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Adams family collection

Overview

Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Administrative Information

Detailed Description

Correspondence

Other papers

Photographs

Albums



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Adams family collection, 1798-1928 | Litchfield Historical Society

By Leith Johnson and Stephen Powell

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Collection Overview

Title: Adams family collection, 1798-1928Add to your cart.

Predominant Dates:1798-1877

Primary Creator: Adams, Charles (1805-1883)

Other Creators: Adams, Charles, Jr. (1845-1864), Adams, Joseph (1764-1856), Wessells, Julia Adams How (1842-1904), Wheelock, Mary Adams (1838-1895)

Extent: 2.0 Boxes

Arrangement:

The collection is arranged in four series:

1. Correspondence

2. Other papers

3. Photographs

4. Albums

Date Acquired: 06/01/1970

Subjects: Adams family, Litchfield (Conn.), United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865, United States--Politics and government--1783-1865, United States--Social life and customs--1783-1865

Forms of Material: Autograph albums, Business records, Correspondence, Photographs

Languages: English

Scope and Contents of the Materials

The personal papers of the Adams Family, including Joseph Adams (1767-1856); his son, Charles Adams (1805-1883); children of Charles Adams, including Julia Adams How Wessells (1842-1904), Mary Adams Wheelock (1838-1895), and Charles Adams Jr. (1845-1864); other family members; and friends and business associates. The collection consists primarily of correspondence.

The collection consists primarily of correspondence received by Joseph Adams from family members and members of the Litchfield community with legal or other matters involving him and correspondence among the immediate members of the family of Charles Adams, in particular, two daughters of Charles Adams, Mary Adams Wheelock and Julia Adams How Wessells. The correspondence is mostly personal in nature, relating to family news and concerned with matters of health, births, deaths, and visits. This was a traveling family, all generations, so there is an occasional glimpse glimpse of the trials of stage and canal travel. There is a pervasive religious awareness in the letters, perhaps most expressed by Charles to his father in the 1820s. Unfortunately, there is nothing in the collection related to the early career of Joseph Adams as a cabinet maker nor of publishing activities of Henry Adams and Charles Adams in Litchfield.

Although domestic topics predominate in the letters, correspondents sometimes address local or national topics of interest. Joseph's correspondence includes letters from or news about two men who were at one time or another leading business figures in Boston: Amos Lawrence (1786-1852), who was married to Joseph's niece, and Giles Richards (1754-1829), who was Joseph's brother-in-law. For example, Lawrence's 1845 Feb 1 letter offers a personal philosophical expression of a wealthy and successful merchant. Letters from members of the family who moved to the South, particularly from Amos Adams (who owned a plantation and slaves), have a few references to business conditions. A nephew of Joseph Adams, Henry Adams Bullard, wrote twice (1832-1833) to Joseph from Washington when he was a Congressman. Benjamin Tallmadge (1754-1835), another Congressman, wrote Joseph five letters (1814-1826) from Washington, where he was acting for Joseph in financial matters. Four of the letters written while Tallmadge was serving in the House of Representatives.

Some of the papers relate to the Civil War. Charles Adams (1845-1864), the son of Charles and Julia Hinman Adams, enlisted in the 19th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers in 1862 following the outbreak of the Civil War. On June 11, 1864, he died of wounds received on June 1 during the Battle of Cold Harbor. During the war, Adams regularly wrote letters to his parents and sisters. He recorded his thoughts about Generals McClellan, Burnside, and Grant, and President Lincoln; life in camp (maintaining and outfitting tents, sleeping arrangements, food, prayer meetings, entertainments and lectures, snowball battles); support for the Emancipation Proclamation; his belief in the cause; postings, guard duty, inspections, and drills; encouraging enlistment; speculation about duration of war and upcoming military activities; his cousin, Charles Hinman Graves, and other relatives he sees; the 40th N.Y. and Bull Run; African-American dock and government stores workers; guarding “contrabands” (freed or former slaves) from Virginia and Maryland; news of other Litchfield residents; politics in Connecticut; and the weather. The collection contains letters written relative to his death by Representative John H. Hubbard and Marie Barton Greene, who served with the Sanitary Commission. Charles Adams Jr. is not the only Adams family member serving in the Civil War to be documented in the collection; correspondence from Anna Adams (1814-1906) relates to the death of her brother Joseph Henry Adams (1843-1861) during battle on Santa Rosa Island, Fla.

Collection Historical Note

Adams family members were descendants of Henry Adams of Braintree and distant cousins of the famous Adams family of Massachusetts. Joseph Adams was a fourth cousin of President John Quincy Adams. Living contemporaneously in Litchfield was the family of Judge Andrew Adams (1736-1797), which descended from Samuel Adams of Stratford, Conn., and not related to the family of Joseph Adams.

Joseph Adams moved to Litchfield from Roxbury, Mass., in 1790 and established himself as a cabinet maker. With advertisements in issues of the Litchfield Monitor for June 1790 he introduced himself to Litchfield residents as a cabinet maker from Boston and solicited their business. He advertised frequently in the 1790s for apprentices, but sold his shop in 1802. He was Litchfield borough clerk, 1818-1823 and 1824-1838 and borough president 1839-1842. He also served as constable for six years, lister or rate-maker (functioning as assessor) for twelve years, grand juror for six years, a director of the Litchfield Savings Bank, and a surveyor. He married Deborah Marsh in 1792 and they had eight children.

Two of the children, Henry Adams (1794-1842) and Charles Adams (1805-1883), established themselves in the newspaper business. The early interest of Joseph in journalism is evidenced in a letter he received from his nephew, Charles Chauncey Adams (1788-1814)  in 1807, in which he acknowledges information regarding the status of newspapers published in Litchfield. After working in Huntsville, Ala., in the 1820s, where he was associated with newspapers there, Henry Adams purchased the Litchfield County Post in 1829, changing the title to The Litchfield Enquirer with his first issue, January 29, 1829. He continued to publish the newspaper until his death by accidental drowning in 1842.

In the early 1820s, Charles Adams moved to New Haven and apprenticed with the printer Thomas Collier, formerly of Litchfield, and worked in the office of Sherman Converse. Adams established a printing business in 1825 and published The New Haven Chronicle in 1827 and then founded the New Haven Palladium in 1829. In the early 1830s, he moved to Bath, N.Y., where he published The Constitutionalist beginning in 1834. He also published the Corning and Blossburg Advocate. When his brother Henry died unexpectedly in 1842, Adams returned to Litchfield and continued publication of The Litchfield Enquirer until 1845, when it was sold to Payne Kilbourne. Twice Adams assumed editorship of the paper until it was sold to James Humphrey in 1859. After 1845, Adams was elected judge of probate court, a position he held for fourteen of the next twenty years. He was a deacon of the Congregational Church; a director of the Litchfield Savings Bank, the Litchfield Female Academy, and the Litchfield County Historical and Antiquarian Society, and a member of the Board of Visitors of the Elm Park Collegiate Institute.

With the exceptions of Henry Adams and Charles Adams (who returned from Bath, N.Y.), all of the children of Joseph and Deborah Marsh Adams left Litchfield: Sarah Adams Peck (1792-1877) to Bristol, Conn.; Betsey Adams May (1796-1877) to Bath, N.Y.; Amos Adams (1798-1859) to Baton Rouge, La.; John Marsh Adams (1801-1853) to Augusta, Ga.; Kezia Adams Rogers (1811-1899) to Buffalo; and Thomas William (1814-1848), to Augusta, Ga.

Biographical Note

Charles Adams (1805-1883) was a son of Litchfield residents Joseph Adams (1764-1856) and Deborah Marsh Adams (1773-1857). In the early 1820s, Charles Adams moved to New Haven and apprenticed with the printer Thomas Collier, formerly of Litchfield, and worked in the office of Sherman Converse. Adams established a printing business in 1825 and published The New Haven Chronicle in 1827 and then founded the New Haven Palladium in 1829. In the early 1830s, he moved to Bath, N.Y., where he published The Constitutionalist beginning in 1834. He also published the Corning and Blossburg Advocate. When his brother Henry died unexpectedly in 1842, Adams moved back to Litchfield and continued publication of The Litchfield Enquirer until 1845, when it was sold to Payne Kilbourne. Twice Adams assumed the editorship of the paper until it was sold to James Humphrey in 1859. After 1845, Adams was elected judge of probate court, a position he held for fourteen of the next twenty years. He was a deacon of the Congregational Church; a director of the Litchfield Savings Bank, the Litchfield Female Academy, and the Litchfield County Historical and Antiquarian Society, and a member of the Board of Visitors of the Elm Park Collegiate Institute. He married Jane Hinman of New Haven in 1827. She died in 1828. He married Julia Hinman of New Haven in 1830 and they had ten children.

