general in New York. In 1777, he returned to Colchester where he remained involved with providing provisions for the army until leaving the service in 1780. He was active in politics and the militia and successfully conducted trade in the West Indies. He married Lucretia Hubbard Champion (1760-1836) and they had three children, including Clarissa Champion (1785-1801).

Of particular note are the letters Epaphroditus Champion (1756-1834), Henry Champion (1723-1797), and his son Henry Champion (1751-1836) wrote during the American Revolutionary War. All three men, along with Julius Deming, were involved in supplying the American army with cattle, pigs, and other provisions. In addition to discussing commissary matters and his desire to leave service, the younger Champion wrote a letter in which he provided a detailed account of the Americans’ attack on Stony Point in 1777. A subsequent letter accuses the official account provided by commanding officer Maj. Anthony Wayne as having been willfully manipulated and flawed and suggests that Gen. George Washington himself had inadvertently perpetuated inaccurate information. Additional documentation related to the Revolutionary War is found in correspondence among family members and Julius Deming as they sought to obtain war pensions in 1834. In 1798, President John Adams appointed Julius Deming (see above), Epaphroditus Champion, and three others commissioners "to provide for the valuation of lands and houses, and for the enumeration of slaves." The appointment certificate, signed by Adams, is one of the highlights of the collection.

The Champions and Demings remained closely connected. They were involved in several business ventures together, including the importation of horses from England, and they are documented in the papers. Epaphroditus Champion wrote to Julius seeking advice. Dorothy Champion Deming, her brothers and sisters, various in-laws, and their children shared a long correspondence. Several of the cousins attended the Litchfield Female Academy together. One letter, from then-15-year-old Clarissa Champion to her cousin Dorothy Deming, is playful and gossipy, and comments in part on Napoleon Bonaparte and an acquaintance’s weight gain and frizzy hairstyle. Clarissa suddenly died one year later, and the families’ grief is expressed in their correspondence.

Letters written by members of Deming and Champion families occasionally mention slaves or servants. There are a number of references to a servant named Vira. Julius Deming’s papers include her emancipation document. The collection contains one letter written by Vira to Dorothy Deming in June, 1802. (Search on “Vira” to find the relevant documents.) Two 1812 letters from Henry Champion (1751-1836) to Julius Deming discuss Kate, a former slave of Champion’s father.

Series 2. Perkins family (1.25 lin. ft.)

Papers in Series 2, Perkins family, relate to the family of Andrew Perkins (1743-1822), a Norwich, Conn., sea captain and merchant. In the 1760s and early 1770s, he made several voyages to the West Indies, England, and possibly elsewhere, and these are documented in Perkins’1763-1769 account book and customs papers. The 1763-1769 account book also contains an accounting entry and a separate statement that include references to “2 Negroes.” During the American Revolutionary War, Perkins and various business associates funded privateers. At this same time, they also organized at least two non-privateering ventures that involved the brigantine Marquis de Lafayette, Elisha Hinman, Commander. The papers contain the ship’s log book documenting two voyages, one in 1782 to the West Indies and one in 1783 to Virginia and The Netherlands.

Perkins was married three times, the first to Anne Turner Perkins (1747-1785); second, Mary Niles (1764-17867); and third, Elizabeth Taylor Perkins (1761-1830). The collection contains several letters from Elizabeth’s father Eldad Taylor (1707-1777) and her brother Rev. John Taylor (1762-1843).

Andrew Perkins had a total of 13 children with his first and third wives. Only five lived into adulthood: Andrew Perkins (1774-1796), Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham Boswell (1776-1835), Charles Perkins (1792-1856), Harriet Perkins (1793-1821), and Abigail Perkins (1795-1875).

Charles Perkins got a taste of the sea when he was 15. A journal found in the papers chronicles a voyage he took to Sandwich Bay in Canada. In 1813, he attended the Litchfield Law School, where he met Clarissa Deming, a daughter of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming, who would become his wife. After he completed his studies, he returned to Norwich to set up his practice. The papers contain his notebooks and docket books. Although he seems to have enjoyed some success, letters among him, Clarissa, and Julius Deming indicate the young couple needed to borrow $1,800 from Deming to purchase a residence. In 1826, Perkins decided to seek his fortune in Rochester, N.Y. He encountered success there, acquiring properties, collecting rents, and establishing a busy practice, eventually being admitted to the State Supreme Court of New York. A letterbook, daybook, and ledger provide details on his Rochester business dealings. He wrote letters in which he outlined his ambitious plans to relocate in New York City. Clarissa had frequent bouts of bad health leaving her in fragile condition, and she often remained in Litchfield with their children. During the time he was in Rochester, there was an active religious revival, and it had a great impact on Charles; in October, 1830, he wrote a seven-page letter expressing his new-found devotion. Although the letter itself is not in the papers, letters among Charles, Clarissa, and his sister Abigail document its content. The women were overjoyed with his conversion. In the 1830s, Perkins resettled in Litchfield, while still conducting business ventures in New York state. He and Clarissa Deming Perkins had eight children, three of whom lived to adulthood and are discussed below.

The papers contain a large number of letters to and from Abigail Perkins (1795-1875), who never married. She lived in Norwich through the 1820s, but frequently stayed in Rochester and Litchfield. After Charles returned to Litchfield in the 1830s, she settled there, too. The numerous letters between Abigail and her sister-in-law suggest they had a close relationship. Also of interest are the several diaries Abigail kept in the 1820s and 1830s.

Charles’ sister Harriet also took a sea voyage as a child; an 1807 diary describes a journey to Antigua. Also like Charles, Harriet underwent a religious conversion. Her papers illustrate her serious commitment to her faith. By her late teens, she was filling notebooks with passages of spiritual significance to her, and her diaries, which appear to be written almost compulsively, demonstrate her religious struggles. In her papers is the 1818 statement she prepared on the occasion of her conversion. She attended religious meetings and at least one revival, in Providence in 1820, but did not provide any details about them in her writings. Ironically, the Providence revival may have hastened her death; after she returned to Norwich, she complained of a persistent “cold” that worsened. She continued writing in her diary until just weeks before her death in 1821. Harriet’s last hours are chronicled in a lengthy account found in the papers of her sister Abigail.

The collection also contains the papers of Charles and Harriet’s sister Elizabeth Perkins (1776-1835), who married Capt. Solomon Ingraham and after his death, Capt. John Boswell (sometimes Buswell). The three siblings corresponded often, providing documentation of the family’s activities.

Charles Perkins and Clarissa Deming Perkins had three children who survived to adulthood: Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin (1824-1905), Julius Deming Perkins (1830-1911), and Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy (1832-1883). Their papers are an important part of the collection, but have not yet been processed.

Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin was married to James Mason Hoppin (1820-1906). He graduated from Yale in 1840 and Harvard Law School in 1842. After studying theology, he served as pastor of the Congregational church in Salem, Mass., from 1850 to 1859. He was later professor of art history at Yale and taught homiletics at Union Theological Seminary. He and Mary Deming Perkins had two children. After the deaths of Mary’s sister Lucretia and her husband in 1883, their children Mary Perkins Quincy and John W. Quincy Jr. resided with the Hoppins.

Julius Deming Perkins spent his early life in Litchfield. His career as an importer took him to New York City. He married Margaretta Dotterer and they returned to Litchfield. He was one of the incorporators and the first president of the Shepaug Valley Railroad. After fires in 1886 and 1888 destroyed many of Litchfield’s structures, Perkins funded the construction of a fire department. Perkins was active in politics and served on state boards. His wife and he had two children, Julius Deming Perkins Jr. and Edith Perkins. She married William Woodville Rockville.

Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy was married to John Williams Quincy (1813-1883), a descendant of the prominent Quincy family of Boston. For more about John William Quincy, see the description of Series 3, Quincy family, below. They had two children, Mary Perkins Quincy (1866-1921) and John W. Quincy Jr. (1868-1950).

Series 3. Quincy family (25.83 lin. ft.)

Almost all of the papers in this series consist of the papers of Mary Perkins Quincy (1866-1921), and includes her correspondence, materials regarding her domestic and international travels, genealogical records, and various items relating to her affiliations with the Daughters of the American Revolution, The Colonial Dames, and other memorial institutions. Her correspondences include letters from all corners of the globe, namely Prussia, Canada, Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Great Britain, Russia, France, Italy, Morocco, Greece and Egypt. Her correspondents included family, diplomats, and members of the royal families of several nations. Quincy had an especially active correspondence with her aunt, Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin. There is no correspondence to or from Quincy after 1913 although she did not die until 1921. A partial finding aid for her papers is available by clicking on the digital content link.

Mary Perkins Quincy was born in New York City to John Williams Quincy and Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy. Her father was a descendent of the prominent Quincy family of Boston, Mass. He entered business life as an iron merchant in New York, eventually becoming partner in the firm of Davenport and Quincy. He was married first to Katherine Feeks Allen with whom he had one child, Katherine Allen Quincy Trowbridge. After the death of his first wife, Quincy married Lucretia Perkins Deming in 1864. They had two children, Mary and John W. Quincy Jr. (1866-1950). In the late 1800s, an as-yet-to-determined condition required John Williams Jr. to spend the rest of his life under private institutional care.

After the death of their parents in 1883, Mary and John relocated from New York to New Haven to live with her mother’s sister Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin and her husband James Mason Hoppin. Mary Perkins Quincy also spent a large portion of her life in Litchfield with her uncle Julius Deming Perkins and his wife. In 1904, she had a home built in Litchfield called Ardley where she resided until her death in 1921.

Quincy spent the vast majority of her life pursuing her many passions, which included membership to memorial societies, genealogy, historic preservation, writing and travel. She was an active member of several historical societies, including the Litchfield Historical Society; ancestral groups such as the Colonial Dames of America, and the Daughters of the American Revolution; and art clubs like the Needle and Bobbin Club in Litchfield. She coauthored a privately published book entitled Pages of Azure and Gold with Sarah Gardiner.

The remainder of the series consists of several small collections of correspondence. Of interest are two Revolutionary War-era letters written by Qunicy’s great-great-grandfather Edmund Quincy to his daughters Katherine Quincy and Dorothy Quincy Hancock Scott.

Series 4. Other papers (0.21 lin. ft.)

All papers that cannot be specifically associated with either the Deming, Perkins, or Quincy family have been placed in Series 4, Other papers. Included are such items as third party correspondence, bills and receipts, land records, and publications. Of particular interest are 1801 emancipation documents for Candace, “a Negro servant girl,” and a printed broadside, presumably from 1775, of the petition of Continental Congress of October, 1774.

Biographical Note

Mary Perkins Quincy was born on January 13, 1866 in New York, New York to John Williams Quincy and Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy.  She lived in New York until the death of her parents in 1883, at which time she and her brother relocated to New Haven, Connecticut where they became the wards of their maternal aunt, Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin, and her husband James Mason Hoppin.  According to an obituary published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Quincy attended Miss Leverett’s School in New York and another school in New York kept by Mesdemoiselle Charbonnier of Paris, in addition to various tutors at home and abroad. 

Quincy spent a large portion of her life in Litchfield, Connecticut, where she had a home built in 1904 called Ardley.  She resided there until her death in 1921.  Litchfield was the seat of her maternal uncle Julius Deming Perkins and his wife, Margaretta Dotterer Perkins.  Litchfield was home to several generations of Quincy’s ancestors, including members of the Deming and Champion families. 

Quincy spent the vast majority of her life pursuing her many passions, which included membership to memorial societies, genealogy, historic preservation, writing and domestic and foreign travel.  She was an active member of several historical societies, including the Litchfield Historical Society; ancestral groups such as the Colonial Dames of America, and the Daughters of the American Revolution; and art clubs like the Needle and Bobbin Club in Litchfield.  She coauthored a privately published book entitled Pages of Azure and Gold with Sarah Gardiner.

Her correspondences include letters from all corners of the globe, namely Prussia, Canada, Switzerland, Austria-Hungary, Great Britain, Russia, France, Italy, Morocco, Greece and Egypt.  Her correspondents included family, diplomats, and members of the royal families of several nations.  Quincy had an especially active correspondence with her aunt, Mary Hoppin.

Subject/Index Terms

African Americans
African Americans - Connecticut - Litchfield
Business enterprises
Champion (N.Y.)
Champion, Henry, 1751-1836
Champion family
China - Commerce
Colchester (Conn.)
Deming, Julius, 1755-1838
Deming family
Great Britain - Commerce
Indentured servants
Lawyers - Connecticut - Litchfield
Litchfield (Conn.)
Merchants - Connecticut - Litchfield
Military pensions - United States - Revolution, 1775-1783
Norwich (Conn.)
Perkins family
Quincy, Mary Perkins
Quincy family
Revivals--United States
Rochester (N.Y.)
Second Great Awakening
Slavery
United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783
West Indies - Commerce

Administrative Information

Repository: Litchfield Historical Society

Accruals:

The first addition came in 1951 when Ardley, Quincy’s Litchfield home, was sold by the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England).  After the heirs to the Quincy estate removed the items they wished to have, and an antique dealer removed items for sale, Charlotte Wiggin, then Curator for the Litchfield Historical Society, removed from the attic papers and objects not desired by the other parties.  The majority of these papers was, at some point, put in archival folders and boxes and labeled “Mary Perkins Quincy Collection.”  Most of the folders were simply labeled “correspondence” while others appear to probably reflect the organization of Quincy herself, saying things such as “charming curiosities of Professor and Mrs. Hoppin.” 