Subject/Index Terms

Adams family
Litchfield (Conn.)
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
United States--Politics and government--1783-1865
United States--Social life and customs--1783-1865

Administrative Information

Repository: Litchfield Historical Society

Access Restrictions: The collection is open for research.

Use Restrictions: Unpublished materials authored or otherwise produced by the creator(s) of this collection are in the public domain. There are no restrictions on use. Copyright status for other collection materials is unknown. Transmission or reproduction of materials protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.) beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of copyright holders. Works not in the public domain cannot be commercially exploited without permission of the copyright holders. Responsibility for any use rests with the user.

Acquisition Source: Margaret and Dorothy Baldwin

Acquisition Method: The bulk of the collection (1970-35-1) was donated in 1970 (by Margaret and Dorothy Baldwin, great-granddaughters of Joseph Adams (1767-1856) and Deborah Marsh Adams (1773-1857). Three autograph albums (1974-42-29, 1974-42-30, 1974-42-31) were a gift of George Baldwin in 1974. A photograph album is presumed to be part of the same gift.

Separated Materials: Four silhouettes cut from paper (two portraits on one sheet and two on two separate sheets) have been removed from the Adams Family Collection and added to the museum collections.

Original/Copies Note: Transcriptions are available for some documents. For more information please see http://www.litchfieldhistoricalsociety.org.

Related Materials:

Adams family collection (2010-119-0)

Photographs of some Adams family are in Photographs, Portraits: Adams and Baldwin files.

Louisiana State University Libraries, Special Collections. Freemasons St. James Lodge No. 47 (Baton Rouge, La.) records (Mss 2860).

Massachusetts Historical Society

Amos Lawrence Papers.

Preferred Citation: Adams family papers (1970-35-1), Litchfield Historical Society, Helga J. Ingraham Memorial Library, P.O. Box 385, 7 South Street, Litchfield, Connecticut, 06759.

Finding Aid Revision History: The collection was processed and initial finding aid created in 1978 by Stephen Powell. Revision of processing and finding aid in 2009 by Leith Johnson.

Other Note: This collection was processed with support from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR).


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: Correspondence],
[Series 2: Other papers],
[Series 3: Photographs],
[Series 4: Albums],
[All]

Series 1: CorrespondenceAdd to your cart.
Correspondence is arranged alphabetically by creator, except for correspondence sent to an Adams family member by a person outside the Adams family, which has been placed in the sub-series for that family member. Item descriptions note major topics of discussion.
Sub-Series 1: Abbot, J. B.Add to your cart.
Folder 1: Abbott, J. B., 1864 Jun 11Add to your cart.
Letter to J. H. Hubbard reporting that Charles Adams (1845-1864) has been wounded during the Civil War in battle and is "in a dying condition."
Sub-Series 2: Adams, Amos (1798-1859)Add to your cart.
Amos Adams was born in Litchfield and settled in Baton Rouge, La. He was the son of Joseph and Deborah Marsh Adams.
Folder 1: Adams, Amos, 1821-1822Add to your cart.
Two letters written in Bath, N.Y., to his parents.
Item 1: Adams, Amos to Adams, Joseph and Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1821 Aug 12Add to your cart.
Amos reports from Bath, N.Y., on the health of family members and friends and his business affairs.
Item 2: Adams, Amos to Adams, Joseph and Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1822 Jan 19Add to your cart.
Amos reports from Bath, N.Y., on family news, birth of his daughter, his father's business dealings, and New York elections.
Folder 2: Adams, Amos, 1834-1849Add to your cart.
Three letters to his wife and parents.
Folder 1: Adams, Amos to Adams, Clara Bailey, 1834 Aug 9Add to your cart.
Amos writes that he is eager to receive word from his wife, he misses her and his children, and that he "has not assumed my place in the church."
Item 2: Adams, Amos to Adams, Joseph and Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1843 Apr 13Add to your cart.
Amos reports from Baton Rouge on the birth of his son, additional family news, his business of planting cotton, Miller's preaching in the north, and politics.
Item 3: Adams, Amos to Adams, Joseph, 1849 July 28Add to your cart.
Amos writes in Baton Rouge that although he might like to, his family and he can not move to Litchfield because his wife and children are natives of Louisiana. He also writes of family news.
Folder 3: Adams, Amos, 1858-1859Add to your cart.
Two letters written in Baton Rouge to his brother Charles.
Item 1: Adams, Amos to Adams, Charles, 1858 May 8Add to your cart.
Amos writes about the condition of the river, family visits and news, Charles's election as probate judge, the Kansas question and slavery, death of his sister-in-law on the packet boat, Sultan.
Item 2: Adams, Amos to Adams, Charles, 1859 Jun 6Add to your cart.
Amos writes about family news and health, that he would like to make Litchfield his summer home, and old age.
Sub-Series 3: Adams, Anna (1814-1906)Add to your cart.
Anna (Annie) Adams (1814-1906) was the daughter of John Marsh and Sarah (MacMurphy) Adams and was the granddaghter of Joseph and Deborah (Marsh) Adams. She lived in Georgia.
Folder 1: Adams, Anna to Adams, Charles, 1861 Oct 16Add to your cart.
Five items sent to her uncle related to the death of Anna's brother Joseph Henry Adams (1843-1861), killed during the Civil War in battle on Santa Rosa Island, Fla.: her letter, "To the memory of Joseph H. Adams by one of his playmates," "In memoriam," a newspaper obituary, and the poem "Pensacola."
Sub-Series 4: Adams, Charles (1805-1883)Add to your cart.
Charles Adams (1805-1883) was born in Litchfield and eventually settled there. He was the son of Joseph and Deborah (Marsh) Adams. For additional information, see his entry in Creators.
Folder 1: Adams, Charles, circa 1810sAdd to your cart.
Two letters written in Sharon, Conn., to his parents. He writes  about his visit to Poughkeepsie with Mr. and Mrs. Pierce and that he does not like Mr. Pierce.
Folder 2: Adams, Charles, 1822-1826Add to your cart.
Four letters written in New Haven, Conn.
Item 1: Adams, Charles to Adams, Joseph and Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1822 Nov 22Add to your cart.
Charles writes about his decision to join the Church of Christ and mentions Mr. Converse and the office staff as being members of that church. He asks that two religious books be sent to him.
Item 2: Adams, Charles to Adams, Kezia, 1825 Aug 29Add to your cart.
Charles writes to his sister in detail about the death of a little girl "whom you formerly knew" and "much esteemed," Ann Eliza Starr, who found comfort in her religion at the time of her illness and death.
Item 3: Adams, Charles to Adams, Joseph and Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1825 Sep 13Add to your cart.
Charles writes about his affection for his parents, his health, his religious feelings and convictions, a speech by Mr. Gould and comments on his alcoholism, and a poem delivered by Dr. Percival.
Item 4: Adams, Charles to Adams, Joseph, 1826 Oct 10Add to your cart.
Charles inquires about family members. His business is well, but he needs cash, and discusses loans. He believes he is well situated in New Haven and feels attached to the city.
Folder 3: Adams, Charles, 1838-1863Add to your cart.
Item 1: Adams, Charles to Adams, Joseph and Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1838 Jan 29Add to your cart.
Charles writes about the birth of his daughter, Mary Fairchild, family health and news, and the death of Julius Deming.
Item 2: Adams, Charles to unnamed daughter and May, Betsey Adams, 1853 May 15Add to your cart.
Charles writes to a daughter in Bath, N.Y. that he hopes her new school will be pleasant, implores her to study and remember the Bible and its teachings and recalls his fondness for Steuben County. He also writes a note his sister Betsey about improvements made to Joseph Adams's carpets.
Item 3: Adams, Charles to Adams, Sarah and unnamed sister(s), 1858 Nov 20Add to your cart.
Charles writes to his daughters in New Haven asking them to return by train to Litchfield.
Item 4: Adams, Charles to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1862 Jun 1Add to your cart.
Charles writes to his wife their son, Frankie (Francis) has contracted scarlet fever and advises her to return home from Buffalo.
Item 5: Adams, Charles to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1863 June 16Add to your cart.
Charles writes from Washington, D.C. that he will be visiting with their son, Charlie. He reports on going to the Capitol and visiting with friends.
Folder 4: Adams, Charles, 1864-1870Add to your cart.
Item 1: Adams, Charles to unnamed daughter, 1864 Jun 7Add to your cart.
Charles writes that son Charlie has been badly wounded in the Civil War Battle of Cold Harbor. He lists the dead and wounded men from Litchfield.
Item 2: Adams, Charles to Adams, Julia Hinman and Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1864 Dec 11Add to your cart.
Charles writes to his wife that he is glad she had a good journey, describes how he misses the family members who usually sit around the dinner table, reports on family health and weather.
Item 3: Adams, Charles to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1869 Apr 28Add to your cart.
Charles writes to his wife from Brooklyn, N.Y., that they are packing daughter Julia's effects and will return in several days. He reports on Julia and other visitors.
Item 4: Adams, Charles to How, Julia Adams, 1870 Nov 15Add to your cart.
Charles writes to his daughter Julia from Brooklyn, N.Y., about the journey there with other daughters from Bath and plans for his return.
Folder 5: Kilbourn, Myron to Adams, Charles, 1864 Jul 23Add to your cart.
Kilbourn's letter accompanied the return of Charles Adams Jr.'s watch.
Folder 6: Lawrence, William R. to Adams, Charles, 1868 Feb. 11Add to your cart.
Lawrence, son of Amos Lawrence, writes about their common ancestor, Rev. Amos Adams (1728-1775). Enclosed is a letter to Lawrence from C. H. Dillaway, 1868 Feb 7.
Folder 7: [McMather?], D. to Adams, Charles, 1877 Mar 8Add to your cart.
[McMather?], a longtime friend of Adams, writes about people and places they knew in Bath, N.Y.
Folder 8: Peck, Tracy to Adams, Charles, 1859 May 14Add to your cart.
Peck, who is married to Adams's aunt Sally Adams, acknowledges receipt for rent and is concerned that it is more than he can afford to pay. Peck would be glad to see Adams and his family and hopes to ride to Litchfield. Peck expects Litchfield will have much business before the legislature this session because South Farms is asking to be made into a town.
Folder 9: Rogers, Henry W. to Adams, Charles, 1859-1869Add to your cart.
Four letters from Henry W. Rogers, husband of Charles Adams's sister Kezia Adams. He writes of Charles's daughters in Buffalo and family and business matters.
Folder 10: Valentine to Adams, Charles, circa 1855Add to your cart.
Poem written by "Valentine" about Adams's poetry-writing ability.
Folder 11: Weare, Mary Rogers to Adams, Charles, 1862 Mar 13Add to your cart.
Weare writes about her present situation in Cedar Rapids and family news.
Folder 12: Wessells, Leverett W. to Adams, Charles, 1862Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Alexandria, Va., to his friend Adams about details of his encampment during the Civil War. The health of the soldiers, including Adams's son Charles, is good, their behavior is excellent, and he is eager to go to battle. He asks Adams to look into the matter of courts taxing is attendance at courts.
Folder 13: [?], Ellena, 1876Add to your cart.
Two letters written by Ellena to her guardian, Adams. She explains why she is in New York and asks for money with which to purchase a new winter outfit. She thanks him for the draft and describes her activities including attending a concert and news from friends and relatives.
Sub-Series 5: Adams, Charles (1845-1864)Add to your cart.
Charles Adams (1845-1864) was the son of Charles and Julia Hinman Adams and grandson of Joseph and Deborah Marsh Adams. He was born in Litchfield. When the Civil War broke out, he enlisted in the 19th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers in 1862. On June 11, 1864, he died of wounds received on June 1 during the Battle of Cold Harbor. During the war, Adams regularly wrote letters to his parents and sisters. He recorded his thoughts about Generals McClellan, Burnside, and Grant, and President Lincoln; life in camp (maintaining and outfitting tents, sleeping arrangements, food, prayer meetings, entertainments and lectures, snowball battles); support for the Emancipation Proclamation; his belief in the cause; postings, guard duty, inspections, and drills; encouraging enlistment; speculation about duration of war and upcoming military activities; his cousin, Charles Hinman Graves, and other relatives he sees; the 40th N.Y. and Bull Run; African-American dock and government stores workers; guarding “contrabands” (freed or former slaves) from Virginia and Maryland; news of other Litchfield residents; politics in Connecticut; and the weather.
Folder 1: Adams, Charles, 1860Add to your cart.
Four letters to Adams's father, mother, and sisters Mary and Sarah describing going to school, church, and other childhood activities and interests.