The second addition came from Edith Howell Perkins Rockhill, a cousin of Mary Perkins Quincy and heir and executors to her estate.  In 1923, she donated an iron strong box said to have been owned by the Deming family.  In addition to portrait miniatures, currency, and jewelry, the strong box contained papers pertaining to the Champion and Deming families during the Revolution.  These papers are also among the portion of the collection previously cataloged as “Quincy Collection.”  They were added to the accession book in the 1950s, but the numbers were not written on the documents.

Finally, a former director of the Historical Society, William Warren, purchased a number of Deming-Perkins family papers from an antiques dealer.  He did this shortly after Ardley was sold.  Warren was an avid collector who sought items with specific Litchfield provenance.  There is no evidence that he sought out the materials that were sold from Ardley by the antique dealer, but it is entirely possible that these papers also came from the Quincy home.  The description of this portion of the collection is vague, but it does include records of people who were heavily represented in other parts of the collection.

Access Restrictions: The collection is open for research.

Acquisition Source: Mary Perkins Quincy

Acquisition Method: This collection was received in four major accessions, with several smaller additions.  The first came in 1921, with the death of Mary Perkins Quincy.  The materials which had been arranged by Quincy were accessioned as 1921-2-1 through 1921-02-15.  Included in this accession file is a document created by Quincy titled “Index to the Deming-Perkins Family Memorials, Quincy Collection.”  These documents were presumably kept at the Historical Society and thought to be part of this accession, though the actual items were not numbered.  These papers do not appear to have been kept together, as some of them were housed in uncataloged boxes labeled “Deming-Perkins Papers” while others appeared in the card catalog and were filed within four cataloged boxes labeled “Quincy Collection.”

Related Materials:

Architectural survey of the borough of Litchfield

Records of the Litchfield Needle and Bobbin Club

See also museum collections for objects of material culture

The Quincy Family Papers, of which Mary Perkins Quincy was a donor, are at the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Preferred Citation: Demings, Perkins, and Quincy families papers (1950-01-0), Litchfield Historical Society, Helga J. Ingraham Memorial Library, P.O. Box 385, 7 South Street, Litchfield, Connecticut, 06759

Other Note: This collection was processed with support from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), the Connecticut Humanities Council (CHC), and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: Deming family],
[Series 2: Perkins family],
[Series 3: Quincy family],
[Series 4: Other papers],
[All]

Series 2: Perkins familyAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 1: Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins IngrahamAdd to your cart.
Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham Boswell (1775-1835) was a daughter of Andrew Perkins and Anne Turner Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1813-1832Add to your cart.
Item 1: [M. H.?] to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, circa 1813 Apr 19Add to your cart.
Describes events related to Asahel Hooker's last evening; his religious pronouncements and admonitions; Jabez Huntington was present and Hooker wished Huntington to pray with him; Hooker wished to see his neighbors, Capt. Perkins particularly; Hooker expired the morning of the 19th.
Item 2: Shepherd, L. R. to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1832 Oct 11Add to your cart.
Reports the death of Maj. Dallaber.
Item 3: [?], Frances to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, late 1820s?Add to your cart.
Frances writes to her aunt to implore her, if she is seeking the saviour, and have not yet, that she would not be discouraged.
Folder 2: Commonplace book with figures of country dances, circa 1790sAdd to your cart.
Legend "Betsy Perkins" on first page; a notebook page in the hand of Harriet Perkins enclosed.
Folder 3: Receipt, E. Butt, painter, plumber, and glazier, to Capt. Ingraham, 1803 Jun 20Add to your cart.
Receipt is from London. Capt. Solomon Ingraham was Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham Boswell's first husband.
Sub-Series 2: Hoppin, James MasonAdd to your cart.

James Mason Hoppin (1820-1906) was the husband of Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin, a daughter of Charles Perkins and Clarissa Deming Perkins.

2 folders.

Folder 1: Correspondence, 1853-1902Add to your cart.
Item 1: Hoppin, James Mason to an unknown recipient, circa 1852Add to your cart.
A note of thanks is written to an unknown recipient on monogrammed note paper. Hoppin expresses a desire to make some little gift as an expression of respect and is grateful for continued and repeated kindness to his family.
Item 2: Hoppin, James Mason to Lucretia, 1853 Feb 11Add to your cart.
Written in Salem, Massachusetts, Hoppin expresses a sincere thank you for the gift of a Morse atlas as he is “entirely established and set up in the geography department” “which is indispensible.”  Mary feels remorse for the passing of her friend Elizabeth for she was a true friend and death cannot separate them.  Both Bennie and Fred were pleased with their gifts in the box and news of their development is shared as well.
Item 3: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1888 Jan 1Add to your cart.
A letter written in Berlin, Germany describing what Hoppin has seen of the city, museums and other sites he has visited, as well as how he feels about the city. He thinks Mary would approve. He attended a lecture on jurisprudence and even took his old seat.
Item 4: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1888 Jan 14Add to your cart.
A letter written in Berlin, Germany at the Hotel de Nord.  Mason describes his journey to Berlin from Dresden in a neat and pleasant car albeit it shaky. It kept him in constant motion from one side to the other but enjoyed the trip. The city has grown a lot since the last time he was there and the hotel is conveniently situated.  He describes the shops as very fine, attended the theater, walked about the city, and includes musings and other details of his day for Mary.
Item 5: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1888 Jan 18Add to your cart.
A letter written in Berlin, Germany on a piece of stationary from the Hotel Bellevue in Dresden, Hoppin writes to both Mary as well as Cousin James.  Also included is a short note on the same paper from a Marie de Waldenes. Discussed are various activities such as attending the opera to hear Carmen by French composer Bizet and wanting to go to the Hohenzollern Museum to view relics from Queen Louisa.
Item 6: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1888 Jan 26Add to your cart.
A letter written in Weimar, Germany at the Hotel Erbprinz, Hoppin writes to Mary that he was sorry to leave Berlin and hopes she had a comfortable journey “home”. Observations are made of the surroundings as well as the people he encountered.
Item 7: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1888 Jan 27Add to your cart.
Written on stationary from Rohrig’s Hotel in Eisenach Germany, Hoppin lets Mary know he is staying in the same room as Goethe who had it for a half year and a snow storm was encountered on the way to the hotel.  The performance of Hamlet Hoppin saw was exceptionally fine and there are three Oxford students who were reading German literature at the hotel.
Item 8: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1892 Jul 23 - 24Add to your cart.