Folder 2: Adams, Charles, 1861Add to your cart.
Two draft letters, one to Adams's mother and one to his cousin in Latin, in which he discuss the weather and going to church.
Folder 3: Adams, Charles, 1862 Aug-SepAdd to your cart.
Four Civil War letters written in Alexandria, Va.
Folder 4: Adams, Charles, 1862 OctAdd to your cart.
Five Civil War letters written in camp near Alexandria, Va.
Folder 5: Adams, Charles, 1862 NovAdd to your cart.
Four Civil War letters written in camp near Alexandria, Va. and Alexandria.
Folder 6: Adams, Charles, 1862 DecAdd to your cart.
Four Civil War letters written in Alexandria, Va.
Folder 7: Adams, Charles, 1863 JanAdd to your cart.
Four Civil War letters written in camp near Alexandria, Va. and Head Quarters near Fort Worth, Va.
Folder 8: Adams, Charles, 1863 FebAdd to your cart.
Two Civil War letters written in Head Quarters near Fort Worth, Va.
Folder 9: Adams, Charles, 1863 MarAdd to your cart.
Three Civil War letters written at Head Quarters of General Tyler.
Folder 10: Adams, Charles, 1863 AprAdd to your cart.
Two Civil War letters written at Head Quarters of General Tyler.
Folder 11: Adams, Charles, 1863 MayAdd to your cart.
Three Civil War letters written in Arlington House, Va.
Folder 12: Adams, Charles, 1863 JunAdd to your cart.
Two Civil War letters written in Arlington House, Va.
Folder 13: Adams, Charles, 1863 NovAdd to your cart.
Three Civil War letters written at Knight General Hospital, New Haven.
Folder 14: Adams, Charles, 1863 DecAdd to your cart.
Three Civil War letters written at Bedloe's Island, New York, and Fort Worth, Va.
Folder 15: Adams, Charles, 1864 JanAdd to your cart.
Three Civil War letters written at Fort Worth, Va.
Folder 16: Adams, Charles, 1864 FebAdd to your cart.
Four Civil War letters written at Fort Worth, Va.
Folder 17: Adams, Charles, 1864 MarAdd to your cart.
Three Civil War letters written at Fort Worth, Va.
Folder 18: Adams, Charles, 1864 AprAdd to your cart.
Five Civil War letters written at Fort Worth, Va.
Folder 19: Adams, Charles, 1864 MayAdd to your cart.
Two Civil War letters, one written at Fort Worth, Va., the other at Fort Craig, Va.
Folder 20: Gilbert, S. B. to relatives of Charles Adams Jr., 1864 Jun 15Add to your cart.
Solicitation card from S. B. Gilbert, notary public, general claim agent, "collects pensions, bounties, and back pay, due families or relatives of deceased officers or soldiers."
Folder 21: Rogers, Henry to relatives of Charles Adams Jr., circa 1864 Jun 15Add to your cart.
Solicitation card from Attorney Henry Rogers, "pensions, bounty pay procured for discharged soldiers and relatives of deceased officers and soldiers."
Sub-Series 6: Adams, Charles Chauncey (1788-1814)Add to your cart.
Charles Chauncey Adams (1788-1814) was the son of Dr. Henry Adams and Sarah Pelton Adams and the nephew of Joseph Adams and Deborah Marsh Adams. He was a printer and newspaper publisher in Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
Folder 1: Adams, Charles Chauncey to Adams, Joseph, 1807 Nov 23Add to your cart.
Adams expresses sympathy for the death of his uncle Joseph's brother and well wishes for the good health of Joseph's children. Adams regretfully turns down his uncle's  offer to come to Litchfield to publish a neutral newspaper, citing the remaining two years on his apprenticeship and perhaps two more after that. Adams indicates he is opposed to newspapers which are affiliated with political parties.
Sub-Series 7: Adams, Dinah Wiley (1764?-1811)Add to your cart.
Dinah Wiley Adams (1764?-1811) was married to Rev. Thomas Adams (1764-1797) and was the sister-in-law of Joseph Adams.
Folder 1: Adams, Dinah Wiley to Adams, Joseph, 1811 Jun 12Add to your cart.
Dinah has traveled to Rehoboth, Mass., "in search of health" and inquires where she might find relatives in New England. She misses her son.
Sub-Series 8: Adams, Henry (1794-1842)Add to your cart.
Henry Adams (1794-1842) was the son of Joseph and Deborah Marsh Adams. He was born in Litchfield. For a time in the 1820s, he was a newspaper publisher in Huntsville, Ala. In 1829, he purchased The Litchfield County Post and renamed it The Litchfield Enquirer. He published the paper until his death by accidental drowning in 1842.
Folder 1: Adams, Henry, 1826Add to your cart.
Two letters written to his father.
Item 1: Adams, Henry to Adams, Joseph, 1826 Feb 12Add to your cart.
Henry writes from Huntsville, Ala., about his health. He also reports Mr. Alden has left Huntsville and Henry is owed $2,000 and will go to court in an attempt to collect it. He expresses his disappointment in his business affairs since arriving in Huntsville six years ago. He inquires about family members and wonders about his future business prospects.
Item 2: Adams, Henry to Adams, Joseph, 1826 May 31Add to your cart.
Henry writes from Owego, N.Y., that in the course of his travel from Alabama he has lost or been robbed of about $530. He asks for a loan of $200 and says he will repay it after bringing his business in Huntsville to a final close. Since coming of age, he has never been in so unpleasant a situation as regards money. He also offers news of family and friends.
Sub-Series 9: Adams, Henry (1835-1889)Add to your cart.
Henry Adams (1835-1889) was the son of Charles and Julia Hinman Adams.
Folder 1: Adams, Henry to Wheelock, Mary Adams, circa 1854Add to your cart.
Adams writes to sister about family and friends and his attendance at a church service.
Sub-Series 10: Adams, Joseph (1767-1856)Add to your cart.
Joseph Adams (1767-1856) was the son of Rev. Amos and Elizabeth Prentice Adams. For additional information, see his entry in Creators.
Folder 1: Adams, Joseph to Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1825 Aug 17Add to your cart.
Joseph writes to his wife in Geneva, N.Y., about his travel so far. He was taken very sick in Albany, which continued as he traveled by stage through New York. He is extremely pleased with the country and would leave Litchfield were he a young man. He reports on the health of Mr. Chapman.
Folder 2: Barber, Timothy  to Adams, Jospeh, 1843 Dec 16Add to your cart.
Barber writes from Madison, Ind. with news of his family and its whereabouts.
Folder 3: Bates, Buell L. to Adams, Joseph, 1825 Jun 1Add to your cart.
Bates writes regarding putting Henry (his son?) out to "some place." His father thinks it best, but he does not agree. He requests that Adams do nothing about "getting a place."
Folder 4: Breck, Joseph to Adams, Joseph, 1837 Jan 30Add to your cart.
Breck, who is married to Sarah Bullard, a niece of Joseph, writes to inform Adams that his sister Elizabeth has died.
Folder 5: Buell, David to Adams, Joseph, 1816 Feb 21Add to your cart.
Buell writes from Troy, N.Y., regarding payment of William Baldwin's note, a tombstone to be placed in Troy, and poor business conditions.
Folder 6: Bullard, John to Adams, Joseph, 1813 Jan 15Add to your cart.
Bullard, who was married to Joseph Adams's sister Elizabeth, writes from Pepperell, Mass. regarding Adams's feeling that Lancaster is a pleasant town, but has high taxes. Still, it would be very agreeable if Adams settled there. Bullard discusses present down business conditions and the ongoing war, the health of his family, activities of his sons Henry and Royal.
Folder 7: Bullard, John to Adams, Joseph, 1813 Apr 13Add to your cart.
Bullard writes from Pepperell, Mass., that he is glad to hear of the good health of Adams's family, nephew William Adams has died in South Carolina and the estate will need an agent, would Adams be willing to come to Boston, the health of his family, and a legal matter involving Douglas Blanding.
Folder 8: Bullard, John to Adams, Joseph, 1817 Aug 9Add to your cart.
Bullard writes from Pepperell, Mass., expressing his concerns with Adams's demand for payment. Bullard mentions Amos Lawrence, Giles Richards, and Adams's sister Sally Adams Richards as possible agents for him.
Folder 9: Bullard, John to Adams, Joseph, 1818 Jul 21Add to your cart.
Bullard writes from Pepperell, Mass., that his son Charles has written to his son Royal to communicate Adams's wishes. Bullard will be happy to visit Adams but not earlier than September. Political affairs in Connecticut have given a shock to many men. Bullard reports on the health of his family and friends.
Folder 10: Bullard, Royal to Adams, Joseph, 1809-1813Add to your cart.
Royal Bullard (1789-1846) was the nephew of Joseph and Deborah Marsh Adams.
Item 1: Bullard, Royal to Adams, Joseph, 1809 Mar 8Add to your cart.
Bullard writes from Yale about his plans to return to Pepperell, whether his father can attend commencement, and bringing family members to New Haven. He leaves it to Adams to best judge his plan.
Item 2: Bullard, Royal to Adams, Joseph, 1811 May 10Add to your cart.
Bullard writes from Boston on his and his Aunt Richards's behalf. Adams son Henry is well. Bullard remembers Joseph well for his money favors while in Connecticut. He reports news about his family and describes his present situations. He hopes to pass the bar and that money he had of Mrs. H. will be called for. It would be extremely difficult for his father to assist him.
Item 3: Bullard, Royal to Adams, Joseph, 1813 Jun 25Add to your cart.
Bullard writes from Camden, S.C. regarding Mr. Lang's claim of about $10,000, in which Adams and Mr. Blanding is involved.
Folder 11: Chamberlain, Oliver E. to Adams, Joseph, 1843 Feb 10Add to your cart.
Chamberlain writes from Amenia Union, N.Y. to inform Adams that he should not be charged for advertising a stage company he no longer owns.
Folder 12: Church, Rollin to Adams, Joseph, 1820 Oct 7Add to your cart.
Church requests that he enter the name of Mrs. Rollin Church upon Adams's list for domestic manufacturing a pair of worsted stockings for the exhibition.
Folder 13: Hartford Fire Insurance Company to Adams, Joseph, 1819 Feb 5Add to your cart.
Letter from Walter Mitchell, secretary, appointing Adams surveyor for the company for Litchfield and the neighborhood.
Folder 14: Holt, Ebenezer to Adams, Joseph, 1811 Feb 4Add to your cart.
Holt, a relative of Adams sister Kezia Adams Holt, requests Adams's assistance in collecting notes. If it can be done in a timely fashion, he will be able to pay a note at a considerable discount.
Folder 15: Holt, Philemon to Adams, Joseph, 1811-1812Add to your cart.
Holt appears to be a relative of Joseph Adams's sister Kezia Adams Holt.
Item 1: Holt, Philemon to Adams, Joseph, 1811 Mar 7Add to your cart.
Holt writes from Willington, Conn., that he has purchased a farm for his son and wishes Adams to assist with collecting notes with which Holt can pay the man from whom he purchased the farm.
Item 2: Holt, Philemon to Adams, Joseph, 1811 Apr 4Add to your cart.
Holt writes from Willington, Conn., that he has purchased a farm and wishes Adams to assist with collecting notes. The man from whom he purchased the farm is in want of money.
Item 3: Holt, Philemon to Adams, Joseph, 1812 Aug 10Add to your cart.
Holt writes from Willington, Conn., seeking Adams's advice regarding the validity of a deed for land that is subject to an action Capt. Hitchcock is about to commence.
Folder 16: Hurlbut, Samuel to Adams, Joseph, 1842 Dec 8Add to your cart.
Hurlbut, writing from Baltimore, encloses a draft for Adams's bill.
Folder 17: Lawrence, Amos to Adams, Joseph, 1823 Jul 26Add to your cart.
Amos Lawrence (1786-1852) married Sarah Richards, the daughter of Sarah Adams Richards and niece of Joseph Adams. He writes from Boston that Adams's sister's condition is very comfortable. He gives news about his family's activities and health.
Folder 18: Lawrence, Amos to Adams, Joseph, 1845 Feb 1Add to your cart.
Lawrence, writing from Boston, gives a thorough accounting of family members alive and dead. He states his philosophy of philanthropy and discusses feelings towards his wealth and children.
Folder 19: Lawrence, Amos to Adams, Joseph, 1851 Apr 27Add to your cart.
Lawrence, writing from Boston, declines to give introductions in all cases, but Mr. Bulkley may say that Mrs. Bulkley is a relative of his children. He reports on his and his family's health and that he is afflicted because of the death of a favorite nephew, Robert Appleton.
Folder 20: Lovell, Joseph and Elizabeth Partridge Lovell to Adams, Joseph, 1818 May 9Add to your cart.
Lovell, who was married to Joseph's aunt Jemima (Adams) Lovell before she died, reports from Medway, Mass., on the health of the family.
Folder 21: May, James to Adams, Joseph, 1820 Apr 14Add to your cart.
May, husband of Joseph Adams's daughter Betsey, reports from Catherine, N.Y., that conditions are favorable and Amos will do better there than in Litchfield.
Folder 22: Peck, Tracy to Adams, Joseph, 1818-1844Add to your cart.
Three letters from Tracy Peck, who married Joseph Adams's sister Sally Adams, writing from Bristol, Conn.
Item 1: Peck, Tracy and Peck, Sally Adams to Adams, Joseph and Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1818 Oct 2Add to your cart.
Peck reports the birth of a daughter.
Item 2: Peck, Tracy to Adams, Joseph, 1822 Dec. 3Add to your cart.
Peck reports all are well, except for Joseph, who is quite sick. He discusses the claim of Sarah [Null?].
Item 3: Peck, Tracy to Adams, Joseph, 1844 Mar 5Add to your cart.
Peck would like Adams's opinion as to the value of his daughter Sally's share of the property of the late Henry Adams. Mary Adams is anxious to buy out the share of the same.
Folder 23: Richards, Giles to Adams, Joseph, 1798 Feb 25Add to your cart.
Richards, who is married to Joseph's sister Sally Adams, writes from Boston regarding claims of the Joseph's late brother Thomas Adams. Richards provides an accounting. He also relates family news.
Folder 24: Spencer, Truman to Adams, Joseph, 1842 May 1Add to your cart.
Spencer writes from Camden, N.Y., regarding his subscription to The Litchfield Enqurier.
Folder 25: Starr, William to Adams, Joseph, 1820 Dec 18Add to your cart.
Starr, writing from Goshen, Conn., relates that Adams had a complaint lodged against Starr and Guy Wadhams for playing cards the day before Thanksgiving. He would like to resolve the matter and asks what the fine is, wishing that Adams would be as reasonable in their fines as he consistently can.
Folder 26: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Adams, Joseph, 1814Add to your cart.
Two letters written in Washington, D.C., while Tallmadge was serving in the U.S. House of Representatives.
Item 1: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Adams, Joseph, 1814 Feb 16Add to your cart.
Tallmadge writes that he finds that no further aid is needed from him to obtain Adams's money in South Carolina, but if he needs it, he shall "very cheerfully afford it." If the weather permits, he shall be glad if Adams would survey several of his properties.
Item 2: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Adams, Joseph, 1814 Mar 5Add to your cart.
Tallmadge has written to Mr. Huntington on the subject. If he needs any further aid from Adams "to make a statement for the assessor, please to afford it." Tallmadge reports on appropriations made in the House.
Folder 27: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Adams, Joseph, 1816Add to your cart.
Two letters written in Washington, D.C., while Tallmadge was serving in the U.S. House of Representatives.
Item 1: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Adams, Joseph, 1816 Feb 7Add to your cart.
Tallmadge discusses a transaction he will conduct on behalf of Adams relative to the value of "D'ft on Charleston" and the sale of Adams's "D'ft" to a gentleman in Georgetown. He relates percentages and specifies which banks are to be used to make payment.
Item 2: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Adams, Joseph, 1816 Mar 11Add to your cart.
Tallmadge reports on the sale of Adams's "D'ft." He has received payment and purchased a bill on New York at 10 percent premium.
Folder 28: Tallmadge, Benjamin to Adams, Joseph, 1823 May 3Add to your cart.
Tallmadge, writing from Litchfield to Adams in Brooklyn, relates details of Tallmadge's trip to Litchfield via New Haven. He delivered Adams's letter to his wife. Adams's family is all well and since Mrs. Adams will write soon, he will not go into further reporting "domestic matters." He reports on several recent deaths which have occurred in Litchfield.
Folder 29: Wolcott, Oliver (1823-1856), circa 1845 Mar 31Add to your cart.
Wolcott sends an invitation to Adams on behalf of the Whigs of Litchfield to attend the polls and then enjoy "suitable refreshments" at the Mansion House.
Sub-Series 11: Adams, Joseph (1838-1870)Add to your cart.
Joseph Adams (1838-1870) was the son of Charles and Julia Hinman Adams.
Folder 1: Adams, Joseph to Adams, Charles, 1862 May 8Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Terryville, Conn., to thank his mother for $3 with which to buy Charlie a hat. He describes how Charlie will not keep a hat on. He recalls the recent sad deaths of Sarah and Frankie in Terryville and reports on the health of the family. He is away on business half the time. He reports on his garden. Willie is off to school and supposes Ella will comfort him if he is homesick.
Sub-Series 12: Adams, Julia Hinman (1810-1869)Add to your cart.
Julia Hinman Adams was the second wife of Charles Adams. They married in 1830. He was previously married to Jane Hinman Adams (Julia's sister), who died in 1827.
Folder 1: Adams, Julia Hinman, 1851-1852Add to your cart.
Two letters, one to her father and one to her daughter.
Item 1: Adams, Julia Hinman to Hinman, Scovil, 1851Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Litchfield to her father about sickness in and news of her family, that she is tired and dispirited, and about news of friends.
Item 2: Adams, Julia Hinman to Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1853 Aug 22Add to your cart.
Adams writes to her daughter saying that it would be nice if she and Julia were back home. She reports on family news and visits by relatives.
Folder 2: Adams, Julia Hinman, 1862-1867Add to your cart.
Four letters to family members.
Item 1: Adams, Julia Hinman to Adams, Mary, 1862 May 22Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Buffalo to her daughter about family and friends she sees, her tour of Buffalo, and her husband's and her sadness over the recent death of daughter Sarah.
Item 2: Adams, Julia Hinman to unnamed son, 1862 May 28Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Buffalo about her impressions of the city, encountering several Sisters of Charity, and news of family and friends.
Item 3: Adams, Julia Hinman to Adams, Charles, 1864 Nov 17Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Terryville, Conn., to her husband about the health of Joseph, the weather and thinking of him, her health, and family news. Also on the sheet is a letter from her daughter Ella Adams to Ella's sister Mary.
Item 4: Adams, Julia Hinman to Adams, Charles, 1867 Jun 18Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Brooklyn, N.Y., to her husband about visiting with Joseph in Plymouth, meeting up with Mr. McKee en route to Brooklyn, stops along the way, family news, the children are well, and what she is eating.
Item 5: [?] to Adams, Julia Hinman, circa 1860sAdd to your cart.
Empty envelope.
Folder 3: Curtiss, Hannah E. to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1860 Jan 26Add to your cart.
Curtiss writes from Hartford about the health of friends, the weather, her sore hand, and indelible pencils and obtaining a highly recommended ink. She received "that letter" from her mother, who thinks she should go to Ravenna as soon as the canal opens and keep house. She thinks she should rather stay in this part of the world.
Folder 4: How, James (1840-1869) to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1864 Mar 13Add to your cart.
How writes to his mother-in-law from Brooklyn that it has been ten months since they were married and they are more happy each day. He writes about his activities, including his work for charitable institution, City Dispensary, and news from family, including from Charlie in camp.
Sub-Series 13: Adams, Sarah MacMurphy (1806-1901)Add to your cart.
Sarah MacMurphy Adams married John Marsh Adams, son of Joseph and Deborah Marsh Adams.
Folder 1: Adams, Sarah McMurphy to Adams, Joseph and Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1842 Jun 17-18Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Augusta, Ga., about her health and that of her family, gladness that Charles is going to settle in Litchfield, and the transfer of her and her husband's interest in the real estate of Henry Adams to his sister Mary. On the same sheet is notarized and signed statement by John Marsh Adams and Sarah Adams transferring their interest as referenced in the letter.
Sub-Series 14: Adams, Sarah (1840-1862)Add to your cart.
Sarah Adams (1840-1862) was the daughter of Charles and Julia (Hinman) Adams.
Folder 1: Adams, Sarah, 1855-1859Add to your cart.
Three letters to her parents.
Item 1: Adams, Sarah to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1855 Dec 10Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Hart Seminary in Plymouth about school life, activities, what she is reading, and news of some of the other girls.
Item 2: Adams, Sarah to Adams, Charles, 1859 Jun 7Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Bath, N.Y., that she arrived three hours late because an engine conveying a freight train exploded outside of Port Jervis. She offers her account of the explosion and its aftermath. A man who introduced himself as Mr. Sanford said her father intended to return to Litchfield. She reports family news.
Item 3: Adams, Sarah to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1859 Oct 22Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Terryville, Conn., that sister Emma asked to her to write and ask her mother to send a slop pail and foot tub for a bath tub for baby. Adams did not sleep well and is beginning to lose her faith in the blisters. She has made a visit long enough.