The letter was written in Baddeck Nova Scotia, Canada to Mary with details on Jul 23rd about places that Hoppin has visited along with people he has met. He took a boat ride across the bay to visit Mr. Bell’s (even though he was not there) workshop and studio where an invention to use electricity to heat water as well as the telephone, an instrument to measure deafness, as well as others.  Hoppin shares observation on the scenery, landscape, and residents.

On July 24th, Hoppin went to the Presbyterian Church and heard Professor Pollock who presented an interesting sermon. Hoppin comments and describes Gaelic sermons as he had never heard the language spoken before where he could not detect some phrases or word or meaning.  He has been introduced to three members of parliament one of which was in his shirt sleeves.  He discusses his accommodations with the room having but one window by the bed and none of the comforts of their New Haven or Litchfield homes.

Item 9: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1897 Jan 8Add to your cart.
James tells Mary of the cold winter morning in New Haven and she must be enjoying the climate of Boston.  He hopes his upcoming book will be well received and available in Boston since it is a true art culture. He discusses other professors and their theories and philosophies.
Item 10: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1899 Mar 7Add to your cart.
Written in New Haven, Hoppin tells Mary he sent in his resignation of the Yale professorship which is to take place at the close of the college year. He has been connected with the school for 38 years as an instructor- a long stretch of service with the last year being satisfactory.  Aunt Mary has a bronchial cold and hopes she will be up again soon. The weather is mentioned (a small blizzard) as well as news of other family and friends.
Item 11: Hoppin, James Mason to Hoppin, Mary Deming Perkins, 1902 Sep 27Add to your cart.
Written in New Haven, Hoppin broke his left arm three weeks ago while going to see Mary’s lot of land on Prospect Street.  He stumbled over a protruding rock (he called it the Matterhorn) in the street and fell. Luckily Pastor Provost helped him up and they walked back to the house which his face looking like he had been in a fight. Hoppin thinks Mary’s letters are charmingly descriptive,  a pleasant and varied journey.
Item 12: Hoppin, James Mason to Perkins, Jr., Julius Deming, 1904 Dec 4Add to your cart.
A copy of a letter originally written in New Haven to Deming (Hoppin’s nephew) which praises the young man’s character,  actions, and speaks to life's challenges.  The copy was made on the back of a Aitken, Son & Co. of New York sale flyer.
Item 13Add to your cart.
Folder 2: MiscellaneousAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Childrens poem cards with cloth drawstring storage bag, 1823Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
Eleven poems for children with yellow and white cloth drawstring storage bag. Topics include On Spring, The Bee, The Bible, The Childs Evening Hymn, The Childs Morning Hymn, The Lily of the Valley, The Orphan, The Shepherd Boy, and Youthful Dedication.  The poems are printed on heavy card stock with hand colored pictures.
Item 2: Receipts, 1857 & 1870Add to your cart.
Two receipts with one being dated 1857 April 9 for Adams & Co. Package Express for one box to be transported from New York, New York to Salem, Massachusetts. Other receipt is dated 1870 May 13 for Steamer Continental with goods being sent from New York, New York to New Haven, Connecticut.
Item 3: Tour Guide and Diary for Europe, unknownAdd to your cart.
A handcrafted and written personal tour guide and book for France, Italy, Western Germany, Holland, Belgium, and Great Britain. Details include dates of arrival, places to see, stay, and eat at as well as all cities and towns visited. There is a color map of Turkey in Asia, Caucasia Provinces of Russia with an ad for John W. Quincy, 98 William Street, New York who is an agent for furnaces making anthracite and coal is included.
Folder 3: ReceiptsAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 3: Hoppin, Mary Deming PerkinsAdd to your cart.

Mary Deming Perkins Hoppin (1824-1905) was the wife of James Mason Hoppin and a daughter of Charles Perkins and Clarrisa Deming Perkins.

11 folders. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 4: Perkins, AbigailAdd to your cart.

Abigail Perkins (1795-1875) was a daughter of Andrew Perkins and Elizabeth Taylor Perkins and the sister-in-law of Clarissa Deming Perkins.

In addition to the papers listed below, there are 8 folders of papers created after 1840 that have not been processed.