Folder 2: Letters from friends to Adams, Sarah, 1856-1859Add to your cart.
Item 1: Rogers, D. to Adams, Sarah, 1859 Nov 8Add to your cart.
Rogers writes from New Haven about a letter written but not sent, the value of reading, her headache and a walk, an upcoming visit by Clara and how she loves her friends, and wonders about the conditions of Adams's eyes.
Item 2: Rogers, D. to Adams, Sarah, circa 1859 NovAdd to your cart.
Letter fragment in which Rogers writes about Clara leaving and the house feeling different, her homesickness for Litchfield, her headache today, and her having wasted the day.
Item 3: Stoddard, F. E. to Adams, Sarah, 1856 Jun 1Add to your cart.
Stoddard writes from Seymour that he was in New Haven at the same time as Mary but did not see her. Stoddard would like to see Mary and Sarah sometime this summer. Stoddard has started taking music lessons in New Haven. Stoddard's family's black girl has run away and they are without help.
Item 4: [?], Maria to Adams, Sarah, 1856 Feb 17Add to your cart.
Maria writes from Plymouth about letters she has received, her schooling, and fellow students.
Folder 3: Rogers, Henry W. to Adams, Sarah, 1859 Aug 5Add to your cart.
Adams writes from Buffalo to his niece about Sarah's nice words about Julia, family news, reading, and his activities.
Sub-Series 15: Baldwin, Ella Adams (1852-?)Add to your cart.
Ella Adams Baldwin was the daughter of Charles and Julia Hinman Adams.
Folder 1: Baldwin, Ella Adams to Adams, Charles, 1870 Feb 20Add to your cart.
Baldwin writes from Brooklyn about listening to public speakers, letters she's received, attending church, visiting Harriet De Puy, making many visits to New York, turning eighteen tomorrow, returning home, and Joel Hinman.
Sub-Series 16: Bulkley, Mary Adams (1830-1900)Add to your cart.
Mary Adams Bulkley was the daughter of John Marsh and Sarah MacMurphy Adams.
Folder 1: Bulkey, Mary Adams, 1839, 1868Add to your cart.
Item 1: Bulkley, Mary Adams to Adams, Joseph and Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1839 May 31Add to your cart.
Bulkley writes to her grandparents about news of her sisters, the new baby's name, sending presents, and the scarlet fever that is in and about town.
Item 2: Bulkley, Mary Adams to Adams, Charles, 1868 Jun 30Add to your cart.
Bulkley writes to her uncle about visiting next week with her family, provided he finds this an agreeable arrangement.
Sub-Series 17: Bullard, Henry Adams (1788-1851)Add to your cart.
Henry Adams Bullard (1788-1851) was the son of Rev. John and Elizabeth Adams Bullard. He was the nephew of Joseph Adams.
Folder 1: Bullard, Henry Adams, 1832-1833Add to your cart.
Two letters written from Washington, D.C. to his uncle Joseph Adams while serving in the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana.
Item 1: Bullard, Henry Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1832 Apr 17Add to your cart.
Bullard writes that he is grateful for his uncle's letter with interesting details of himself and his family. Since leaving New England, Bullard has had no opportunity to become acquainted with that branch of the family. He relates details about his family. The Jackson heresy has not tainted him and he hopes to see the day when the present misrule will be overturned. He hopes to be able to visit Litchfield in the fall.
Item 2: Bullard, Henry Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1833 Feb 28Add to your cart.
Bullard writes that he visited with Charles, who travelled with his wife and son to Baltimore. Bullard is eager to return home after a long absence. Unfortunately, he was unable to visit Adams because one of his children was sick and later died. There was constant alarm about cholera. He has heard from Aunt Richards, who is feeble. He discusses the new tariff.
Sub-Series 18: Coggswell, Elizabeth Rowland (1802-?)Add to your cart.
Elizabeth Rowland Coggswell (1802-?) was the niece of Joseph and Deborah Marsh Adams.
Folder 1: Coggswell, Elizabeth Rowland, 1828, 1830Add to your cart.
Two letters written in Cincinnati to Elizabeth's uncle Joseph Adams.
Item 1: Coggswell, Elizabeth Rowland to Adams, Joseph, 1828 Nov 25Add to your cart.
Coggswell writes that she hopes to hear more often from Litchfield and misses her family and friends. They are living comfortably and rent from Mr. Woodward. She lost her son. There has been a great revival of religion. She tells of visits and hearing from family members.
Item 2: Coggswell, Osmond and Coggswell, Elizabeth Rowland to Adams, Joseph, 1830 Nov 8Add to your cart.
Osmond and Elizabeth Coggswell write that they sorry to have taken so long to write after visiting Litchfield. They describe the travel back to Cincinnati. They spent time with Mr. Collier and his family. Mr. Richards is building a large manufactory in Dayton and all in good health.
Sub-Series 19: Dana, Rev. Malcolm McG.Add to your cart.
Folder 1: Dana, Rev. Malcolm McG. to Hubbard, John H., 1864 Jun 9Add to your cart.
Two letters regarding the condition and transportation of Charles Adams (1839-1864), badly wounded in the Civil War Battle of Cold Harbor.
Sub-Series 20: Deming, Frances Adams (1847-1901)Add to your cart.
Frances Adams Deming (1847-1901) was the daughter of Charles and Julia Hinman Adams.
Folder 1: Deming, Frances Adams to Adams, Sarah, circa 1860 JunAdd to your cart.
Frances writes to her sister and hopes she will be very much better when she returns. Mary attended a wedding and a party at the Pinnacle. Frances mentions Julia, Susie Rogers, and Sophie. Frances likes school and would go all summer if father wanted her to.
Sub-Series 21: De Puy, Harriet Adams (1822-1914)Add to your cart.
Harriet Adams De Puy was the daughter of Amos and Eliza Dean Adams.
Folder 1: De Puy, Harriet Adams, 1845, 1879Add to your cart.
Item 1: De Puy, Harriet Adams to Adams, Joseph and Adams, Deborah Marsh, 1845 May 3Add to your cart.
De Puy writes from Bath about the death of sister Ann Eliza. The health of her family is good and she enjoys their company. She hears that Joseph and Deborah Adams may visit Bath in the summer and nothing would please her more than seeing them.
Item 2: De Puy, Harriet Adams to Adams, Charles, 1879 Sep 30Add to your cart.
De Puy writes from New York City about her family history.
Sub-Series 22: Doty, T.Add to your cart.
Folder 1: Doty, T. to Terry, James, 1870 May 17Add to your cart.
Telegram sent from Champaign, Ill., which informs Terry that J. H. Adams died there. Will put body in vault and wait fro instruction.
Sub-Series 23: Graves, Mary Hinman (1812-1856)Add to your cart.
Mary Hinman Graves (1812-1856) was the sister of Julia Hinman Adams, wife of Charles Adams.
Folder 1: Graves, Mary Hinman, 1850-1853Add to your cart.
Five letters to her sister and father.
Item 1: Graves, Mary Hinman to Hinman, Scovil, 1850 Aug 9Add to your cart.
Graves writes from Bristol, R.I. Her husband has become so debilitated by the heat that they have left Jamaica and moved to the home of father Graves. If Mr. Graves's health improves, they will return before the cold weather. Her husband endured the voyage from Kingston but is weak.
Item 2: Graves, Mary Hinman to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1850 Oct 2Add to your cart.
Graves writes from Bristol, R.I. Mr. Graves is in very weak condition. It is not possible that he can live long in his present emaciated, feeble state. Julia Adams forwarded this letter to Scovil Hinman with an additional note to say that she is now safely in Litchfield after a recently traveling 800 miles to visit family.
Item 3: Graves, Mary Hinman to Hinman, Scovil, 1851 Feb 27Add to your cart.
Graves writes from Bristol, R.I., that she has returned from Boston and is staying with father Graves. She is lonely and imagines how lonely her father is, and wishes she had a home into which she could take him and care for him, but her future plans are uncertain.
Item 4: Graves, Mary Hinman to Hinman, Scovil, 1852 FebAdd to your cart.
Graves writes from Hartford. She is visiting, but she is actively engaged with her needle and her pen to assist in the support of her dear son and herself. She describes activities in Hartford and her's son religious inclinations.
Item 5: Graves, Mary Hinman to Adams, Julia Himan, 1853 Feb 8Add to your cart.
Graves writes from Framingham, Mass. She has been in East Boston, where Charlie is attending school. She describes her activities in Boston. She wishes she could attend to her father, but is duty bound to provide for Charlie. The letter has a note from Mary Adams indicating it was sent on to Scovil Hinman.
Item 6: Graves, Mary Hinman, empty envelope addressed to Hinman, Scovil, [circa 1850s] Mar 26Add to your cart.
Sub-Series 24: Hinman, Mary ColesAdd to your cart.
Mary Coles Hinman was the second wife of Scovil Hinman, father-in-law of Charles Adams.
Folder 1: Hinman, Mary Coles, 1858-circa 1864Add to your cart.
Four letters to her step-grandchildren.
Item 1: Hinman, Mary Coles to unnamed stepchildren, 1858 Oct 18Add to your cart.
Hinman writes from New Haven with news of her and her husband's activities and her desire to see the children.
Item 2: Hinman, Mary Coles to Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1861 Oct 7Add to your cart.
Hinman writes from Stonington, Conn., about her activties there, family and friends, and her desire to see her grandchildren.
Item 3: Hinman, Mary Coles to Adams, Sarah, 1861 Oct 8Add to your cart.
Hinman writes from Stonington, Conn., about her family and friends and her activities.
Item 4: Hinman, Mary Coles to unnamed stepchildren, circa 1864 May 24Add to your cart.
Hinman writes from New Haven about her wish to visit Litchfield, her attire and that of her grandchildren, what she has been eating, and other activities.
Sub-Series 25: Hubbard, John H. (John Henry) (1804-1872)Add to your cart.
Folder 1: Hubbard, John H., 1864Add to your cart.
Correspondence related to the death of Charles Adams (1845-1864) from wounds received during the Civil War Battle of Cold Harbor.
Item 1: Hubbard, John H., 1864 Jun 11Add to your cart.
Unaddressed telegraph message stating that Charlie Adams died this morning. "I was with him." Offers a few additional details.
Item 2: Hubbard, John H. to his wife, 1864 Jun 11Add to your cart.
Writing from Washington, D.C., Hubbard describes the circumstances surrounding the death of Charles Adams (1845-1864) and the arrangements he is making for transfer of the body to Litchfield.
Item 3: Hubbard, John H., ledger sheet, 1864 Jun 11Add to your cart.
Contains copies of his correspondence related to the death of Charles Adams.
Sub-Series 26: May, Betsey Adams (1796-1877)Add to your cart.
Betsey Adams May was a daughter of Joseph Adams.
Folder 1: Buel, C. [Charlotte?] to May, Betsey Adams, 1815 Aug 28Add to your cart.
Buel writes from Troy, N.Y., with news of her and her family's health. Her mother begs Betsey's mother to accept the shawl for Betsey and the vest for Amos.
Folder 2: May, Betsey Adams, 1868-1869Add to your cart.
Two letters written from Bath, N.Y. to her brother.
Item 1: May, Betsey Adams to Adams, Charles, 1868 Jan 31Add to your cart.
May writes about comfort of Julia and Adams now small family, but that he is not far away from them should he need to visit. She reports on her family's health and activities. There have been many changes in Bath since he was there. She never receives letters from the Adams family.
Item 2: May, Betsey Adams to Adams, Charles, 1869 Jan 8Add to your cart.
May writes that because of her eyes, it is hard for her to write or read. She reports on her and her family's health and activities and is sorry to hear Julia is doing so poorly. She hopes they can visit this summer and recalls their visit last summer. Bath has been visited by another fire this winter.
Sub-Series 27: Richards, Amos Adams (1794-1872)Add to your cart.
Amos Adams Richards (1794-1872) was the son of Giles and Sally (Adams) Richards. Joseph Adams was his uncle.
Folder 1: Richards, Amos Adams, 1813, 1866Add to your cart.
Two letters, one to his uncle and one to his cousin.
Item 1: Richards, Amos Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1813 Aug 1Add to your cart.
Richards writes from Boston about his and his family's health, his father's plan to give up his tools so he and Giles can establish themselves in Smithfield, R.I., how they plan to establish a business, American and British ships, and finding a place for Amos, but there has never been a worse time for business
Item 2: Richards, Amos Adams to Adams, Charles, 1866 Dec 14Add to your cart.
Richards writes from Urbana, Ohio, and recalls visiting Litchfield in 1813 and other events in his life, reports on his family, recalls what he knows of Adams's family, and discusses his philosophy of life.
Sub-Series 28: Richards, Sarah Adams (1769-1836)Add to your cart.
Sarah Adams Richards was a sister of Joseph Adams.
Folder 1: Richards, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1798 Jun 12Add to your cart.
Richards writes from Charleston, S.C. about their late brother Thomas's affairs, a new baby has been added to the family, Mr. Richards traveling in New Hampshire and is much perplexed about his business matters, and family news.
Folder 2: Richards, Sarah Adams, 1800Add to your cart.
Two letters written in Cambridge, Mass., to her brother.
Item 1: Richards, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1800 Oct 1Add to your cart.
Richards writes that she has not heard from him in over twelve months. She would like to visit, but Mr. Giles business requires him to travel and if he heads for the vicinity of Litchfield, she will accompany him. She reports on her and her family's health.
Item 2: Richards, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1800 Nov 23Add to your cart.
Richards writes about her pleasure of hearing from Adams. Mr. Richards has been out of health lately provoked by his business affairs, but he has lately improved them to avoid embarrassment. He is at a loss as to what business to persue. She regrets being at a distance from her only brother. She reports on family health. She would be eager to read any news from the widow of their brother.
Folder 3: Richards, Sarah Adams, 1811-1813Add to your cart.
Three letters to her brother Joseph Adams.
Item 1: Richards, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1811 Jun 29Add to your cart.
Richards reports on family news and health and the possibility of visiting Adams.
Item 2: Richards, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1813 Apr 11Add to your cart.
Richards writes from Boston to report he death of their nephew William in Camden, S.C. and the status of his personal property and real estate and claims made against it. She would like Adams to render his opinion on the matter. She reports on the health of the family.
Item 3: Richards, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1813 Jul 11Add to your cart.
Richards writes from Boston thanking Adams for his kind attention to Amos. She offers her opinion concerning the Camden property and reports on health of family members.
Folder 4: Richards, Sarah Adams, 1816-1819Add to your cart.
Three letters written in Dedham, Mass., to her brother Joseph Adams.
Item 1: Adams, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1816 Feb 1Add to your cart.
Richards writes that she has not heard from Adams in two years. She reports on her family and Mr. Richards's business affairs. They have purchased a house and property in Dedham and have no family there "but George and Mary and a colour'd girl of which I have had two years which I am to keep till she is 18." She encourages Adams to move to Dedham.
Item 2: Adams, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1818 Jun 21Add to your cart.
Richards writes about the health and news of her family and friends. They have made improvements to her house. Mr. Richards is better and is resuming his business.
Item 3: Adams, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1819 AugAdd to your cart.
Richards writes about loss of her dear Sarah. Mr. Lawrence has broken up his house and sent his children to relatives. She reports additional family news. She feels older and more broken down than their sister and is not up to writing.
Folder 5: Richards, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1827 Nov 26Add to your cart.
Richards writes from Dedham, Mass., commenting on Adams's letter in which he reports on his family. She reports on the health and news of her family. She is glad Adams is attached to a minister and describes the many churches and liberal preaching in her neighborhood.
Folder 6: Richards, Sarah Adams, 1829-1834Add to your cart.
Three letters to her brother Joseph Adams.
Item 1: Richards, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1829 Mar 22Add to your cart.
Richards writes from Dedham, Mass., about the health of her family. She intended to ask Kezia to spend the winter, but Mr. Richards's health did not permit it. She relates news of her family.
Item 2: Richards, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1831 Sep 25Add to your cart.
She writes from Dayton, Ohio, about her health. She believes it best to stay close to her children, describes their business activities and activities of other family members and friends. She discusses philosophical differences in churches.
Item 3: Richards, Sarah Adams to Adams, Joseph, 1834 Jan 7Add to your cart.
Richards writes from Boston. She has been to Vermont where she hoped her health would improve. She relates news of family and friends.
Folder 7: Lawrence, Amos (1786-1852) to Richards, Sarah Adams, 1833 Jun 27Add to your cart.
Lawrence writes to his former mother-in-law from Boston. His son William will meet her in Litchfield to accompany her to Boston. He reports news of family health and activities. He does not attend to business much, but provides counsel to his partners. He discusses arrangements for her stay.
Sub-Series 29: Rogers, Kezia Adams (1811-1899)Add to your cart.
Kezia Adams Rogers was the daughter of Joseph and Deborah Marsh Adams.
Folder 1: Rogers, Kezia Adams, 1869-1870Add to your cart.
Three letters to her brother Charles Adams.
Item 1: Rogers, Kezia Adams to Adams, Charles, 1869 May 30Add to your cart.
Rogers writes from Dresden, Germany, about James How's death. She express her sympathy for Julia and discusses her situation. They are enjoying Dresden very much and she describes it, the people, and their religion.
Item 2: Rogers, Kezia Adams to Adams, Charles, 1869 Oct 14Add to your cart.
Rogers writes from Buffalo that she was shocked to learn that Julia had died and expresses her sympathies. She discusses her husband's illness. She writes about visitors and the difficulty in taking up housekeeping after traveling.
Item 3: Rogers, Kezia Adams to Adams, Charles, 1870 Dec 11Add to your cart.
Rogers writes from Buffalo about her relocation and the long, tedious process of packing the books and storing the belongings. She is not going to worry any more about the future. She enjoyed his and the girls' visit. She reports news of family and reflects on her long life.
Sub-Series 30: Wessells, Julia Adams How (1842-?)Add to your cart.
Julia Adams How Wessells (1842-?) was the daughter of Charles and Julia Hinman Adams.
Folder 1: Wessells, Julia Adams How, 1859Add to your cart.
Four letters written from Buffalo to family members.
Item 1: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Sarah, 1859 Jan 30Add to your cart.
Wessells writes about teaching her scholars. She is surprised to read in The Litchfield Enquirer her marriage notice and relates news of family and friends.
Item 2: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Baldwin, Ella Adams, circa 1859Add to your cart.
Letter to her little sister.
Item 3: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1859 Feb 6Add to your cart.
Wessells writes responding to her mother's recent letter which described lively winter activities in Litchfield. She writes about skating, her studies, news of friends and family, and attending entertainments.
Item 4: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Sarah, 1859 Apr 17Add to your cart.
Wessells writes about her activities, including attending a magic lantern exhibition and a concert, her enjoyment of music, the condition of Adams's eyes, and news of family and friends.
Folder 2: Wessells, Julia Adams How, 1860Add to your cart.
Four letters to family members.
Item 1: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Sarah, 1860 Feb 19Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Buffalo about news of family and friends, school, and social activities.
Item 2: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Peck, Sarah Adams, 1860 Jul 24Add to your cart.
Wessells writes to her aunt about family news and her social activities.
Item 3: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1860 Aug 16Add to your cart.
Wessells writes to her mother about her arrival back in Litchfield, people who have called on her or she has called on, and a joke in a telegram.
Item 4: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1860 Sep 20Add to your cart.
Wessells writes to her mother from Buffalo about new of family and friends, her schooling, and social calls she and others have made.
Folder 3: Wessells, Julia Adams How, 1861-1862Add to your cart.
Four letters to family members.
Item 1: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Sarah, 1861 Mar 17Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Buffalo to her sister about surprise at receiving a letter from her given her condition, news of family and friends, entertainments she has attended, her schooling, and the national political climate and President Lincoln.
Item 2: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Sarah, 1861 Apr 11Add to your cart.
Wessell writes to her sister from Buffalo about Adams's illness, news of family and friends, the news from the South and civil war, singing a song at a school concert, and attending musical events.