Folder 1: Correspondence, 1821-1822Add to your cart.
Item 1: King, Mary O. to Perkins, Abigail, 1821 Jan 19Add to your cart.
Expresses to her cousin her sympathies regarding the low state of Harriet's health; news of family.
Item 2: Perkins, Abigail to King, Mary O., 1821 Oct 1Add to your cart.
News of family and friends; misses Harriet.
Item 3: Perkins, Abigail and Perkins, Charles to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1822 Apr 17Add to your cart.
Writes regarding news of family and friends; the Universalists' new church.
Item 4: King, Mary O. to Perkins, Abigail, 1822 Oct 26Add to your cart.
Writes to espress sympathies regarding the death of Perkins' father; news of family.
Item 5: Perkins, Abigail to [King, Mary O.?], 1822 Nov 19Add to your cart.
Writes to express concern for [King?]'s health; regrets she and others could not visit while her husband was alive; reflects on passing of near and dear friends, including her father; news of family.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1827-1828Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Abigail to King, Mary O., 1827 Mar 19Add to your cart.
Has been unsettled removing from one family to another; unsure of where she will remain; thinking of dividing her time between Norwich and Rochester; news of family and friends.
Item 2: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1827 Jun 15Add to your cart.
Describes here journey to Rochester by way of New York City and the Erie Canal; her impressions of Rochester; her plans uncertain.
Item 3: King, Seth to Perkins, Abigail, 1827 Sep 22Add to your cart.
Reports the death of the daughter of his sister Mary.
Item 4: Perkins, Abigail to King, Mary O., 1827 Oct 6Add to your cart.
Offers condolences for the loss of King's daughter Mary; unable to comply with King's request to spend the winter with her; reports the death of her brother's infant daughter.
Item 5: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1828 May 27Add to your cart.
News of family and friends; visit to Canandaigua; invites Boswell to visit.
Item 6: Perkins, Abigail to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1828 Aug 19Add to your cart.
Writes about Clarissa's health; Clarissa's children; Charles' business activities; news of friends and family; items purchased; her activities.
Item 7: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1828 Aug 20Add to your cart.
Writes about Clarissa's health; it has frustrated Charles' plans; she will never be able to return here; it is all unfortunate for him, but he is determined to make the best of it; news of family and friends.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1829-1830Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1829 Mar 12Add to your cart.
Reports on the weather; Clarissa's, Charles', and her plans to travel to Litchfield; the house they are living in; news of friends and family; speculates what Norwich is like; comments on the many marriages; exertions there to prevent boats running on the sabbath.
Item 2: Hooker, Faith F. to Perkins, Abigail, 1829Add to your cart.
Suggests that the writings of Abigail's sister Harriet on religion should be useful to the world in a memoir; asks what Abigail's feelings are on the subject of religion.
Item 3: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1829 Oct 13Add to your cart.
Comments on religious revival in Norwich; explains her delay in returning; health of Clarissa and Mary; Charles asks Capt. Boswell to make necessary repairs to Charles' house and send him the bill.
Item 4: Perkins, Abigail to Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1829 Dec 8Add to your cart.
Describes journey after they were separated in Newburgh; revival meetings in Norwich; news of family and friends; describes Norwich; a note for little Mary.
Item 5: [Stevens, D.?] to Perkins, Abigail, [circa 1829-1831]Add to your cart.
Writes from Rochester and discusses church affairs and their minister; an account published in The Craftsman; Perkins' uniting with the church.
Item 6: Perkins, Abigail to Perkins, Charles, 1830 Nov 16Add to your cart.
Describes her joy after reading Charles' letter to Clarissa professing his religious devotion; she thinks it best not to visit him in Rochester at that time.
Item 7: Perkins, Abigail to King, Mary O., 1830 Dec 17Add to your cart.
Describes religious awakening of her brother; quotes from his letter; he should now be in Litchfield; she will not be travelling due to the season.
Folder 4: Correspondence, 1831-1835Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Abigail to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1831 Mar 17Add to your cart.
Travelling is too bad at that time to return; family in Litchfield is well; enjoys their brother's religious conversion; discusses admittance to the church and religion; health of Mrs. Perkins.
Item 2: Perkins, Abigail to [King, Mary O.?], 1831 Jun 5Add to your cart.
Spent part of the winter and spring with her brother's family in Litchfield; her brother his much engaged in religion and thinks he never knew what happiness was before; he will probably leave Rochester as soon as he can complete his business, quite a sacrifice on his part; the revival in Rochester is on the decline; meeting of ministers in Litchfield; revival in Westfield.
Item 3: Perkins, Abigail to Murdock, Miss [?], [1833 Apr?]Add to your cart.
Draft of a letter in which Perkins wishes to espress to Miss Murdock the indignities Perkins felt on reading Miss Murdock's communication regarding their mutual friend Mr. James. On the reverse is a paragraph in Perkins' hand that begins "I have now publicly profess'd my faith in Christ."
Item 4: Perkins, Abigail to Dickinson, James T., 1835 JanAdd to your cart.
Writes regarding the death of an unidentified female and others; religious matters; inquires about articles the ladies are furnishing and making for him.
Item 5: Perkins, Abigail to Perkins, Charles and Perkins, Clarissa Deming, 1835 Feb 7Add to your cart.
Writes regarding the death of their sister, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham Boswell.
Item 6: Dickinson, James to Perkins, Abigail, 1835 Feb 23Add to your cart.
Last few weeks he has been confined to his room; offers condolences regarding her sister; undetermined when he will sail, two others are also going to southeastern Asia and they shall probably go in the same boat; discusses list of articles; his friends should not prepare them if they go against the grain of anyone.
Item 7: Morgan, Parmelia Taylor to Perkins, Abigail, 1835 Apr 7Add to your cart.
Writes to offer condolences regarding the death of Perkins' sister.
Folder 5: Correspondence, 1836-1838, [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Item 1: Dickinson, James T. to Perkins, Abigail, 1836 Dec 29Add to your cart.
Writes from Singapore regarding his and others' health; describes sights and sounds; Islamism; the house he is staying and its occupants; make-up of citizenry; his preaching.
Item 2: Perkins, Abigail to Dickinson, James T., 1838 May 10Add to your cart.
Writes of his and her health; describes a serious injury she received riding in a carriage; has left Norwich for Litchfield to be with her brother following the death of his wife; describes his family; her health is established and the Litchfield air is conducive to a restoration; news of friends; church in Litchfield.
Item 3: [?], Alicia to Perkins, Abigail, 1838 May 25Add to your cart.
Writes from Rochester regarding Perkins' brother leaving there; little William's death; their mutual friends Mr. and Mrs. James; the church; some indications of a revival; news of friends; misses Perkins; gave her pleasure to know that Perkins had made a profession of religion.
Item 4: Ripley, Eliza to Perkins, Abigail, 1838 Jul 13Add to your cart.
Introduces Alicia Blatchford, who will be going to Litchfield.
Item 5: Morgan, Parmelia Taylor to Perkins, Abigail, 1838 Dec 14Add to your cart.
News of family and friends; Angeline's death; Mr. Brace's preaching.
Item 6: Ford, Sarah A. to Perkins, Abigail, [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Wishes to address the state of their pastor's, Mr. James, pecuniary affairs by making a handsome New Year's present in money.
Folder 6: Account of the death of Harriet Perkins, 1821Add to your cart.
Folder 7: Copy of Charles Perkins to Clarissa Deming Perkins Oct. 28, 1830 letter, 1830Add to your cart.
Contains a copy of the letter in which he declares his religious conversion and writings and extracts relating to religious belief.
Folder 8: Copy of Joseph Johnson to Samson Occam Oct. 1, 1773 letter, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 9: Diary, 1819-1837Add to your cart.
Folder 10: Diary, 1834Add to your cart.
Folder 11: Extract from William James' sermon, 1829 May 3Add to your cart.
Folder 12: Handwriting exercise and award, 1810Add to your cart.
Folder 13: Invitation to Yale Commencement ball, 1813Add to your cart.
Folder 14: Notebook, [1820s?]Add to your cart.
Notebook which contains tangram designs and a printed sheet illustrating sign language.
Folder 15: Sermons copied after the deaths of Elizabeth Taylor Perkins and Harriet Perkins, 1819, 1821Add to your cart.
Folder 16: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 17: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 18: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 19: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 20: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 21: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 22: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 23: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 24: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 5: Perkins, Andrew (1743-1822)Add to your cart.
Andrew Perkins (1743-1822) was married three times. Among his children were Andrew Perkins Jr. and Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham Boswell with his first wife Anne Turner and Charles Perkins, Harriet Perkins, Abigail Perkins, and Edward Perkins with his third wife Elizabeth Taylor Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1787-1795Add to your cart.
Item 1: Griswold, Roger to Perkins, Andrew, 1787 May 20Add to your cart.
Writes regarding payment for a deed for a house Perkins bought from Apthorp.
Item 2: Hillhouse, James to Perkins, Andrew, 1789 Sep 10Add to your cart.
Writes that he has not yet seen Apthorp; has has sent him on money; can give no information on Apthorp's necessity for money.
Item 3: Perkins, Andrew to [Perkins, Andrew, Jr.], 1795 Jul 15Add to your cart.
News of family; advice about going out on the schooner; has paid off some of Jr.'s notes; news he has heard from Barbados; Capt. Cook; offers advice about staying well in the West Indies.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1804-1812Add to your cart.
Item 1: Gracie, Archibald to Perkins, Andrew, 1804 May 7Add to your cart.
Encloses letters and copies of letters from Capt. Ingraham; reports that Capt. Ingraham's ship requires repair and he cannot be expected there for some time.
Item 2: Perkins, Andrew to Perkins, Edward, 1810 Aug 13Add to your cart.
News of family and friends; his recent travels in Connecticut.
Item 3: Perkins, Andrew to Smith, Francis, 1810 Dec 14Add to your cart.
Gives instructions regarding selling apples in Demarra and purchasing goods with the proceeds.
Item 4: [?] to "sister", 1812 Mar 12Add to your cart.
News of family; Harriet received a letter from Charles describing a great disturbance at Yale; reports on a letter from papa's brother in Demarara about a seized vessel. On reverse of the letter is a note from Andrew Perkins regarding Mr. Huntington, Esq. Clark and some money.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1819-1820Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Andrew to Taylor, Samuel, 1819 Jul 26Add to your cart.
Writes after the death of his wife and Taylor's sister with news of family; would like to hear from friends and Westfield; since he has not, he fears they do not want to hear from him; reflects on the death of his wife.
Item 2: Taylor, Samuel to Perkins, Andrew, 1819 Aug 27Add to your cart.
Offers condolences regarding the death of his sister and Perkins wife; news of family.
Item 3: Perkins, Andrew to Taylor, Samuel, 1820 Jun 5Add to your cart.
Writes that he is grateful for Taylor's letter; it was the only one he received from any of Taylor's dear sister's connections in Westfield; news of family; would like to hear from his brothers and sisters in Westfield; would like them to visit.
Item 4: Perkins, Andrew to Taylor, Jedediah, 1820 Jul 29Add to your cart.
Writes that he is very happy to receive Taylor's letter; discusses death of Taylor's brother Samuel; thinking of visiting Westfield in September with one of his daughters for company; Harriet has been in Providence for 5 weeks, now has a cold and fever; news of family and friends; would be gratified to receive a visit from any of their connections in Westfield.
Folder 4: Correspondence, 1821-1822Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Andrew to King, Mary O., 1821 Jul 28Add to your cart.
Describes their journey from Westfield; expresses his entire satisfaction in his visit; asks that she excuses his want of matter to make his letter agreeable to the female sex as he has not been accustomed to address ladies by letter; news of family.
Item 2: Perkins, Andrew to Morgan, Archippus, 1821 Jul 28Add to your cart.
Expresses his entire satisfaction at the very kind treatment he experienced when at Morgan's house; describes his journey to Norwich; news of family.
Item 3: Perkins, Andrew to Morgan, Archippus, 1821 Aug 22Add to your cart.
Expresses gratitude for the visit of Morgan's daughter; invites Morgan and his wife to Norwich.
Item 4: Perkins, Andrew to King, Mary O., 1821 Sep 17Add to your cart.
Reports on recent visits from family members; inquires of her about family.
Item 5: Perkins, Andrew to Taylor, Jedediah, 1821 Oct 1Add to your cart.
Expresses disappointment in not seeing Taylor when he was visiting Westfield last year; had a very agreeable visit there; describes visitors he has had.
Item 6: Perkins, Andrew to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1822 Aug 22Add to your cart.
Pleased that her health is better; many deaths among children in that place with the dysentery; news of family and friends.
Folder 5: Appointment to a committee to look into affairs that will concern the town in making the now proposed division of the township, 1789 May 1Add to your cart.
Folder 6: Brigantine Pierre papers, 1772Add to your cart.
Customs paper and let-pass issued by officials of Martinique. In French.
Folder 7: Sloop Olive papers, 1768 Dec 17Add to your cart.
Let-pass issued by Ulysses FitzMaurice in St. George and receipt for 10 shillings 6 pence for the use of Greenwich Hospital by John Miller, receiver for the ports of New London.
Item 1: Account book, 1763-1769Add to your cart.
Documents trade dealings, often involving the sloop Olive, in Liverpool, England, and the West Indies. An entry and a tipped-in account from 1769 indicates a transaction involving "2 Negroes." Currently stored in 3B Box 25..
Item 2: Log book of brigantine Marquis de Lafayette, 1782-1783Add to your cart.
Log book of two voyages, Elisha Hinman, Commander: voyage to the West Indies, commenced Oct. 10, 1872; voyage to Virginia and then Amsterdam, commenced Feb. 11, 1783. Currently stored in aisle 17B.
Sub-Series 6: Perkins, Andrew, Jr. (1774-1796)Add to your cart.
Andrew Perkins Jr. (1774-1796) was a son of Andrew Perkins and Anne Turner Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1789, 1795Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Andrew, Jr. to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1789 Sep 6Add to your cart.
Writes about his health, pineapple sent by Mama.
Item 2: Perkins, Andrew, Jr. to Perkins, Andrew, 1795 Jul 24Add to your cart.
Discusses Capt. Cook and payment of the dollar; other financial matters; speculation and insurance; has taken commissions; citizens in New York are much dissatisfied with the treaty; news of friends; lists goods received from Capt. Cook; the schooner is ready for sea; purchased a coop of ducks with Capt. Cook which he thinks will pay a profit.
Sub-Series 7: Perkins, CharlesAdd to your cart.