Item 3: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Sarah, 1862 Mar 2Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Buffalo to her sister to wish her a happy birthday, news of family and friends, making a catalogue of uncle's library, her singing, and social activities.
Item 4: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1862 May 18Add to your cart.
Wessells writes to her mother that they are getting along well with sewing and housekeeping, this is father's fifty-seventh birthday, they have visited Sarah's grave, she supposes her mother will be in Buffalo soon and recommends friends to visit.
Folder 4: Wessells, Julia Adams How, 1863-1865Add to your cart.
Six letters to family members.
Item 1: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Charles and Adams, Julia Hinman, 1863 Mar 29Add to your cart.
Wessells writes about her mother's health, her constant thoughts about Frankie and Sarah, and Mary's health.
Item 2: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Charles, 1863 Jun 12Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Brooklyn about travels of family members, their residence, her daily routine, news of family and friends, her happy marriage and good husband, and Jim obtaining a piano.
Item 3: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1863 Jul 22Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Brooklyn about getting Adams a dress, her health, recent visitors, news of family and friends, being alone and what she is reading.
Item 4: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1864 Mar 28Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Brooklyn about her and her husband's health, the New York Fair and Sanitary Commission, dining at Willow St., and news of family and friends.
Item 5: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Charles, 1864 May 18Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Brooklyn about Adams's fifty-ninth birthday, well wishes from friends, recent visitors, and socializing.
Item 6: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Charles, 1865 May 18Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Brooklyn about her fathers's sixtieth birthday, her loneliness without her husband, and family news.
Folder 5: Wessells, Julia Adams How, 1866-1869Add to your cart.
Five letters to family members.
Item 1: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1866 Jan 28Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Brooklyn to her sister about her sister's birthday, health of family members, upcoming visit to Litchfield, longing for a sleigh ride, news of friends, and social activities.
Item 2: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1866 Sep 16Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from West Hampton, N.Y., about their sudden trip there. She describes her impressions of the landscape and relates family news.
Item 3: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1868 May 23Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Brooklyn about Mary's miscarriage last night.
Item 4: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1869 May 2Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Brooklyn that she has no heart for writing, but feels that she ought to. She longs to see her mother, and her friends are very kind. She thanks God for her two children and prays for strength to take care of them.
Item 5: Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Henry, 1869 Oct 26Add to your cart.
Wessells writes from Terryville, Conn., to her brother about coming up from New Haven with Jimmy and grandmother. She will be glad to be home again. She hopes father is improving and Fannie keeps well.
Sub-Series 31: Wheelock, Mary Adams (1838-1895)Add to your cart.
Mary Adams Wheelock (1838-1895) was the daughter of Charles and Julia Hinman Adams.
Folder 1: Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1855-1860Add to your cart.
Four letters to family members.
Item 1: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Charles, 1855 Oct 27Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes to her father about school and news of family and friends.
Item 2: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1858 Sep 10Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes about family health, her mother's travels, the presents recently received, visitors, and news of family and friends.
Item 3: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Charles, 1860 Jun 29Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes that they have arrived in Washington from Buffalo. Uncle escorted them about the city. They will leave for Litchfield on the early train on Monday. They called on the Hows yesterday and go to Greenwood today and Central Park tomorrow.
Folder 2: Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1862Add to your cart.
Two letters to her mother.
Item 1: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1862 May 21Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes that she is glad her mother has arrived in Bath, N.Y. She writes about activities in their home, health and news of family and friends, wishing her a good visit, and Julia and her giving their father "The Memorial Vol. of the American Board of Missions" for his birthday.
Item 2: Wheelock, Mary Adams and Adams, Charles to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1862 May 25Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes that she is glad her mother is having a pleasant visit. She has reassigned bedrooms for the children and reports on activities in their home. She reports news of friends and family. Her mother must not think of returning for weeks because they are getting along splendidly. They have received many kind letters of sympathy. She received a letter from Charley; he was in the Battle of Williamsburg and says he cannot see how he escaped being killed or wounded. Charles Adams writes that they are getting along nicely and all are well.
Folder 3: Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1863Add to your cart.
Five letters to her parents.
Item 1: Wheelock, Mary Adams and Wessells, Julia Adams How to Adams, Charles, 1863 Mar 18Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes to thank her father for the his letter and the money. She is delighted mother has been to Dea. Catlins and had the neighbors in for tea. Wessells writes that she is delighted to hear about mother's health. They have received a call from Brigadier General Carlin, who has been in a great deal of hard fighting. She went to the art gallery and describes social activities. She received a beautiful philopoena from Mr. Worthington.
Item 2: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1863 Mar 23Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes that she and Auntie went to Bath, N.Y. and reports on family there. She was glad to receive letters from her mother and father. She has thought much of Sarah and Frankie and is very sad. She reports on family news and asks wonders about family and why father resigned as deputy sheriff.
Item 3: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1863 May 4Add to your cart.
Wheelock is glad is mother is gaining strength. She is pleased that the 19th regiment did not join Hooker. She discusses dresses for her sisters, the upcoming visit, and other matters related to Julia's wedding.
Item 4: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1863 Dec 16Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes that she has not been out, but had a number of callers. Yesterday, she attended a historical lecture. She describes other social activities.
Item 5: Wheelock, Mary Adams to [?], circa 1863Add to your cart.
Letter fragment. Wheelock discusses brides' maids dresses, a possible trip to Jamestown, and an invitation to visit from Clara Beebe Darling.
Folder 4: Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1864-65Add to your cart.
Two letters to her mother.
Item 1: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Julia Hinman, 1864 Nov 30Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes from home of family and domestic news.
Item 2: [United States. Dept of Agriculture] to Wheelock, Mary Adams, circa 1864Add to your cart.
Empty envelope.
Item 3: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Charles and Adams, Julia Hinman, 1865 Aug 4Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes from Buffalo about her journey there and whom she traveled with. She met a man who knew Charles fifteen years ago. She is very glad she made the journey by herself this time and had no trouble. She reports news of family and friends.
Folder 5: Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1870-1872Add to your cart.
Six letters written in Brooklyn, N.Y. to her father.
Item 1: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Charles, 1870 Jan 31Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes about news of family and friends, including dining with Charley Graves last night.
Item 2: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Charles, 1870 Feb 6Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes about her concern for her father's health and news of family.
Item 3: Wheelock, John to Adams, Charles, 1870 Feb 6Add to your cart.
John Wheelock's letter was sent with Mary's 1870 Feb 6 letter. He discusses arrangements relating to Ella, Mary, and Fannie.
Item 4: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Charles, 1870 May 27Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes about the funeral services for Joseph and that her thoughts are with her father very much.
Item 5: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Charles, 1871 Mar 11Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes about her concern for Fannie and news of family and friends. It is very kind of him to invite her home for the summer, but she cannot leave her husband and duties here.
Item 6: Wheelock, Mary Adams to Adams, Charles, 1872 Apr 17Add to your cart.
Wheelock writes that she feels half sick and good for nothing. She wishes she could spirit herself to Litchfield during the day because the hours are long and she feels lonely until John comes home. She describes their journey to New York.
Folder 6: Greene, Marie Barton to Wheelock, Mary Adams, 1864Add to your cart.
Marie Barton Greene worked with the Christian Commission and Sanitary Commission attending to wounded Civil War soldiers as they arrived in Washington, D.C. She sent two letters to a sister of Charles Adams (1845-1864), Mary Adams Wheelock, describing how she attended Adams during the last hours of his life on June 11, 1864. Adams had been been severely wounded in  the Civil War Battle of Cold Harbor. John H. Hubbard and several others were present. One letter includes a poem she wrote "suggested by meeting and watching beside" Charles "in his last moments."

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