Charles Perkins (1792-1856) was the husband of Clarissa Deming Perkins and a son of Andrew Perkins and Elizabeth Taylor Perkins.

Oversize items are listed after the folder listing. In addition to the papers listed below, there are 14 folders of papers created after 1840 that have not been processed.

Folder 1: Correspondence, [1810?]-1829Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Edward, [1810?]Add to your cart.
Reports that mother will send up Edward's shirts next Wednesday. Written on a declamation on the subject of France during the American Revolutionary War written in the hand of Harriet Perkins, marked "Colchester Sepr. 6th 1809." The declamation is also marked "Plainfield October 10th 1810."
Item 2: Perkins, Charles to Deming, Julius, 1818 Feb 19Add to your cart.
With the benefit of Deming's advice, they have concluded to purchase the house in which they are residing.
Item 3: Perkins, Charles to Deming, Julius, 1818 Mar 6Add to your cart.
Acknowledges receipt of Deming's letter; order in the amount of $1,840 was deposited, there to remain until the delivery of the deed.
Item 4: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1826 May 30Add to your cart.
Describes the advantages of Rochester to Burlington; his business; expects to visit Norwich in July; investing in the Rochester bank.
Item 5: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1826 Jul 15Add to your cart.
Busy with business and friends visiting from New England; thinks Abigail will like Rochester; describes activities there; his upcoming cases; they have about as much business as they can do themselves.
Item 6: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Mary Deming, 1829 Dec 23Add to your cart.
Her papa has not forgotten her and will see her next spring at Litchfield.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1830Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1830 Jan 13Add to your cart.
Describes his office; news of family; furniture he sent from Rochester for Mrs. P.; will probably not visit Connecticut until May or April; describes Rochester; feelings about his situation.
Item 2: Perkins, Charles to Deming, Mary, 1830Add to your cart.
Glad to hear she has been a good girl; remembers her; looks at her portrait; will see her in spring.
Item 3: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1830 Sep 13Add to your cart.
Spent 7 weeks in Litchfield; visited in New York for possible future calculations; since his return, he has been gratified at his prospects; his rents have been good; discusses his future plans; he may appear to the world to be a gentleman of ease and leisure; he is in fact and in earnest a hard working and contriving man spending nothing but what is truly necessary.
Item 4: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, [circa 1830]Add to your cart.
Glad to hear of the revival in Norwich; discusses faith; churches are reviving in Rochester.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1831-[1835?]Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Charles and Perkins, Clarissa Deming to Perkins, Abigail, 1831 Dec 24Add to your cart.
Charles discusses health of family; proposes Abigail come to Litchfield; recents deaths in the family; this world now has but one thing of magnitude in his thoughts, that is, to make his calling and election sure; encloses $20; encourages Abigail to buy wood and enjoy a fire; he will provide whatever she needs to be comfortable; Clarissa offers sympathy for the difficult times through which Abigail and sister Boswell are passing; news of family; discusses church.
Item 2: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1832 Jan 19Add to your cart.
He will leave to see her without Clarissa next Monday or Tuesday; discusses scriptures he has read; sermons in chuch there; fears the Asiatic pestilence will visit our shores this coming year.
Item 3: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1834 Nov 5Add to your cart.
Expresses his sympathy regarding the death of Alfred E. Perkins
Item 4: Bacon, Asa to Perkins, Charles and Perkins, Clarissa Deming, [1835?]Add to your cart.
Declines and invitation to tea.
Folder 4: Correspondence, 1837-1839, [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1837 Jan 24Add to your cart.
Reports the death of his son Charles William.
Item 2: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1837 Jul 24Add to your cart.
Health of Mrs. Perkins; her treatments; has to contemplate the possibility that she will not live a great while; glad to have her come to visit; news of friends and family.
Item 3: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1837 Aug 7Add to your cart.
Reports the death of his wife; he will now look to Abigail to oversee the household, advise the children, and help him rear them; discusses her travel arrangements; Jane, the girl he brought from Rochester, takes care of children and household chores.
Item 4: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Julius Deming, 1838 Apr 5Add to your cart.
Writes about springtime and offers instructions on staying healthy, saying his prayers, being kind, and keeping the sabbath day holy.
Item 5: Perkins, Charles to Perkins, Abigail, 1839 Sep 25Add to your cart.
His daughter Mary should see what a great privilege it is to attend her school; does not know when he will return; Mary's return to school; news of friends; Abigail's finances.
Item 6: Gould, James to Perkins, Charles, [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Wishes Perkins to call on him.
Item 7: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Perkins, Charles, [1830s?]Add to your cart.
Would like Perkins to take charge of the letters for Mr. Cushman etc.
Folder 5: Business papers, 1827-1840Add to your cart.
Folder 6: Deeds, 1834-1835Add to your cart.
One deed for property in Rochester, N.Y., one for property in Ashtabula, Ohio.
Folder 7: Handwriting exercise, 1805 Dec 9Add to your cart.
Folder 8: Invitations, [1810s?]Add to your cart.
Folder 9: Journal of a voyage from Norwich to Sandwich Bay on the north coast of America in the year 1807, 1807Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
Folder 10: Law practice, attorney license, Supreme Court of the State of New York, 1828 OctAdd to your cart.
Folder 11: Law practice, case accounts and meterological notebook, 1815-1828Add to your cart.
Folder 12: Law practice, certificate, admission as a counsellor in the Court of Chancery in the State of New York, 1826 Mar 20Add to your cart.
Folder 13: Law practice, certificate, admission as an attorney and counsellor of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1846 Feb 6Add to your cart.
Folder 14: Law practice, docket book, 1816-1825Add to your cart.
Folder 15: Law practice, notebook, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 16: Mortgage, 1833 Jan 10Add to your cart.
Charles and Clarissa Deming Perkins to Abigail Perkins.
Folder 17: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 18: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 19: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 20: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 21: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 22: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 23: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 24: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 25: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 26: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 27: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 28: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 29: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Folder 30: UnprocessedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Daybook and register, 1816-1826Add to your cart.
Currently stored in 3B Box 25.
Item 2: Letter book, Pomeroy & Perkins, 1826-1828Add to your cart.

Copies of letters written in Rochester, N.Y., in connection with the land business.

Currently housed in 3A Box 29.

Item 3: Letter book, 1826-1830Add to your cart.

Records of land and land transactions in Rochester, N.Y.

Currently housed in 3A Box 29.

Item 4: Daybook and ledger, 1837-1851Add to your cart.
Includes diagram of the Perkins cemetery plot. Currently stored in 3B Box 25.
Item 5: Schedule of debts, 1844-1851Add to your cart.

Title page inscribed with "Schedule of all debts owing by me this day March 28, 1844, with int. all paid up, as expressed ...  containing also a brief statement of my relations of business with the late Maj. Joseph Perkins and also John A. Rockwell, Esq., as to some lands in the State of Ohio, now about ended as to both."

Currently stored in 3B Box 25.

Sub-Series 8: Perkins, EdwardAdd to your cart.
Edward Perkins (1796-1812) was a son of Andrew Perkins and Elizabeth Taylor Perkins.
Folder 1: Geography schoolwork, 1812 Apr 1Add to your cart.
Item 1: Arithmetic notebook, 1809-1810Add to your cart.
Later used as a scrapbook with clippings pasted over some of the mathematics lessons. Paper embroidery of a floral arrangement tipped in. Currently stored in 3B Box 25.
Sub-Series 9: Perkins, ElishaAdd to your cart.
Elisha Perkins (1741-1799) was a brother of Andrew Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Perkins, Elisha to Perkins, Andrew, 1762 Sep 20Add to your cart.
He would be glad to see Andrew at Plainfield.
Sub-Series 10: Perkins, Elizabeth TaylorAdd to your cart.
Elizabeth Taylor Perkins (1761-1819) was the wife of Andrew Perkins and a daughter of Eldad Taylor and Thankful Day Taylor.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Perkins, Elizabeth Taylor to Taylor, Thankful Day, 1802 Jan 20Add to your cart.
Copy of a letter in which Elizabeth writes about religion.
Sub-Series 11: Perkins, HarrietAdd to your cart.
Harriet Perkins (1793-1821) was a daughter of Andrew Perkins and Elizabeth Taylor Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, 1818Add to your cart.
Item 1: Perkins, Harriet to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1818 May 3Add to your cart.
Writes about Elizabeth's health and the benefit of the spa; news of family, friends, and visitors.
Item 2: Perkins, Harriet to King, John, Mrs., 1818 Nov 23Add to your cart.
Writes about health of her mother and of Mrs. King; her happiness found in her religion; news of family and friends.
Folder 2: Correspondence, 1819Add to your cart.
Item 1: King, Mary O. to Perkins, Harriet, 1819 May 8Add to your cart.
Reports the death of her mother; news of family and friends.
Item 2: King, Mary O. to Perkins, Harriet, 1819 Jul 26Add to your cart.
Expresses sympathy regarding the death of Harriet's mother; has been visiting with her Stratford friends in hopes that the change of air will prove beneficial to her health; news of family.
Item 3: Perkins, Harriet; Perkins, Andrew; and Perkins, Charles to Boswell, Elizabeth Perkins Ingraham, 1819 Nov 25Add to your cart.
News of friends and family; they miss Elizabeth.
Folder 3: Correspondence, 1820, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Baldwin, Emily to Perkins, Harriet, 1820 Jan 6Add to your cart.
Has settled in housekeeping; has not heard of any news of Harriet's family since she last saw her; explains that this sabbath is important to all the Christians in New Haven; discusses religion.
Item 2: Perkins, Harriet to King, John, Mrs., 1820 Feb 21Add to your cart.
Writes about health of family; religion; death of her mother; her father would like to hear from friends in Westfield; news of friends.
Item 3: Perkins, Harriet to King, John, Mrs., 1820 Feb 21Add to your cart.
Copy of Perkins' Feb. 21, 1820, letter.
Item 4: Perkins, Harriet to Baldwin, Emily, undatedAdd to your cart.
Writes about health of her sister; news of family.
Folder 4: A catalogue of the young ladies who are members of the historical society, 1813Add to your cart.
Folder 5: Commonplace book, [1810s-1820s?]Add to your cart.
Folder 6: Commonplace book, [1810s-1820s?]Add to your cart.
Folder 7: Diary, 1807Add to your cart.
Kept while on board the brigantine Jane on a voyage to Antiqua.
Folder 8: Diary, 1812-1814Add to your cart.
Folder 9: Diary, 1813-1818Add to your cart.
Folder 10: Diary, 1818-1820Add to your cart.
Folder 11: Diary, 1820-1821Add to your cart.
Folder 12: Good texts of scripture, 1813Add to your cart.
Folder 13: Invitation, [1809?]Add to your cart.
Folder 14: School papers, 1809-1810, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 15: Statement regarding a covenant transaction with God, 1818 Aug 27Add to your cart.
Folder 16: Will, [1821?]Add to your cart.
Folder 17: Miscellaneous, undatedAdd to your cart.
A verse written on the reverse of a note regarding the death of Harriet Perkins' mother and a copy of a letter published in early nineteenth century journals under the heading "Secret Correspondence," which begins, "I cannot be satisfied my dearest friend"; the letter is signed Caroline and addressed to Miss Mary De Hautville, Paris, and appears to be in the hand of Harriet Perkins.
Sub-Series 12: Perkins, JosephAdd to your cart.
Joseph Perkins (1704-1794) was the father of Andrew Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Perkins, Joseph to Perkins, Andrew, 1768 Mar 28Add to your cart.
Intended to have given Andrew a visit before his departure, but now thinks it not probable; he informs Andrew of his his concern and wishes for him; offers his admonitions.
Folder 2: Correspondence, Perkins, Joseph to [Perkins, Simeon?], [1768?]Add to your cart.
He did not improve the last opportunity he had to give a father's advice, but will improve this, which may be the last I ay ever have; offers his admonitions. Reverse has a Nov. 29, 1768, letter written by Andrew Perkins to his brother regarding exchange of some goods.
Sub-Series 13: Perkins, Julius DemingAdd to your cart.

Julius Deming Perkins (1830-1911) was a son of Charles Perkins and Clarissa Deming Perkins and a grandson of Julius Deming and Dorothy Champion Deming.

Account book at The Glebe, 1854-1867 housed in 3B Box 25.

Folder of advertisements and correspondence concerning the Shepaug Valley Railroad.

15 folders, 1 account book, and 1 diary. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 14: Quincy, Lucretia Deming PerkinsAdd to your cart.

Lucretia Deming Perkins Quincy (1832-1883) was the wife of John Williams Quincy (1813-1883) and a daughter of Charles Perkins and Clarissa Deming Perkins.

7 folders and 1 account book. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 15: Rockhill, Edith PerkinsAdd to your cart.

Edith Perkins Rockhill (1870-1946) was wife of William Woodville Rockhill and the daughter of Julius Deming Perkins and Margaretta Dotterer Perkins.

Letterbook ca. 1900-1908 currently housed in 3A Box 29.

2 folders. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 16: Rockhill, William WoodvilleAdd to your cart.

William Woodville Rockhill (1854-1914) was the husband of Edith Perkins Rockhill.

Scrapbook ca. 1900 housed in 3A Box 29.

Scrapbook 1905-1907 housed in 3A Box 29.

1 folder. Unprocessed.

Sub-Series 17: Taylor, EldadAdd to your cart.
Eldad Taylor ( 1708-1777) was the father of Elizabeth Taylor Perkins, wife of Andrew Perkins.
Folder 1: Correspondence, Taylor, Eldad to Taylor, Thankful Day, 1776 Nov 11Add to your cart.
Describes his journey and his health; items he purchased; news from Boston regarding American Revolutionay War incidents; militia; Gen. Howe has laid another hellish plot to destroy them, but it was discovered.
Sub-Series 18: Taylor, JohnAdd to your cart.
John Taylor (1762-1843) was a son of Eldad Taylor and a brother-in-law of Andrew Perkins.
Folder 1: Papers, 1783, 1803, undatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Taylor, John to Taylor, Eldad and Taylor, Thankful Day, 1783 Jun 25Add to your cart.
Writes from Yale about religion.
Item 2: Correspondence, Taylor, John to Perkins, Elizabeth Taylor, 1803 Oct 16Add to your cart.
Writes about the death of their mother and brother; health of his family.
Item 3: Bookplate, Rev. John Taylor, undatedAdd to your cart.
Sub-Series 19: Other Perkins family papersAdd to your cart.
Folder 1: Biography of the family of Joseph and Jabez Perkins, undatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 2: Bills and receipts, Mr. Perkins, 1847-1849Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 20: PhotographsAdd to your cart.
1 folder; daguerreotypes. Unprocessed.

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[Series 1: Deming family],
[Series 2: Perkins family],
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